Monthly Archives October 2011

On Friday I announced the winner and Honorable Mentions, but this year once again today I’m going to give my personal favorites in a bunch of different categories. Although these didn’t make the final cut, all of these were in the running at one point or another, and I felt they were so great that they deserved some recognition as well.

I think these images, and the one’s you saw on Friday, are actually even better than they first appear because:

  • The photographers weren’t able to choose the location (it was chosen for them).
  • Or the time of day (also chosen for them).
  • They had to shoot in whatever lighting conditions at that time
  • They couldn’t go back later (or earlier) to shoot in better light.
  • They were only able to shoot for two hours.

Compare that to most any other photo competition, where the photographers can choose any photo from your photo library, or any photo taken in the past year, etc., but in this case, the photographers hands were really tied.

Yet they came away with images that are totally inspiring and very creative. Two hours. That’s it. And look what they came up with! To me, that makes these images all the more amazing.

You and I could both make the case that any of these shots could have been one of the top 10 official Honorable Mentions, or even the Grand Prize winner which is what made the final picks so incredibly hard again this year, but at the end of the day, I had to make a decision, and I did, but it’s harder than it looks. Thanks to everybody who supported my decisions this year. You all have been incredibly gracious and it is much appreciated.

The images that follow are my other favorites that didn’t make their way into a prize category, but are nonetheless deserving of recognition:


Best Shot From Above
Photo by: Mico Salamanca (San Fernando City, Llocos Philippines)

Best Shot of an Adorable Little Girl
Photo by: Magnar Myrtveit (Amersfoort) 

Best Simple Composition (and use of color)
Photo by: Hylas Kessler (Bleton, Texas)

Best Shot of Another Photo Walker
Photo by: Alexis Miranda (Avilés, Principado de Asturias, Spain)

Yummiest Shot
Photo by: Benjamin Bloom (Burlington, Vermont USA)

Best Shot That I Really Wish Was In Focus
Photo by: Prashant Kulli (Bengaluru, Karnataka, India)

Best Shot of Chairs (and there were plenty)
Photo by: Luis Martinex (Bonn, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)

Best Flock of Seagulls
Photo by: Yolande Richard (Cavendish, PE Canada)

Best Shot of a Bird Crying
Photo by: Chase Henderson (Charleston, West Virginia, USA)

Best Shot That Gets Better Once You Spot The Subject
Photo by: Victor Kintanar (Cebu City, Central Visayas, Philippines)

Best Juxtaposition of Color and Form
Photo by: Cindy Gaab (Dallas, Texas USA)

Best Len Flare Shot
Photo by: Jason Bradwell (Des Moines, Iowa USA)

Best Shot With Sun As Subject
Photo by: Jacqueline De Guzman (Doha, Ad Dawhah Qatar)

Best Flower Shot (Well, my favorite anyway)
Photo by: Edmond Joe (Fairfax, Virginia USA)

Best Shot That Looks Like It Was Taken 70 Years Ago
Photo by:Guido Masi, Firenze, Toscana Italia 

Best Non-HDR Shot That Looks Like a Painting
Photo by: Maria Randima Sorensen (Aahrus, Central Denmark Region)

Best Fountain Shot
Photo by: Suraj Lama (George Town, Grand Cayman Islands)

Best “Why Didn’t I Hold My Photo Walk There?” Shot
Photo by: Mikael Servier (Grenoble, RA France)


Best Atmospheric Shot
Photo by: Glenn Euloth (Halifax, NS Canada)

Best Silhouette Photo
Photo by: Omer Burney (Karachi, Sindh Pakistan)


Best Dramatic Shadowy Shot
Photo by: Annie Jensen (Kobenhavn, Hovedstaden Danmark)

Best Shot Where the Subject is the Shadow
Photo by: Doug Vaughn (Lexington, Kentucky USA)


Best HDR at Night Shot
Photo by: Tim Burgess (London, United Kingdom)

Best Shot That Tells a Story
Photo by: RJ Palad (Manilla, NCR Philippines [Intramuros])

Best Shot That’s So Obviously Seattle, But Still Really Good
Photo by: Ben Lucas (Seattle, Washington USA)

Best B&W Shot
Photo by: Jedsada Piamplyachat (Downtown Surin, Thailand)

