Monthly Archives September 2011

It’s here!!! Tomorrow in more than 1,100 cities around the world my 4th Annual World Wide Photo Walk kicks off, and by tomorrow night nearly 30,000 photographers around the world will collectively have taken literally millions of photos as part of their local Photo Walks. Just “Wow!

If you haven’t signed up for a walk yet: go here  right now and find a walk near you and sign up free! (There are walks planned on both Saturday and Sundy).

If you’re already signed up to walk, here are SEVEN LAST MINUTE PHOTO WALK TIPS to make your day a success:

(1) Walk Leaders: Make Sure You Watch my Leader’s Video
If you’re leading a Photo Walk, go to your Leader’s Dashboard page on the Official Worldwide Photo Walk site and watch my video called my: Top 10 (or so) Tips for Leading A Successful Photo Walk.” There is some VERY important info in that video, so please make absolutely sure you watch it before your walk.

(2) Get a Group Shot Right at the Beginning
Somebody remember to take a group shot before you head out for your walk (it’ll be much harder to corral everybody after the shoot, so get one right before you head out). Send some to me, and I’ll post ‘em on my blog next week.

(3) This is The Gear I’m Taking on My Photo Walk
I’m walkin’ light again this year. I’m going with a Nikon D3s body with just one lens; the 28-300mm f/3.5 – f/5.6 VR lens. I’ll have my Hoodman Loupe with me; and I’ll be wearing my Rapid Strap camera strap.

(4) Don’t Forget to Wear Really Comfortable Shoes
You’ll be doing a lot of walking, so make sure you wear shoes that make your feet happy.

(5) Charge all your batteries tonight
Don’t forget to charge your camera batteries, clean your lenses (and sensor), and make sure you’ve got an empty memory card and a back-up.

(6) Go read Dave Cross’ “Photo Walk Ideas” article
If you’re looking for some great ideas, give Dave’s great article a quick read. It’ll increase your chances for a killer shot! Here’s the link.

(7) The Most Important Thing Is….That you all stay safe
Look out for each other on the walk. Drink plenty of water beforehand and during the walk. Keep an eye on your gear at all times. Don’t go into scary-looking areas, traipsing down deserted alleys, or anyplace that looks unsavory. Don’t get distracted by shooting—you don’t want to bump into, or trip over, anything. Get some great shots, and I’ll see you back here on Monday for a recap of the event.

A special thanks to our wonderful sponsors who made all of this happen (especially Peachpit Press, who is giving all the walk leaders, and walk winners my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it,” book), and to all the photographers around the world who volunteered to lead walks.

My humble thanks to you all for being a part of his historic photography event. Can’t wait to see your shots!!!!!! :-)

All my best,


Hey gang, Brad Moore here with this week’s Pimpy Thursday. Let’s kick things of with some seminar tour dates!

Scott will be heading to Houston, TX and Lansing, MI next week with his Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. Live! Tour, plus Ben Willmore and Matt Kloskowski will be taking their seminars on the road too!

Kelby Training Live
Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. Live! with Scott Kelby
– October 5: Houston, TX
– October 7: Lansing, MI

Photography & Photoshop CS5, From Focus to Finished with Ben Willmore
– October 3: Boston, MA
– October 17: St. Louis, MO
– October 19: Kansas City, MO

Lightroom 3 Live with Matt Kloskowski
– October 26: Phoenix, AZ
– October 28: Indianapolis, IN

Just a couple more days to save ten bucks on select books at
Some of our most popular titles on CS5, Layers, Lightroom and the iPod. Oh, and now that there are only a couple days left, we can tell you that there is actually one book included in the sale that’s only $5.99 and $1.99 for NAPP members!  So head over to KelbyTraining and check it out.

Our Senior Portrait Photography DVD Set is on sale – $30 off the regular AND NAPP member price.
This DVD is perfect for anyone who shoots senior portraits or plans to oversee a shoot … it’s full of unique ideas, lighting tips, and how to make the subject look their best.  $30 Off the 3-DISC set, but only for a limited time.
Close-Up: An Introduction to Macro Photography with Bill Fortney (check out this trailer for the class if you haven’t seen it yet)
DIY Commerce: Selling Your Work Online with Janine Warner

Rick Sammon’s iHDR Mac App
Kelby Training instructor Rick Sammon and app developer Dave Wilson have turned Rick’s iPad iHDR app into a true Mac App! Rick talks about it over on his blog, so head on over to get all the details.

Worldwide Photo Walk T-Shirts
If you haven’t already signed up to take part in the Worldwide Photo Walk, it’s not too late! We’re just a couple of days away, but you can look for a walk and sign up right here. Don’t forget to order your official Worldwide Photo Walk shirt, with all profits going to the Springs Of Hope Kenya Orphanage.

That’s it for today. Have a great Thursday :)


On the road. On assignment. Sounds romantic, right? Well I’m here to tell you — it is, actually! But probably not the way you think.

And probably only if you are a photographic nutcase like me. And since this is Scott Kelby’s blog I’m pretty sure that you are, in fact, a nutcase like me too! So it will be a pleasure to do a little bit of preaching to the choir, and I’m honored to get the chance to do it here.

I thought long and hard about what might be of interest, and went back over recent stories I’ve shot for National Geographic (I’ve been working for the magazine for more than 25 years now.) Somehow I kept coming back to one moment which seemed to boil down the whole experience of shooting a recent story. And I thought I’d take you along on the journey.

