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  • Monthly Archives July 2004

    Not Every Shoot Is A Winner Here’s the scenario: You go do a shoot, download the images, go through the take, pick the keepers, do your editing, and deliver the shots. The client loves them… But you don’t. They're okay, but they don’t quite send you to your happy place. Sound familiar? If it does, I have some good news for you. You’re not alone. Is there anything wrong with this shot? Not technically, but it's not winning any awards. I would guess that most photographers go through this, even the best ones. No matter how much we try to make the best possible images we can, not every shoot is going to result in a new portfolio image. You can plan all you want, put together your shot list, research the location, research your subject, make inspiration/mood boards, clean your lenses and sensor,…

    Photo by Mike Silberreis Loving Light Hello everyone. My name is Tilo Gockel. I’d like to start by saying that I am incredibly honored to have the opportunity to share my thoughts with you on Scott Kelby’s blog. I’ve been a professional photographer for seven years now. Previous to that I was an engineer, where I was in close contact with image sensors, video transmission, pattern projectors, and optics. Nevertheless, it took me quite some time to understand the technical challenges and the creative impact of photography. After years of practice I’ve now come to think of photography like learning a new instrument: I had to (and still have to) practice the scales, so to speak. Let’s rewind to when I started out. It did not take long for me to become totally addicted to light and lighting. From there, the obsession grew to…

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