Most Interesting Flower Shot
Photo by: Sheree Altobelle (Visalia, California USA)

Best Shot Taken From a Moving Vehicle
Photo by: Santiago Perella (Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain)

Best Use of Color in an Non-Architectural Shot
Photo by: Ali Nasri (Tehran, Tehran Iran)

Best Shot Lit With An Off-Camera Flash
Photo by: Sreejith V Raja (Sharjah, Sharjah United Arab Emirates)

Best Water Drops Shot
Photo by: Susan Liepa (Riverside, California USA)

Best Shot Of Something Exploding During Their Photo Walk
Photo by: Artem Zhushman (Mueang Phuket, Phuket Thailand)

Best Shot That Looks Totally Staged
Photo by: Dian Wahya Utami (Parkes, ACT Australia)


Best Shot That Just Makes Me Smile Every Time I see It
Photo by: Eddie Greenly (Portland, Oregon USA)


My sincere congratulations to every one who entered the contest (it does take guts), and especially to all these fantastic photographers whose work I really felt deserved some extra recognition.





Imagine this: You have nearly 1,000 winning images from around the world, and now you have to narrow it down to just 10 finalists and one grand prize winner. This is not an easy job.

It took me hours of careful consideration to just get down to my first rounds of cuts, which left me with around 78 photos. I could make a case why each one of those could have been a winner—-they were all so good—-but unfortunately I can only choose 11 total. Ask anyone who has judged a photo competition—it’s a frustrating task, and you get torn between one photo or another, and you have to make tough cuts that see some of your favorite photos fall out of the top 10.

On Monday, you’ll see some of those photo that didn’t make the top 11, but were still so good I felt they needed a special mention. Also, on Monday I’ll post a link to the “People Choice” page where you can vote for your favorite image to win the “People Choice Award.” 

OK, I won’t keep you waiting any longer; let’s get to the winners and we’ll talk in a few moments. Here are the 10 Honorable Mentions (in no particular order):

By Eli Drlu (Bucuresti, Bucuresti Romania Photo Walk)
I know the image has kind of a creepy look to it, but I kept coming back to it again and again. I love the composition, the bright light coming from outside that’s totally blown out. I love the texture and the color, and it’s just a really interesting image.The guy standing at the window put it over the top. Nicely done.

By Kristin MacPherson (Regina, SK Canada [Wascana Centre, Regina] Photo Walk)
I love this composition, and the black white (or slightly duotoned look) the photographer applied to the image. The shadows in this image are awesome, as the sun could hardly be in a better place to make this image come together. Plus, the fact that there’s just three trees is awesome (three is a great number composition wise). I even think the lens flare adds to the photos. Very cool image, and great post processing. 


By Arthur Lewis (Camden Town, England Photo Walk)
I love how that one red drape stands out in such a big way. If the photographer thought to remove the color from her skin so it matched the surroundings—bravo! If he didn’t, maybe it’s even better. However, the reflection of the red drape on her arm on the right makes me wonder if her skin was just that white. Either way, a really interesting image.

By Adrian V (Cludad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Capital Federal Argentina Photo Walk)
This one made me do a double-take, because when I first saw it, I thought for moment that there was a little boy running behind him, but more likely I think it’s a small billboard or sign on the wall behind him, but it’s his facial expression, and his clothing against that background that makes this shot make me smile. What an interesting character.

By Andres Mendez (Madrid, Comunidad de Madrid, Spain Photo Walk)
I really like the way this composition makes a perfect  “X” through the image, but ti’s the varying color of the buildings, against that blue sky, that takes it over the top. This is another one where as soon as I saw it, I immediately liked it. Really nice composition, and kudos to Andres for thinking to look up.

By Ann Richardson (Nashville, Tennessee, United States Photo Walk)
This image was so different from most of the other entries that it really stood out. I love the vibrant colors, and the way Ann got really close to the subject. I also love how the license plate in the back is so well lit that it draws attention to the name, which suits the car so wonderfully. I also dig the use of a f/stop that would give the starbright effect to the streetlights, which I think adds a lot to the overall image. Looks like a fun walk that night in Nashville.

