• air-jordan-3
  • air-jordan-3-fire-red
  • air-jordan-3-infrared-23
  • air-jordan-3-powder-blue
  • air-jordan-3-white-cement
  • air-jordan-4-bred
  • air-jordan-4-columbia
  • air-jordan-4-oreo
  • air-jordan-4-white-cement
  • air-jordan-5-fire-red
  • air-jordan-5-grape
  • air-jordan-5-oreo
  • air-jordan-5-v
  • air-jordan-6
  • air-jordan-6-carmines
  • air-jordan-6-olympic
  • air-jordan-7-bordeaux
  • air-jordan-7-french-blue
  • air-jordan-7-marvin-the-martian
  • air-jordan-8
  • air-jordan-8-bugs-bunny
  • air-jordan-8-chrome
  • air-jordan-8-playoffs
  • air-jordan-9
  • air-jordan-9-birmingham-barons
  • air-jordan-9-cool-grey
  • air-jordan-10-chicago
  • air-jordan-10-powder-blue
  • air-jordan-10-stealth
  • air-jordan-11-gamma-blue
  • air-jordan-11-legend-blue
  • air-jordan-11-low
  • air-jordan-11-low-bred
  • air-jordan-11-low-citrus
  • air-jordan-12-gamma-blue
  • air-jordan-12-obsidian
  • air-jordan-12-taxi
  • air-jordan-13
  • air-jordan-13-he-got-game
  • air-jordan-14
  • Monthly Archives September 2007

    Thanks to everybody who posted questions, emailed me directly, or called me on the phone with your D3 questions. Disclaimer: Since I don't work for Nikon, these are not in anyway official answers; just my take on the camera after spending a few days in the field with it, and my answers may not correlate with Nikon's thinking, marketing, and/or position for the product. Here we go: Q. Is the D3 really usable at very high ISO (6400 and more), as promised in the advertisements? A. I didn't actually try it at higher than 6400 ISO, but the test shots I took at 6400 ISO were absolutely usable. In fact, they were shockingly usable, and I think you'll see working pros shooting at 6400 ISO with the D3. When you zoom in, you can definitely see noise, so it's by no means "noise free,"…

    I wound up getting stuck overnight in Minneapolis/St. Paul due to a late flight that caused me to miss my connection back to Tampa (thanks Northwest Airlines, which not only made me miss my connection, but then wouldn't release my own luggage to me, or provide me with a room, or well…pretty much anything. It just reminded me once again why I love United, but that's another story). Anyway, while passing through security the TSA Agent at the X-ray belt, said: "That's a LowePro camera bag; do you have a DSLR in there?" I said yes, and he said I had to remove it and put it on the belt. I told him it wasn't a video camera, and he told me DSLR's now have to be removed and put on the belt separately because of their size. So I started screaming at him,…

    I've had a number of posts and emails about my experience with the new Nikon D3 this past week, and to make sure I address the questions you want answered about the new camera, so I invite you to post questions here (in the comments section of this post), that you'd like me to take a shot at answering. I won't have all the answers, but I want to address as many as I can, so thanks for your input, and check back tomorrow for some of the answers. NOTE: I've posted some other shots below from the workshop, including a pano from one of my students.

    Here's another from my Montana workshop (click on it for the larger version, which looks much better). I only had time to go through a few of the shots I've taken, because we had been going nonstop from dawn till late at night, but I took this one last night, as we returned to the stream where we shot earlier in the week, because it was another overcast night. The shot isn't really a pano; it's just "pano cropped" (Bill Fortney gave the idea while I was processing the image in Lightroom (all the processing, sharpening, and cropping was done in Lightroom). I read a number of comments posted this week asking if I would share the camera settings for the shots I post, and I'm more than happy to (thanks for the suggestion): SPECS: Taken with a Nikon D200 (Bill was shooting [read…

    SPECS: Taken using the same D200, and the same 70-200mm VR lens as the previous post, but I only pushed in to 130mm. I set the camera to Manual mode at f/22 with a 20 second exposure (which wasn't enough. I should have stuck with 30 seconds). It was so dark outside by the time I took this shot, I had to take the Vari-ND filter off. In fact, it was so dark, my Auto Focus wouldn't focus, so I switched the lens to manual focus, set the focus to Infinity, and crossed my fingers. Dan, one of my students, offered to shine a flashlight on the falls to help my autofocus work. Even though it wasn't bright enough for the auto focus to snap-to; it did light the falls just enough to help me make the moody picture you see above. I didn't…

    During my GAPW Workshop (with famous landscape photographer Bill Fortney) this past week out in Montana's Glacier National Park, I showed my students how easy it is to shoot and stitch a panorama, thanks to Photoshop CS3's incredible Photomerge feature (which incorporates the mind-blowing Auto Align and Auto Blend features). I gave my students the assignment of shooting a pano and stitching it in CS3 (only one student in the class had ever shot and stitched a pano before). Well, after our dawn shoot at Swiftcurrent Lake, we went to breakfast at the "Many Glacier" hotel right on the water. After breakfast, one of my students, John Cureton, shot his first ever pano from the hotel lobby balcony, overlooking the lake. When we got back to the classroom, John used CS3's Photomerge to stitch it together perfectly and we both were really tickled. John's…

    Close