Posts By Brad Moore

MASTER FX: Maleficent Character Effects in Photoshop with Corey Barker
Take your Photoshop effects skills to the next level with the first class in a new series from Corey Barker! Each Master FX class is a project-based course where you will learn how to do something creative as well as use an assortment of Photoshop tools in ways you might not have thought of before. The project in this class was inspired by the movie Maleficent, and Corey demonstrates, step-by-step, how you can start with a simple portrait and take a creative journey in Photoshop that involves seamlessly incorporating elements from other sources as well as creating new elements from scratch. By the end of the class you'll be looking at using Photoshop in entirely new ways.

Click here to watch the first lesson for free!

Dreamweaver: Next Steps with Janine Warner
In this course, Janine Warner will take you through how to create a variety of different page layouts using html and css. Begin in Photoshop and move on to Dreamweaver. Discover the different layout features used in Dreamweaver, as well as how layouts can give you a headstart in your designs. Also, how to optimize your finished web pages for viewing on tablets and smart phones.

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, RC Concepcion or Ben Willmore live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they're coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
Sept 22 - Phoenix, AZ
Sept 28 - Austin, TX
Oct 16 – Washington, DC

The Moment It Clicks with Joe McNally
July 17 - Toronto, ON
Aug 21 - Orlando, FL
Aug 24 - Miami, FL

Lightroom CC Power Tour with RC Concepcion
Aug 26 -  Charlotte, NC
Sept 16 - Arlington, TX
Sept 24 - Milwaukee, WI

Lightroom & Photoshop Creative Integration Tour with Ben Willmore
Aug 4 - Kansas City, MO
Aug 6 - St. Louis, MO

These are just some of the upcoming dates for these seminar tours. You can find the full calendar of events right here, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Rocky Nook’s Guide to Photographing Cuba
Curious about photographing Cuba? Rocky Nook has a free eBook just for you! It covers topics like:

  • What to pack including items not readily available while abroad
  • How to select the best gear to take with you
  • Friendly advice on how to best interact with the local culture
  • Top photography locations, insight, and suggestions
  • Beautiful images conveying the landscape, architecture, and culture of Cuba
You can check it out right here!

Vincent Versace at the B&H Event Space
Vincent Versace has a number of workshops coming up at the B&H Event Space on August 3 and 4! If you’re interested in color to black and white conversion, printing and calibration, having your print work critiqued, or infrared photography, he’s got you covered. Just click any of those links to register for the events, and, you know, show up for them, and you’re all set!

Last Week's Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Michael Glover

If that's you, we'll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!


Photo by Mike Silberreis

Loving Light

Hello everyone. My name is Tilo Gockel. I'd like to start by saying that I am incredibly honored to have the opportunity to share my thoughts with you on Scott Kelby's blog. I've been a professional photographer for seven years now. Previous to that I was an engineer, where I was in close contact with image sensors, video transmission, pattern projectors, and optics. Nevertheless, it took me quite some time to understand the technical challenges and the creative impact of photography. After years of practice I've now come to think of photography like learning a new instrument: I had to (and still have to) practice the scales, so to speak.

Let's rewind to when I started out. It did not take long for me to become totally addicted to light and lighting. From there, the obsession grew to include flash, because flash yields the most possibilities of all the artificial light sources. Then I took another small step and got interested in the "Strobist" field and community. I thought, "Wow, look at all these shots made with some inexpensive off-brand speedlights from Asia. I want to be able to do this!"

Lighting with all variety of flash units does imply a bit of technical expertise, even in a time of tethered shooting, TTL, modeling flash, and many other great options and features. For me, as a former nerdy engineer (still nerdy, to be honest), using flash offered the perfect combination of fiddling a bit with cool technical stuff and being creative.

I love to try something new on every shoot. I really don't like to do the same old routine day after day. I remember a photo job during which I had to shoot rubber gaiters and shoe stretchers. Dozens of them, in all colorsâ”after two days, I hated it! For me, I have to be doing something new to stay interested, like shooting underwater, "bokehrama" images, powder and ashes, motion, and of course, experimenting with different light sources.

What I also like to do is teach. Each summer I give a lecture on photography basics and I also teach a flash photography workshop. So, it was only natural that I wrote a book called One Flash! Great Photography with Just One Light to help even more photographers understand the crucial elements of flash photography. What made me even prouder was when this book was translated from German to English.

What I cover in the book is what I've deemed "the one flash approach." This is a very zen-like approach to flash photography, emphasizing the use of one single flash. You might think that is a very challenging restriction, but actually it is quite liberating--less stuff to buy and maintain, less to carry. More time to set up that one light properly and to shoot. I really enjoyed every single shoot in this book. And we shot a lot. The book covers motifs like food, products, and people, and techniques such as bouncing flash, supersync, flash composites, and bokehramas. One part of the book that I found to be really interesting was about shooting with shadow patterns. Here's a sneak peek.