By Duy Pham (Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Photo Walk)
I love the color, light, and composition of this shot, with the subject down low and lots of open space above that just draws you down to the subject. I love that there’s just enough light on the subject that it’s not a total silhouette and whole mood of the shot just makes me wish I was there to have Photo Walked in this area myself. Nice capture!

By Kenny Kinter (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania USA [Downtown] Photo Walk)
If I had to choose a 3rd place shot, this would be the one. This is a print I would buy, frame, and hang in my home because I just love the symmetry and composition of the image. I love the square cropping, and I love the way the sky kind of blows out to nothing. Really great shot!

By Barbara Ingersoll (Portsmouth, New Hampshire, United States Photo Walk)
It’s tough to make a great Photo Walk shot on a rainy day, but I think Barbara did just that with this great shot. I love the color tone to this image, and the water drops on the seats, the reflections on the brick, and for me the whole thing just works. As soon as it came on my screen I loved it. Very nicely done, and very tough-to-shoot conditions.

By Shyan Valentine (Magna, Utah USA Photo Walk)
If I had to choose a 2nd place shot, this would be the one because I was really torn between this shot and the winning shot. I love the cloudy moonlit sky in the background and the way it’s positioned so perfectly in the composition (balancing the large arcs on the right side with the darker sky). Although this is a very artistic shot, when I look at this photo, I just want to know the story, and that makes it work for me on so many levels. Great color, great long exposure, great composition, just a great shot. Love it!




By Jaime Cesar Tibe (Surigao City, Caraga Philippines Photo Walk)
This shot makes me smile. As soon as I saw it, I smiled, and I’m still smiling. I love the composition and its sense of balance, and I think the post processing was spot on. I love the color all the around, and how the sky looks versus the water, and I particularly love the bubbles in the lower right corner from the last jumper. Just looks like a beautiful summer’s day, and a wonderful scene along the walk route, and it’s the kind of shot I see on places like and think, “Wow, what a cool shot!” Great capture, moment, emotion, processing, and composition. :)


A special thanks to all our sponsors for their gracious support and prizes; to our Walk Leaders who did such an outstanding job once again of giving of their time and talents to make their local walks happen, and to the wonderful photographers from around the world who created such inspiring, creative, and beautiful work.

NOTE: Don’t forget: Although this phase is over, we still have the People’s Choice Award to pick, and a special competition for your Walk Leaders (new this year—-full details next week), and on Monday I’m posting a series of other images that, while they didn’t win a prize, are so good that I felt that needed special recognition. So check back Monday to see some other amazing shots from my Fourth Annual World Wide Photo Walk.

Have a great weekend everybody, and congrats to this years winners! 

Hi Gang: I’m hard at work tonight narrowing things down from nearly 1,000 local walk winning images to come up with the 10 finalists and the Grand Prize Winner for my 4th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk.

Once again, this year it’s really tough narrowing things down (you just can’t imagine how challenging it is), because there are so many great entries, but nevertheless—-I plan to releases the winner’s names and images here today at 12:00 PM Noon EDT.

I hope you’ll check back then to see some really cool images (and good luck to all the entrants) :)


Hey gang, Brad Moore here with this week’s news:

Kelby Training Live
Check the dates below to see if Scott, Matt, or Dave is coming to your town!

Lightroom 3 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Oct. 26: Phoenix, AZ
Oct. 28: Indianapolis, IN
Nov. 2: Tampa, FL
Nov. 7: Arlington, TX

Light It. Shoot It. Retouch It. Live with Scott Kelby
Nov. 14: San Francisco, CA
Nov. 21: Seattle, WA

Photoshop CS5 Power User Tour with Dave Cross
Nov. 9: Chicago, IL
Nov. 15: New York, NY
Nov. 16: Toronto, ON
Nov. 30: San Diego, CA
The latest addition to is Working with Speedlites: One Flash Photography with Syl Arena, author of The Speedliter’s Handbook. Syl takes you through all the basics of using Canon speedlites, including camera settings, modes, color temperatures, ETTL, manual mode, high-speed sync, and even which types of batteries work best! If you’re a Canon speedlite user, you’ll definitely want to check this class out.

Kelby Training Specials
Don’t forget that when you buy a book, DVD, or bundle from in October, your order ships with a coupon good for $10 off your next purchase — so order now, and save more later!

