Monthly Archives October 2008


I’m sad to announce that our dear friend, and one of the true pioneers of Photoshop and digital imaging education, Robb Kerr, passed away this week after a long hard-fought battle with cancer.

Back when Kelby Training first started, we were doing one of our one-day seminars in Nashville (it was our first time to Nashville), and a friend in the area told us, “You’ve got to meet Robb Kerr—-in the Nashville area, he’s the local Photoshop genius.” Well, we met Robb, and it turned out he wasn’t just the ‘local’ genius—he was a true find–a gifted, fun, and engaging Photoshop instructor, and that rare breed who was both a Creative Type and a technical Prepress expert.

We asked Robb to join our team, and from that point on Robb and I would split the day of training, which took a big load off me. 12 years ago we were teaching one of our seminars in Atlanta, when I got the call that my wife’s water broke earlier than expected. I scrambled to the airport, and Robb took over and taught the entire day himself, and did just an amazing job. This enabled me to be there for the birth of my son Jordan, who was born 12 hours later, but beyond that I was able to lighten my travel load and spend time with my growing family, as Robb took over many of my one-day seminars himself, as the first outside instructor in Kelby Training’s history.

With Robb, we now had a rock solid second full-time trainer that helped our company reach new markets and spread our training nationwide. When NAPP Launched Photoshop World, back in 1999, Robb and I were the two featured instructors, teaching 10 sessions each, and it was Robb’s hard work and dedication that made the first Photoshop World such a success.

Robb became a fixture at Photoshop World, teaching classes on everything (more…)


We’re just days away from the release of the 2nd edition of my award-winning “The iPhone Book” (co-authored with my close friend and total iPhone freak Terry White), and we wanted to do something really fun to celebrate the upcoming launch of the book, so here’s what we came up with:

An Apple “iPhone Photo Contest” for photos you take with your iPhone’s built-in camera (which is a surprisingly good little camera. Just ask my wife, who has nearly 700 photos she’s taken on her iPhone). Anyway, here’s how it works:

  1. You can enter up to three photos (total) taken with your iPhone (doesn’t matter if it’s the original model, or the new 3G).
  2. There are five different categories; Friends, Pets, Family, Fine Art, and Office. The winner in each category gets a $100 iTunes Gift card and a copy of “The iPhone Book” 2nd edition.
  3. The Grand prize winner gets a $500 Apple Store Gift Card, and a copy of “The iPhone Book” 2nd edition.
  4. From the photos submitted by the deadline of Oct. 24, 2008, Terry and I will choose three finalists in each category, and then the public gets to vote for the winner in each category (the one getting the most votes wins). Then, from those Winners Terry and I will choose a Grand Prize Winner on November 3, 2008.
  5. This may seem obvious, but of course, the photo has to be taken with your iPhone’s built-in camera.
  6. You can edit your photos using any iPhone application available from the iTunes Apps Store, or any other image editing application, but no other non-iPhoto photos may be included in your entry (so you can’t take your iPhone photo and composite it with a photo taken with your DSLR, point-and-shoot, or a stock photo).
  7. You may not give your iPhone to Jay Maisel, Joe McNally, or Moose Peterson. Not even to make a phone call.
  8. There is no entry fee, and the contest is open to everyone; You do not have to buy “The iPhone Book” to enter, but it certainly wouldn’t hurt. ;-)
  9. Whining of any kind, about anything, is strictly prohibited.
  10. You can submit your photos, and learn more about the contest at the official contest site (here’s the link).

So that’s the scoop. I hope you guys will help me spread the word about this very cool contest, and if you have an iPhone, or know someone who has an iPhone, or if you’re just loose with money, I hope you’ll check the book out (By the way; the 1st edition of “The iPhone Book” was named by’s Editors as their “Computer and Technology Book of the Year” last year, and this new updated version is even bigger and better!).

Just in case you want to pick up a copy, here’s the link to the book on, (it’s only $13.59).



I photograph a lot of concerts, not for money or fame, but because it is something I truly enjoy. Photographing products, models, sports and landscapes are great, but nothing recharges my photographic batteries like the rush as the house lights go down and the stage lights go up.

When Scott asked if I was interested in being a guest blogger, it was the same day that I was invited by Steve Stevens to photograph him playing with Billy Idol at The House of Blues in Los Angeles. I thought that a look into shooting a concert along with a dash of the new Bridge CS4 thrown in would make for an interesting read. Something a little different.

ISO 640 f/2.8 1/80 sec

Concert photography takes practice and planning. The combination of changing lights, moving subjects and a very limited amount of time to get the shot makes concert photography one of the most rewarding and frustrating experiences a photographer can have. As with all type of photography, the best way to get better is to practice. Since it is not all that easy to get credentials to photograph bigger acts, start locally. Most cities have a couple of bars with live music that don’t mind if you come in and photograph, and usually have little if any restrictions. Most of the time, these venues will have horrible lighting and you will want to use a flash to get a good exposure.

I have two good reasons not to use a flash in these circumstances; images taken with a flash will look flat and boring. Good concert shots are about the energy coming off the stage and nothing will kill that quicker than the flash firing straight at the performer. The second reason is that if you ever get to shoot bigger acts in bigger venues, you will not be allowed to use a flash. If you are not used to pushing the ISO or slowing down the shutter-speed, but instead have relied on a flash to get the exposures you want, you will be in for a very frustrating shoot.
ISO 800 f/3.2 1/160

I get a lot of questions about the camera and lenses I use to shoot concerts (more…)