Posts By Brad Moore Scott Kelby on the Canon 7D Mark II First sports photographer Peter Read Miller shared his thoughts on the new 7D Mark II, then wildlife photographer Adam Jones shared his thoughts. Now Scott Kelby shares why he thinks this camera is a game changer! Between the incredible high ISO quality, 10fps frame rate, autofocus system, and affordability, this camera allows photographers to shoot things that they previously would've needed a more expensive body (and much larger budget) to shoot. The Canon 7D Mark II is now shipping, so if this camera is one you want to add to your camera bag, you can order it now from B&H Photo! A Photographer's Guide To Rome with Scott Kelby Is a visit to Rome on your bucket list? Consider this your travel guide on where to go for the best photographs of this beautiful and historic…

SHOOTING PARIS LIKE A PARISIAN PHOTOGRAPHER First I want to thank Scott Kelby for having me as a guest blogger. Scott has been so important in my life as a photographer. I have learned all my photography basics with the use of Scott’s books back in 2005. His books were the easiest and funniest to understand. We later on became friends and he has helped me a lot to grow as a teacher and a photographer through the years. He has such a big heart, you don’t feel small around him; this is a quality that is very rare nowadays. I got the idea of making this article because most of the emails I receive daily are people asking for advises on where to shoot in Paris. Paris is a big city and there are tons of photo opportunities. It is one of the… Wildlife Photographer Adam Jones on The Canon 7D Mark II Wildlife photographer Adam Jones talks with KelbyOne's Mia McCormick about his thoughts on the new Canon 7D Mark II. Adam talks about how shooting high ISO has helped him get free from his tripod and shoot handheld. Adam also talks about the crop factor and how it benefits the way he shoots. If you've been itching to get some hands-on time with this new camera, you'll be able to this week at PhotoPlus Expo in NYC! Just swing by the Canon booth on the expo floor and try it out for yourself today, tomorrow, or Saturday. KelbyOne at Photo Plus Expo KelbyOne is at the Photo Plus Expo today through Saturday! Come find us at booth #473 where we have some of our world-renowned instructors on hand teaching and sharing some amazing tips. Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski are…

The Passionate Photographer – A Life Obsessed
All I ever wanted to do was take pictures. I love photography. My tagline says "obsessed by all things photographic" and it's true.

When I was 16, I spent a summer riding around my suburban Montreal home on a 70cc motorcycle, an all-mechanical Nikon FM/35mm lens dangling from my neck. I was documenting community life for a local weekly newspaper long since gone. Even better, I got paid for it. As good as it gets I thought.

Years later, I graduated university with a journalism degree, and I couldn't wait to aim my camera at issues I thought were important.

Fast forward ten great; sometimes-frustrating; always-stimulating years as a news photographer, I was finding it difficult to stay fresh and challenged. Daily assignments had made me a skilled and swift-working photographer, but I had become impatient, often retreating within my comfort zone, feeling forced to work in a formulaic fashion because of time constraints. I was ready for a photographic break-through, a way to slow down and find a way back to the innocence of vision and joy I had as a young guy cruising around town with my camera.

If there's one concept I want to convey in my guest post (thanks Scott and Brad for the opportunity), it's that the most rewarding part of the photographic process often comes when you find a project or theme you feel passion for, one you can dig into, and challenge yourself to create a set of pictures.

Finding Your Passion
Directing your photographic energy and passion towards a story or theme is something I feel confident will lead you toward becoming the photographer you want to be. It is passion that will take you there…if you let it.

But you have to find the subject matter that inspires you to commit and drives you to work hard, moving past frustrations and through obstacles, pushing towards a photographic place of competence and excitement you cannot even imagine as you read this.

In the evolution of a photographer, to get to the next step, liberating yourself from photographic routine, peeling away layers of traditional imagery to get to the core of your photographic soul is to be honest and ask, "What is it I am trying to say through my photography?"

Diane Arbus said something to the effect of "the more personal you make it, the more universal it becomes."

What a powerful and liberating thought. In my experience it's dead on.

Photography is a universal language and the more honest and revealing you are, the more viewers will respond to the work. If you stop trying to make images that look like what you think strong photography is supposed to look like and instead look inward, aiming your camera at the things most personal to you, following your curiosity â”your work will be elevated. Honesty and passion shine through.

Story ideas can come from anywhere. I tend to read as much as I can, looking at blogs, magazines, news sites, reading books, listening to music, visiting galleries, looking at the work of other artists and photographers. But many of my best ideas come from my own life. Personal experience and exploring your own connections often yield some of the best and most rewarding projects.

If you're inspired by the landscape, what is it that inspires you? How does it make you feel? As you dig deep the goal is to create images that make the viewer feel something, maybe discovering what you already know about the place. In other words, images that transcend the literal and become more lyrical.

Consider putting together a set of images for a book or exhibition, even if that exhibition is in your own living room. The challenge of creating a set of pictures is to make each piece strong, yet when put together in a very deliberate way, the message communicated is often bigger and more complex than any individual piece can convey on its own. The sum is greater than the parts.

The process of assembling, sequencing and showing a set of pictures will force you to make tough decisions. If two images are similar, you need to choose the strongest one or the image that adds to or moves the communication of the project further. Some projects, use repetition as a way to build momentum, a portrait series for example. Regardless, it's like peeling an onion, you get deeper and deeper, and start to make images that scratch and dig below the literal surface to photographic places new and exciting.

It's no mystery that when you go through a volume of work, you learn from your experience and you get better. And because you're passionate about the work, you will work harder and longer; putting in the time.

More comprehensive coverage yields stronger, deeper, and more interesting work. If your story involves people, for example, they often get more comfortable with you as time goes by, relaxing and letting their guard down to reveal more of themselves for you to c!apture. Shooting more helps improve your skills and makes you a better photographer.

For two summers, I went on a road trip from Maine to Alaska and I never looked back. Even though it has never been published, The America At The Edge Project changed my life.

Of course, all big ideas start with a small step, and securing your idea is what you need to do first. Don't over think it, you won't know for sure that your idea is executable until you start the process of shooting.

What Personal Projects Have Taught Me
All my projects turn into amazing adventures. Personal projects have taught me so much. I have shared my process in my book The Passionate Photographer and now in this post. I'm sure much of my process will sound familiar to you.

New KelbyOne Website and New Blog! We have a brand new design on our website and it looks really sleek. But more importantly, it's super easy to navigate and find the classes and instructors you are looking for. That's over on AND, we have a brand new blog with all kinds of photography and photoshop related content. We have contributors from all over and all kinds of industry related news and info. Check that out over at How To Shoot Tack Sharp Images with Matt Kloskowski One of the most important skills for a photographer to master is how to capture the sharpest, most in-focus image possible when taking a photo. Join Matt Kloskowski as he takes you through all of the factors you need to consider in order to nail tack sharp photos every time. Matt covers everything from how to hold the camera correctly to…

Photo by Nadra Farina-Hess My name is Alan Hess and I love being a photographer. I am really lucky that I get to photograph things for a living. As the house photographer for a large indoor arena in San Diego I get to capture some of the biggest names in music like Cher, The Who, Taylor Swift, Justin Beiber, as well as other events like the NBA, MMA, and the WWE. This year we will also have a Professional Bull Rider event. But even with the wide variety of events I get to shoot, once in a while I still find myself in a creative rut. That’s where personal projects come in. For me, that is taking photos of my dogs. I have two rescued boxers. They make for great subjects for a couple of reasons. They are always available since they live with…