Posts By Brad Moore

http://youtu.be/sISU0_YvsXA

Wildlife Photographer Adam Jones on The Canon 7D Mark II
Wildlife photographer Adam Jones talks with KelbyOne’s Mia McCormick about his thoughts on the new Canon 7D Mark II. Adam talks about how shooting high ISO has helped him get free from his tripod and shoot handheld. Adam also talks about the crop factor and how it benefits the way he shoots.

If you’ve been itching to get some hands-on time with this new camera, you’ll be able to this week at PhotoPlus Expo in NYC! Just swing by the Canon booth on the expo floor and try it out for yourself today, tomorrow, or Saturday.

KelbyOne at Photo Plus Expo
KelbyOne is at the Photo Plus Expo today through Saturday! Come find us at booth #473 where we have some of our world-renowned instructors on hand teaching and sharing some amazing tips. Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski are around, and Pete Collins is showing his amazing "photo spin" technique for some awesome kids portraits. Jay Maisel will be at the booth, along with Roberto ValenzuelaPeter HurleyBrian SmithTamara Lackey⦠the whole gang. Please stop by and say hi! And, if you aren’t here for the show, be sure to check in on the blog for show updates throughout the Expo - KelbyOne.com/blog

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Camera Basics Classes from KelbyOne
This past week we added some new Camera Basics classes for the Nikon D5300, Canon 6D, BlackMagic Design Pocket Cinema, and BlackMagic Production 4K cameras over at KelbyOne! If you have any of these cameras and want to make sure you know how to get the most out of them, Mia McCormick, Larry Becker, and John McQuiston will walk you through all the buttons, dials, menus, and settings you need to know. John also has you covered on getting started with the Zoom H6 audio recorder.

DSLR Filmmaking: 25 Tips in Premiere Pro
If you've got a firm foundation for editing with Premiere Pro, then it's time to up your game with Brandon Ford's 25 tips, tricks, and hints designed to make your editing workflow smoother, faster, and more efficient. Brandon covers all of the little tricks of the trade that can add up to a huge savings in time when editing a big project. Each tip is meant to stand on its own, so you can feel free to zero in on the tips that interest you the most, or work you way through each one.

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– James D.

If you’re the lucky winner, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday, and we hope to see you at PhotoPlus Expo!

The Passionate Photographer – A Life Obsessed
All I ever wanted to do was take pictures. I love photography. My tagline says "obsessed by all things photographic" and it's true.

When I was 16, I spent a summer riding around my suburban Montreal home on a 70cc motorcycle, an all-mechanical Nikon FM/35mm lens dangling from my neck. I was documenting community life for a local weekly newspaper long since gone. Even better, I got paid for it. As good as it gets I thought.

Years later, I graduated university with a journalism degree, and I couldn't wait to aim my camera at issues I thought were important.

Fast forward ten great; sometimes-frustrating; always-stimulating years as a news photographer, I was finding it difficult to stay fresh and challenged. Daily assignments had made me a skilled and swift-working photographer, but I had become impatient, often retreating within my comfort zone, feeling forced to work in a formulaic fashion because of time constraints. I was ready for a photographic break-through, a way to slow down and find a way back to the innocence of vision and joy I had as a young guy cruising around town with my camera.

If there's one concept I want to convey in my guest post (thanks Scott and Brad for the opportunity), it's that the most rewarding part of the photographic process often comes when you find a project or theme you feel passion for, one you can dig into, and challenge yourself to create a set of pictures.

Finding Your Passion
Directing your photographic energy and passion towards a story or theme is something I feel confident will lead you toward becoming the photographer you want to be. It is passion that will take you there…if you let it.

But you have to find the subject matter that inspires you to commit and drives you to work hard, moving past frustrations and through obstacles, pushing towards a photographic place of competence and excitement you cannot even imagine as you read this.

In the evolution of a photographer, to get to the next step, liberating yourself from photographic routine, peeling away layers of traditional imagery to get to the core of your photographic soul is to be honest and ask, "What is it I am trying to say through my photography?"

Diane Arbus said something to the effect of "the more personal you make it, the more universal it becomes."

What a powerful and liberating thought. In my experience it's dead on.

Photography is a universal language and the more honest and revealing you are, the more viewers will respond to the work. If you stop trying to make images that look like what you think strong photography is supposed to look like and instead look inward, aiming your camera at the things most personal to you, following your curiosity â”your work will be elevated. Honesty and passion shine through.

Story ideas can come from anywhere. I tend to read as much as I can, looking at blogs, magazines, news sites, reading books, listening to music, visiting galleries, looking at the work of other artists and photographers. But many of my best ideas come from my own life. Personal experience and exploring your own connections often yield some of the best and most rewarding projects.

If you're inspired by the landscape, what is it that inspires you? How does it make you feel? As you dig deep the goal is to create images that make the viewer feel something, maybe discovering what you already know about the place. In other words, images that transcend the literal and become more lyrical.

Consider putting together a set of images for a book or exhibition, even if that exhibition is in your own living room. The challenge of creating a set of pictures is to make each piece strong, yet when put together in a very deliberate way, the message communicated is often bigger and more complex than any individual piece can convey on its own. The sum is greater than the parts.