Gateway Arch, St. Louis

That moment came as I was driving down I-70, somewhere west of Kansas City. Already I had driven over 3,000 miles on this mega-jaunt in pursuit of a story. I was looking out the windshield for clear skies, but the weather app on my iPhone was giving me bad news. Chicago, my destination tonight, was socked in. No way that I was going to shoot the nighttime aerial of the city I had planned for that night. But maybe the cloud cover over the whole midwest would make something interesting in St. Louis. So I diverted. I made the decision: I’d drive to St. Louis instead of Chicago and take my chances.

That moment of decision has come to symbolize for me what I love about shooting stories. One way or another, I have the freedom to go wherever the pictures were. That’s my job, chasing great pictures.

In many ways taking chances to get great pictures was exactly what this story on light pollution was all about. It was an obscure story about an obscure subject. Most people I told about it had no idea what I was talking about. But then I’d remind them how they used to be able to see the Milky Way before all the city lights got so bright, and they’d nod and tell me some tale about how they remembered seeing the stars on grandpa’s farm when they were kids. Exactly! They didn’t know it, but they were experts on the subject of light pollution. It was my job to make that all graphically real.

And which was why I was taking my chances driving to St. Louis that night. I was looking for places where I could see and photograph the effects of our ever-growing, world-wide hunger to light up the night. I had taken a chance telling National Geographic I could make interesting pictures out of this story. I’d convinced them it was an important story in my initial proposal but I’m not sure everyone really believed the pictures would really sing. And actually, neither was I. But it’s a lot like performing in the circus: if you don’t go out on the tightrope, nobody cheers.

I did have a secret weapon, however: I’d decided that I would drive everywhere for the shoot. The logistics had been driving me crazy. How could I arrange flights to all these locations, never being sure what the weather would do, how to adjust when I screwed up the first night of a shoot and had to go back? Finally, it came to me that I’d be shooting at night (no duh!) and so I’d have all day to drive. I could shoot a few hours from sundown until midnight. Get six hours of sleep and then drive for a good 10-12 hours the next day if I had to in order to get to the next location. Every night I’d be in one of two kinds of places: in a city which had light pollution and I’d photograph that, or in the countryside where I had dark skies, and I’d photograph that. Brilliant. In thirty days I could cover the whole United States, from coast to coast. And I did.

So that night, I got lucky. Pulling in to St. Louis by 5:00 pm I got a couple hours nap before heading out to the nearby Gateway Arch. Wonder of wonders, the heavy overcast that had quashed my shoot in Chicago that night put a layer of clouds just above the top of the arch. Sodium vapor lighting from the city streets turned the clouds a weird salmon color, and incredibly, the spotlights on the arch cast arch-shaped shadows on the the clouds, something like the Batman spotlight calling the caped crusader, straight out of the comic books. I shot it every way I could think of, and most of it looked pretty good. The wide angle shots created a sinister face look and the telephoto shots (like this one that we used in the magazine) were just abstract and intriguing. With five second exposures on my Nikon D3 the sky just glowed. And I went to sleep that night thinking I’d done something I never expected to do.

But that was halfway through the shoot.

Back to the beginning, driving west to Las Vegas:

The Luxor Hotel, Las Vegas

I had planned to start the whole shoot with something I was pretty sure would work: the Luxor Hotel in Las Vegas.


Hi Gang: Just wanted to share a few quick things to follow-up on my post from last week (link) about why I love Google+.

Seeing your photos on G+
One of the views you can choose is right at the top of this post—this is the grid view of my Football Portfolio when I look at it on Google+ (I just posted it this weekend). You can see how many people commented on each image (the small number in the corner of the images show if anybody did comment, and how many), which is helpful for you in determining which images are resounding with your viewers.

How others see your photos
If you saw my post, and clicked on one of the photos, here’s how they’re displayed (above), with the black border and the comments running alongside.

Getting the EXIF Data on the photos is one click away
If you click and hold on the Actions button under the bottom right corner of the photos, you can choose Photo Details, and then you get the screen above with the EXIF data. Pretty handy. :)

My progress on Google+
Last week I mentioned that in just two months on G+ I had just passed the number of people who follow me on Facebook. Well, in the week since then, I’ve already now more than doubled the number (of course, much of that is because Google is now letting the public have accounts, too). I have 18,000+ folks following me on Facebook. By the time you read this, my Google+ number will over 43,000. I’m stunned.

Are your potential clients on Google+?
I saw a number of comments saying basically, “Scott, I think it’s cool that all these photographers are on Google+, but I need to find clients, not other photographers.” I totally agree, and at this point a lot more of your potential clients are on Facebook, and I don’t want you to think I’m trying to talk you out of using Facebook (I couldn’t if I tried, and I’m not going to stop using Facebook either). Here’s the good news: In the last week, more than 10 million people joined Google+ and they’re not all photographers. A lot are your potential customers. It might be easier to stand out here at this point, than it is among the 800 million people on Facebook. :-)

Anyway, just thought I’d do a little follow-up

So, that’s my thoughts on G+ as it stands today, but it’s moving and growing so fast, it’s hard to keep up, so I expect I’ll have more to report soon.

Today I’m up in Philly doing my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it” Tour for nearly 400 photographers (photo above from my Cologne, Germany stop, by Calvin Hollywood). My next stops are: Houston on Oct. 5th and Lansing, Michigan on Oct. 7th. Here’s the link if you want to spend the day with me. Hope I’ll see you there! (Hey, I hope I see you today in Philly!). :)

We’re just four days away, and it’s not too late for any photographers you know to join their local city walks as part of my Worldwide Photo Walk this weekend.

So….I was hoping you might help me spread the word, so as many people as possible have to opportunity to participate in walks. If you could put the word out on your Facebook pages, Twitter, Google+, your blogs, photo club bulletin boards, and anywhere else you think it might help.

Could you send them to main Photo Walk page at

Many thanks in advance, and we’ll see you this weekend! :)