For those of you who LOVE Scott’s books in the spiral bound version, here’s a special for you. It’s the Scott Kelby Spiral Bound Reference Set (yeah, catchy name) and it’s ONLY available at You’ll get both The Adobe Photoshop CS5 Book for Digital Photographers AND The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3 Book for Digital Photographers spiral-bound editions for just $98.99 (or less if you’re a NAPP member)!

If you’re planning a shoot for your high school senior we have a killer DVD set on sale for $30 off. It’s a 3-disc set by James Schmelzer called Senior Portrait Photography and it covers everything from indoor lighting to outdoor lighting to cool ideas for backdrops and props.  This one is good whether you’re going to be the one behind the lens or if you’re going to be assisting with some of the ideas and setup for the shots.

Tim Mantoani’s Behind Photographs Book
You may remember Tim Mantoani’s first guest blog where he talks about his Behind Photographs project. Now he’s turning his historic project into a book, and you can be part of the project! Head over to Kickstarter to check out what you can get by helping Tim fund this project, and check out the full project at

Epson at Photo Plus Expo
If you’re going to be at Photo Plus Expo in New York next week, make sure you stop by the Epson booth. They’ve teamed up with Greg Gorman, Jeff Schewe, and Bert Monroy to create two 40×60 backlit images for their booth. They combined the beauty of a model, photographed by Greg, and body art, created by Bert in Adobe Illustrator, and added to the model by Jeff using Adobe Photoshop, to create these large-scale works of art. There’s also some hidden meanings that will be explained at the display, so look closely! Here’s a sample of what you’ll see:

Randy Van Duinen Gallery Opening
If you’re in the Tampa area, swing by the AIA Gallery tomorrow night between 6pm-9pm for Randy Van Duinen’s Disappearing Florida show opening!

That’s it for this week. Stop back by again tomorrow for an update from Scott on his DLWS Lake Placid experience :)

The Making of a Photographer

I must start off by stating that it’s a huge honor to be writing for Scott’s blog, given that I picked up my first Kelby-authored book back in 2003 while learning to use Photoshop 7.  I should also note that I’ve been reading and envying the talented guest bloggers on Scott’s site for years, so it’s quite humbling to join the roster. I must admit it’s also a bit intimidating … because that very roster includes many of the photographers who inspired me when I picked up my first DSLR three years ago.  However, as I reflect on my current work as a commercial photographer, I realize that my journey into photography started long before I ever picked up a camera.  I can clearly recall key milestone events, as bizarre and trivial as they may seem, that helped to move me further along a path in the world of visual arts.

The first key moment in my journey took place within the first few days of elementary school when I got my first big art assignment. The teacher asked each of us to draw a picture of our family’s house.  As expected, all of my classmates turned in the standard drawing of a square with a triangle on top.  Now, I’m not sure if this was because they weren’t pumped about the assignment or if they each lived in a box with a parking cone on top… but I saw this assignment as an opportunity to get the creative juices flowing while busting out my new pack of colored pencils that my mother packed in my school bag.  While my finished rendering was no Picasso, the teacher was thoroughly impressed with the amount of detail I captured in my first real art project.  This was my first experience of turning a visual thought into a real creation and receiving accolades from another person.  In other words, I just pleased my first client! This was something that really provided me with personal pleasure and was the first time I really discovered the joy of art.

My second milestone event took place in 3rd grade when my art teacher took notice of my work and asked me to do a drawing demo at the upcoming art fair.  The demo consisted of me sitting awkwardly at a table while drawing ninja turtles as people walked by. It was a bit bizarre but it was a real confidence booster at the same time. There’s a saying that goes something like this, “You’re not an artist until an artist tells you so.” I never considered my own artwork to be anything special but that changed upon receiving praise from an artist with some credibility. It was the confidence booster that I needed to keep doodling, and that’s exactly what I did.

I never put down the colored pencils, and the doodling never stopped.  Yet another notable incident occurred in middle school when I sold my first drawing.  It was a full-color rendering of Beavis & Butthead for which a fellow classmate offered a whopping ten bucks! That was no chump change in middle school but the dollar amount wasn’t the key significance, it was the realization that art could be more than just a hobby.  Shortly after, I started getting requests from more and more peers as I was beginning to see the business potential in my craft.