Imagine you are forced to shoot inside in an empty room and you only have your camera and one speedlight with you. Now, to get shots that are a bit more creative than the typical "girl in front of a white wall" shot, you have to think outside the box. I chose to project some interesting shadows on the subject. For the first example, I cut some reeds from a nearby sea and shot the flash through them. This not only makes the light a bit softer, it also gives that interesting pattern projection on the model's face.


A bunch of reeds and a speedlight-a simple scene to shoot photos with interesting shadow patterns.


The outcome: Safari girl, lying on a cowhide, looking sexy!


"Like Rita Hayworth!" Photos with lots of shadows also look fine in black & white.

For the next shot, I used a piece of cheap synthetic lace and shot the flash from a long distance through that "gobo"--the longer the distance, the sharper the projection.


An even simpler setup: A single speedlight shining through a piece of synthetic lace.


The resulting image with the floral pattern on the girl's face.

Traveling light and shooting with only one flash is easy, and it has great potential. Being freed from all the technical complexity that comes with more gear, you can focus on the things that really matter, like communicating with the model and creating images with emotional impact.

--Tilo Gockel

You can see more of Tilos's work at his blog (in German) and follow him on Flickr, Facebook, or via the author's page at Rocky Nook. If you want to find out more about the projects and workshops in the book, have a look at the image gallery on Flickr.

Shooting Sports Physiques on Location with Glyn Dewis
Glyn Dewis
has two new classes out and they are all about shooting sports physiques on location. The first class covers the shoot and the second class is all about the post process Glyn uses. Glyn walks you through his gear, five different lighting setups, and many post production tips.

Photoshop World EZ Pay
We’ve introduced an easy way to pay for your Photoshop World tickets. You can now purchase your tickets in 2 or 3 installments that include special bonuses like Adobe CC annual membership and concert tickets. Just visit PhotoshopWorld.com and click on EZ Pay.

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, RC Concepcion or Ben Willmore live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they're coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
July 14 - London, UK
Sept 22 - Phoenix, AZ
Sept 28 - Austin, TX

The Moment It Clicks with Joe McNally
July 13 - Ottawa, ON
July 15 - Calgary, AB
July 17 - Toronto, ON
Aug 21 - Orlando, FL
Aug 24 - Miami, FL

Lightroom CC Power Tour with RC Concepcion
Aug 26 –  Charlotte, NC
Sept 16 – Arlington, TX
Sept 24 – Milwaukee, WI

Lightroom & Photoshop Creative Integration Tour with Ben Willmore
Aug 4 - Kansas City, MO
Aug 6 - St. Louis, MO

These are just some of the upcoming dates for these seminar tours. You can find the full calendar of events right here, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Mark Stephen Richards

If that’s you, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

My Three Inspirations
If you had told me ten years ago that I would be making a living by traveling internationally 7 months a year while taking photos and making films, I would have laughed at you. If you had told me I would start a company called Resource Travel to share inspirational travel visual stories, I would have called you crazy. But that’s exactly what I do. And every day I try to figure out how it all happened.


Shaban, the Shisha Man Of the Wadi Rum desert in Jordan.


School children beg for money outside of a temple in Cambodia.


A man pauses for a reflective moment in the Taj Mahal, India.

I mean, I didn’t even leave the United States until I was 27 years old. Traveling and experiencing the world had mostly never even crossed my mind. I wasn’t against the idea at all, I just hadn’t had that “wanderlust” feeling since childhood, when I would thumb through my father’s National Geographic magazines.


A woman sweeps the streets of Oropesa Peru in the afternoon light.


A group of children sit on their boat outside of their home in a floating village on the Tonle Sap River in Cambodia. 


A boy shows he can write his ABC’s at a school in India.

But that all changed when I found the first real inspiration of my life. Photography. Even at 27 years old, and I had never really found anything that I was passionate about. I signed on to photograph around Peru with a company called The Giving Lens. This would be a scouting trip to work with an NGO in Oropesa, Peru called Picalor House. That trip would be the start of what would become the second real inspiration of my life. Travel. When I hit the ground in Peru, I noticed that looking at the world through my viewfinder made me see things that I had never seen before. I saw smiles, happiness, tears, and pain on the faces that I would encounter. And I felt compelled to capture those faces through my lens. And surprisingly, even the people with the tears and pain would let me take their portrait. I learned that even if someone was having a bad day, they would still let you into their world.


Lek Chailert often sings Thai lullabies to her elephants to help them fall asleep after a long day at the Elephant Nature Park. 


A Monk walks through the Tep Preah nom Pagoda while a girl and a dog play in the humid mid morning Cambodian air.


