Monthly Archives May 2013

How to Create an Architectural Photo: Manhattan Style I’d first like to thank Scott and Brad for inviting me to be a guest blogger!  When I was asked to write a post, I was very excited and immediately began thinking about what to share.  I love when photographers show how they created one of their favorite images from start to finish, so that’s what I’m going to do for you. Although architecture is a relatively small niche of photography, there are many architectural photographers out there; each with their own style of shooting and retouching.  Some do very minimal retouching, if any, to their photographs, but I am not one of those.  I put just as much time, love and attention to detail in post as I do on set.  Every square inch is accounted for whether I’m behind the camera or behind the… Great video clip from my buddy Matt Kloskowski on what he thinks may well be the most useful button in Lightroom (he originally ran this over on last week). I can't say I disagree, because I use it literally every single day dozens of times (if not more). If it's not "the" most useful button, it's surely is among the very top! Hope you all have a great Monday. :)

Audi R8 Detail Shoot with some interesting new lights When I found out one of my friend's had a brand new red Audi R8, I was begging them to let me shoot it, and this week I got about an hour to shoot some detail shots (here's a few above), and the car was, just insane! I'm hoping to get another chance soon to shoot the full car in an airplane hanger, so I'm pretty psyched. But for this shoot I tried out some groundbreaking new lights, and I don't want to spill the beans because I did a behind-the-scenes video (hopefully I can share it here next week), but they were pretty darn slick, and I can't wait to share it with you as soon as the video is ready. Location shoot for Empower Boxing Yesterday I snuck out of the office with…

Indoor Lifestyle Photography with Erik Valind In his latest class, Indoor Lifestyle Photography, lifestyle photographer Erik Valind photographs scenes in various locations and shows you how to use various light modifiers, pose your subjects, compose your shots, and deal with challenges on location. Learn how to mix artificial light with available ambient light to look natural, then utilize that to perfectly light different locations like living rooms, retail locations, and restaurants. Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class! Kelby Training Live Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Matt Kloskowski, RC Concepcion, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours! The Shoot Like A Pro Tour with Scott Kelby May 23 – Seattle, WA May 24 – Los Angeles, CA Photographic Artistry with Adobe Photoshop with Ben Willmore May 15 – Columbus, OH May 21 – Boston, MA Photoshop CS6 for…

I'm humbled to make another appearance on Guest Blog Wednesday. I can't fathom what in the world Scott was thinking when he thought to have me return for a third time, though. When I think about the giants of photography who have shared their knowledge as Guest Bloggers, the pressure of trying to articulate something that will be worthwhile overwhelms me. I've gone to the well twice now and I'd like to think that I did so without completely embarrassing myself. Maybe I should have quit while I was ahead, but here I am, this time writing about golf photography and how I shoot the sport.

The quiet before the storm at the Augusta National clubhouse

Golf photography is really no different than any other type of sports photography, or really photography in general. Each genre or sport has its ins & outs, nuances and idiosyncrasies that aren’t necessarily difficult to grasp, but it sure helps if you're aware of them before you head out to shoot. Here are some preliminary thoughts, followed by a more detailed discussion on equipment, positioning and the types of shots I look for when I shoot the sport of golf.

Walking to the 18th green with Peter Hanson

One thing I have discovered is that golf is one of the most physically demanding sports to shoot, at least the way I go about shooting events and tournaments. I'm sure you're sitting there, scratching your head when you read that since golf is not typically thought of as a physically demanding sport. But when I shoot a PGA golf event, it's almost always as a Tournament Photographer or for a wire service. Therefore, my job is either: 1) to follow an assigned group for most of a round, occasionally catching up with or dropping back to follow other groups on the course; or 2) to photograph players in contention and the "name" players. That means I don't hunker down in one place and photograph the golfers as they come through that spot on the course. My photo obligations require that I do a lot of walking (and running).

Consider that most any PGA golf course is approximately 5 miles in length. Add to that going from greens to tee boxes, constantly moving from one side of the fairway to the other to get into position, etc., and it is not unusual for me to log in some 6 to 7 miles on any given dayâ¦with approximately 40 pounds of camera gear attached to my body in some fashion or another.

Jim Furyk tees off on #18 at Augusta National

I also make it a priority to capture images from unconventional vantage points. This requires a lot of extra climbing, squatting, sprinting, wading or other forms of physical exertion. For example, in order to capture the image above of Jim Furyk teeing off on #18 at Augusta National,