In high school, I took years of drafting class because architecture seemed like a great career choice that would take advantage of my passion for drawing.  It was almost déjà vu when I was assigned to draw my family’s house once again, but this time a few rectangles and green blobs (trees) weren’t going to cut the mustard. I was to create detailed blue prints and even produced a scale model made of foam board. I didn’t end up fully pursuing architecture because it turned out to be a bit more technical and less creative than I had hoped. Nonetheless, the experience certainly helped sharpen my sense of detail. To this day, I am haunted by flashbacks of the T-square every time I create a new guide in Photoshop!

Now entering college with architecture out of the picture, I was back to doodling and wondering where I could direct my artistic capabilities. I still wanted to pursue a creative career but I didn’t want to end up a starving artist. Just as I hit this roadblock in my creative career path, I was introduced to the world of computer aided design. I was working at a small office on campus at my community college when I met the in-house graphic artist. I found myself constantly sneaking out of my office to see what he was creating with computer software that resembled science fiction to me. Either way, I knew it was time to merge my traditional art skills with technology and that’s exactly what I did. I started learning about computers and shortly after, I was building my first custom PC and getting enrolled into the Digital Media program at UCF.

Although my decision to get into graphic design was a bit spontaneous and not completely based on traditional career planning, I knew it was the right decision. I was soon learning about all aspects of digital media including computer illustration, game design, web design, 3d animation, photography, and video & music production. I continued focusing most heavily on graphic design and started freelancing before I finished college. Once I completed my degree program, I set out into the job market and landed my first gigs as a graphic artist which included work at a print shop, a small publishing company and a global accounting firm. I finally made it! Or so I thought…

After working in the graphic design field for several years, there was a problem. I wasn’t completely fulfilled and I needed another creative outlet. Up until that point, I had very little experience with photography with the exception of borrowing my Dad’s film cameras to record weekend rollerblade sessions with my friends back in middle school. In mid-2008, I made a purchase that turned out to be the biggest milestone of my life: I purchased my first DSLR, a Nikon D80.

I bought a camera because I was doing a lot of wake boarding at the time and wanted to capture our sessions just like I did in my skating days. After having my camera for a couple weeks, I met a photographer out on my friend’s boat who showed me some pics he took earlier that day during a fashion shoot. I was intrigued to say the least. He proceeded to tell me about a local Photography Meet & Greet that was two weeks away and I told him to count me in. I attended, snapped some photos of the models who showed up, and the rest was history. It’s been a little over three years since that event and I haven’t put down my camera ever since.

Becoming a commercial photographer was never my intended plan… but I can now see that it was life’s plan for me. The journey that started within my first week of grade school eventually led to developing a craft as well as a passion.  With that said, it’s hard to imagine that I may have never discovered what makes me happiest had I missed any of those key moments. Either way, I couldn’t be happier with the way things unfolded and the best part is—this is only the beginning!

Joey Wright is an Orlando-based photographer specializing in swimsuit, beauty, and commercial fashion photography. You can see more of his work at

We had a great first day (well, technically it started Sunday night, but today was our first day out shooting). We started with an early morning shoot (it wasn’t really a dawn shoot, that’s this morning, this was an after sunrise shoot in a forrest and at a waterfall.

Shooting in the forrest can really be a challenge (it was for me anyway), because you’re surrounded by all this beauty every where you look around you, but then you raise the camera to your eye and you only see one small part of the big picture, and now it looks busy and messy and just….well….nothing like what you’re seeing with your eyes. Very frustrating, but Moose had some great tips and that helped a lot.

We’ve got a great group of students—really nice folks, and totally engaged. Very serious about learning, and that makes it great for us as instructors. I taught a Photoshop/Lightroom class today and took the class through a start to finish from some of my shots from this morning. After two shoots (morning and near dusk), I don’t have anything I’m real happy with yet, but hey…it’s just day one.

I’m heading down to the bar for a get together with the students, and a couple of portfolio reviews, so I’d better head out. Tomorrow’s Guest Blog Wednesday so I won’t be posting here, but if I get anything I’ll post it over on my Google+ page (link). Have a great Tuesday everybody, and we’ll see you back here on Thursday.