A boy stands outside of his home in a barrio in Granda, Nicaragua.

I would talk to people and try to get to know their stories. Every face has a story to go with it, and I was determined to hear them. Even if I never tell the stories when I post the photos, I will always remember them, and that is what inspires me to approach the people I meet on my travels, because I never know what their story is unless I ask them.


A monk enjoys a laugh inside a Pagoda in Cambodia.


A girl laughs on the steps of a mosque in Old Delhi, India.

I quickly became consumed with the idea of telling visual stories through the faces that I encountered on those dusty Peruvian streets. When I returned to my home in San Francisco, California, I couldn’t think about anything but traveling, camera in hand, ready to convey the emotions that I felt being in that foreign land. Soon after, I started leading workshops for the The Giving Lens, and have been fortunate to work with organizations around the world, helping to tell their stories and to highlight both the pain and successes that come from their tireless efforts.


An old merchant woman takes a nap at her stall in Peru.


Young children take a break from lighting off fireworks during the festival of Diwali in Delhi, India

While most of the travel photography you see today consists of beaches, hot air balloons, and people standing on the edges of cliffs, I still believe in also telling the stories of the people who aren’t fortunate enough to live by the resorts or walk down the main roads where the tourist shops reside. I fell in love with telling the stories of the people who make their home country come alive. Sometimes, the stories aren’t always pretty. Sometimes they can be rather uncomfortable to witness. But there is a big world out there, and a very small part of it lives in the tourist towns.


An old man enjoys a cigerette while he plays a local board game in the central square in Al-Salt, Jordan.


A merchant outside of a narrow ally way in Al-Salt, Jordan.

My love for sharing the powerful travel visual stories that I see every day is what led me to start Resource Travel. This has turned into the third inspiration of my life. I believe that, as a community, we can help others learn about the happiness and the pain of the world through our photographs. That is what inspires me to share the world’s   stories. As my friend Chris Burkard once said “If you aren’t sharing your work, then what are you doing?”


A merchant waits for a buyer on the streets of Oropesa, Peru.


A man walks outside of a Mosque in Old Delhi, India.

You can see more of Michael’s work at BonocoreVisualStudios.com, and follow him on FacebookInstagram, and the Resource Travel blog.

Ever since I first heard this lens was coming (and that seems like forever ago), I have just dying to get my hands on it. For past year or so I had been relying on my 16-35mm, but then I got a Canon 14mm prime lens and fell in love with it, but the thought of having a zoom that goes all the way out to 11mm, yet not being a fisheye, made it (at least on paper) my dream lens (photo above courtesy of B&H Photo) 

We took a family vacation just a couple of weeks ago and I got Canon to loan me one for the trip so I could do a field test, and see if it was all it was cracked up to be. Right before I left on the trip, Brad wanted to borrow it for his concert shoot at Red Rocks with Third Day, so he took it out too, and then Fed Ex’d it to me (Brad’s comments are here, too â” along with some sample images from him down toward the bottom).

I can tell you thisâ¦
It is, hands down, my favorite wide angle zoom ever! Don’t get me wrong, the 14mm is a really sweet lens. Really sweet. But it’s not 11mm. And it doesn’t zoom out to 24mm. And the 11-24mm does 14mm. And 16mm. And everything in between. It’s the dream.

What I loved:
It is sharp as a tack, edge to edge; it focuses fast, and the distortion is absolutely minimal, which on an 11mm is pretty crazy. It’s just an unbelievable lens. I’m crushed I have to send the loaner back, but my next call is to B&H to get on the waiting list.

What you need to know:
It’s a pretty large sized lens; it’s pretty heavy, and it’s fairly expensive (but at least it’s totally worth it on all three counts).

Above: The view from above the clouds at the top of Mount Haleakla, Maui, Hawaii. That’s not a pano. That’s a single frame at 11mm. 

So, do we really need to go to 11mm?. Yes! Isn’t that “too wide?” Not at all (see that image above). But to help visually display the difference, and why going crazy wide is so awesome, I took three shots from the exact same shooting position, only changing the Zoom amount so you can see what 24mm looks like, then 16mm, and finally 11mm. It’s quite a difference in how much fits in the same sense (I’m sitting in an outrigger on the beach at Mama’s Fishhouse on Father’s Day).

Above: Here’s the scene at 24mm (zoomed all the way out).

Above: Here’s the same scene at 16mm. You see a lot more palms, and more boat as well.

Above: Now here’s 11mm. Mmmmmmmmm, that’s wide, baby. Super wide! Delicious wide. Look at all the extra palms, extra boat, extra beach, etc.. It’s a whole different world.

Above: Here’s a side by side between the 24mm and 11mm shot from the exact same spot and position (click for a much larger view). All of a sudden, 24mm looks more like 50mm.

OK, I’m turning it over to Brad now (but I’ll be back at the end)
Take it away, Braddo! 

Canon has had a good variety of wide angle lenses for a while, but as a HUGE fan of super wide angle zoom lenses, I've had an itch that was almost scratched but not quite. Now with the 11-24mm f/4, that itch has been scratched very well.

As a concert photographer who is usually limited to the photo pit without a lot of room to move back and forth, zoom lenses are a life saver. That's why I was thrilled when Canon announced this new ultra wide angle lens, and even more thrilled to try it out during a couple of recent shoots.

Is there distortion on the edges? Well, sure, a little, but it's incredibly minimal! Check out the completely un-cropped images above, with no lens corrections, shot at 12mm. The guys on the edges would normally be stretched quite a bit more, especially in the first one, but this rectilinear lens handles them really well.

I also love just how close this lens allows me to get to performers who come out to the edge of the stage or come out for some crowd interaction. The musician above looks like he's still a decent distance from where I'm shooting from, right? Here's an iPhone shot from the crowd where you can see me in the lower right hand cornerâ¦


Photo by Alex Roberts

I'm probably a bit closer than you were expecting, right? My only complaint about the ultra-wideness of this lens is that it makes it difficult to keep the other photographers out of my shots!

This thing is a bit of a beast though, coming in at 2.6 pounds (for comparison, another one of Canon's wide-angle zoom lenses is 1.35 pounds), so it can add a little weight to your pack and shoulders. But for the results, it's totally worth it to me.

I didn't see any noticeable chromatic aberration in the images, and I have no complaints on edge to edge sharpness even its widest points.

This thing handles lens flare like a champ. Normally in a shot like the one above, with the sun beaming directly into the lens, you'd be lucky to see much of anything. But here you just get a little bit of flare near the headstock of the guitar.

As with any lens with a rounded front element, you'll want to make sure you keep a lens cloth handy for the occasional accidental finger smudge. The built-in lens hood does help prevent that, plus it's never going to fall off and get lost during a shoot.

So, is this lens worth it for music photographers? If you're a fan of the ultra-wide look, then absolutely!

OK, Scott back again 
Many thanks to Brad for sharing this thoughts and pics (and thanks for getting me the lens before I had to head back home). ;-)

Let’s wrap up with some specs (from B&H’s site)

Dimensions: Approx. 4.3 x 5.2″ (109.22 x 132.08 mm)
Weight: 2.6 lb (1.18 kg)
Price  (B&H Photo): $2,999

Here’s a link with all the details and stuff.

I super-mega dig this lens, and you’ll be seeing a lot of it this coming football season from me (yes, I know it’s perfect for landscape and architectural photography, but apparently it works awesome for concerts and travel, too and I imagine it will be insane for remote football shots and celebrations after the game, and I can’t wait to share that stuff with you in just about 8 or 9 weeks).

That’s it for our field report. Hope you all have a great Tuesday! :)

Best,

-Scott (and Brad!) 

Taming Natural Light with Erik Valind
Natural light is all around us, but it is up to the photographer to control it in order to make a beautiful portrait. Join Erik Valind as he shows you how to tame that natural light, from direct noontime sun to overcast and shadowless days, and capture killer portraits with little more than just your camera and a reflector. No speedlights or strobes are required for this class. Erik teaches you about the factors that you can control, and then walks you various techniques you can use through a series of real world demonstrations, each one building on the last, that will give you the skills to start seeing and using natural light in new ways. Click here to see the first lesson of this class for free!

Getting Started with Dreamweaver with Janine Warner
Take control of your website by learning Dreamweaver CC. Join Janine Warner, author of Dreamweaver for Dummies, as she teaches you the basic skills every Dreamweaver user needs to know to start building and managing a website. Whether you are completely new to Dreamweaver or just looking for a refresher, Janine will take you step-by-step through the process of setting up a simple website, creating new pages, adding and formatting text, inserting images, controlling the layout, and then linking it all together. By the end of the class you'll have the foundational skills you need to take you to the next level.  Click here to see the first lesson of this class for free!

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, or Ben Willmore live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they're coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
July 14 - London, UK
Sept 22 - Phoenix, AZ
Sept 28 - Austin, TX

The Moment It Clicks with Joe McNally
July 13 - Ottawa, ON
July 15 - Calgary, AB
July 17 - Toronto, ON
Aug 21 - Orlando, FL
Aug 24 - Miami, FL

Lightroom & Photoshop Creative Integration Tour with Ben Willmore
Aug 4 - Kansas City, MO
Aug 6 - St. Louis, MO
Aug 26 - Charlotte, NC

These are just some of the upcoming dates for these seminar tours. You can find the full calendar of events right here, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Deacon Blues

If that’s you, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

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