The process of assembling, sequencing and showing a set of pictures will force you to make tough decisions. If two images are similar, you need to choose the strongest one or the image that adds to or moves the communication of the project further. Some projects, use repetition as a way to build momentum, a portrait series for example. Regardless, it's like peeling an onion, you get deeper and deeper, and start to make images that scratch and dig below the literal surface to photographic places new and exciting.

It's no mystery that when you go through a volume of work, you learn from your experience and you get better. And because you're passionate about the work, you will work harder and longer; putting in the time.

More comprehensive coverage yields stronger, deeper, and more interesting work. If your story involves people, for example, they often get more comfortable with you as time goes by, relaxing and letting their guard down to reveal more of themselves for you to c!apture. Shooting more helps improve your skills and makes you a better photographer.

For two summers, I went on a road trip from Maine to Alaska and I never looked back. Even though it has never been published, The America At The Edge Project changed my life.

Of course, all big ideas start with a small step, and securing your idea is what you need to do first. Don't over think it, you won't know for sure that your idea is executable until you start the process of shooting.

What Personal Projects Have Taught Me
All my projects turn into amazing adventures. Personal projects have taught me so much. I have shared my process in my book The Passionate Photographer and now in this post. I'm sure much of my process will sound familiar to you.

(more…)

New KelbyOne Website and New Blog!
We have a brand new design on our website and it looks really sleek. But more importantly, it’s super easy to navigate and find the classes and instructors you are looking for. That’s over on KelbyOne.com AND, we have a brand new blog with all kinds of photography and photoshop related content. We have contributors from all over and all kinds of industry related news and info. Check that out over at kelbyone.com/blog

How To Shoot Tack Sharp Images with Matt Kloskowski
One of the most important skills for a photographer to master is how to capture the sharpest, most in-focus image possible when taking a photo. Join Matt Kloskowski as he takes you through all of the factors you need to consider in order to nail tack sharp photos every time. Matt covers everything from how to hold the camera correctly to how to leverage the features and functions of your camera to capture the sharpest images possible. Once you've got the shot, Matt takes you through a number of Lightroom and Photoshop techniques designed to make those sharply focused photos appear even sharper.

KelbyOne at Photo Plus Expo
KelbyOne will be at the Photo Plus Expo in NYC Oct 30-Nov 1. We’ll be at booth #473 and we’ll have some of our instructors on hand teaching and sharing some amazing tips. Scott Kelby and Matt Kloskowski will be around, Pete Collins will show you his amazing “photo spin” technique for some awesome kids portraits. Jay Maisel will be at the booth, along with Roberto Valenzuela, Peter Hurley, Brian Smith, Tamara Lackey… the whole gang. Please stop by and say hi! And, if you can’t make it to NYC for the show, be sure to check in on the blog for show updates throughout the Expo – KelbyOne.com/blog

Be sure to check out The University on Wednesday, October 29th at PhotoPlus Expo for a great overview of the newsest techniques in photography as well as some of the newest gear. Use the code: UNIVF and get admission to this special event for free.

Explore The University’s shooting bays for 45-minute interactive sessions by Lou Freeman, Jen Rozenbaum, Peter Hurley, and Lindsay Adler, who will focus on how to strengthen your shooting and posing techniques, and how to manage everything from speed lights to studio strobes. You’ll be handling and experimenting with some of the newest gear, all provided by The U’s official sponsors: B&H, Sigma & the MAC Group!

If you have a bit more time, be sure to check out PhotoPlus’s seminar offerings by perusing the Conference Brochure.

Create Your World The Photoshop World Image-Editing Challenge
From creative composites to beauty retouching, the Create Your World contest is looking for photographs that highlight your world through your eyes. Use Photoshop to enhance natural beauty or create the environment of your dreams.

One Grand Prize winner will receive a $2,500 cash prize, a 1-Year KelbyOne subscription, a $500 Gift Card to B&H Photo, a Full Conference Pass and a Pro Pass Plus to the 2015 Photoshop World Conference in Las Vegas, NV. Five First Place winners will receive a $500 Gift Card to B&H Photo, a 1-Year KelbyOne subscription, and a Full Conference Pass to the 2015 Photoshop World Conference in Las Vegas, NV.

For more information go to CreateYourWorldChallenge.com

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

40% Off Tutorials from Serge Ramelli
This week only, our buddy and well-known French photographer and Photoshop instructor Serge Ramelli is offering 40% off his tutorial downloads! He has courses that include commercial still life photography, landscape and sky post processing, black and white photography, Lightroom presets, Photoshop retouching and more! Head over to PhotoSerge.com and fill up your cart, then enter the promo code KELBYOCT at checkout to get your 40% off through the end of the month!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Scott J

If you’re the lucky winner, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!


Photo by Nadra Farina-Hess

My name is Alan Hess and I love being a photographer. I am really lucky that I get to photograph things for a living. As the house photographer for a large indoor arena in San Diego I get to capture some of the biggest names in music like Cher, The Who, Taylor Swift, Justin Beiber, as well as other events like the NBA, MMA, and the WWE. This year we will also have a Professional Bull Rider event. But even with the wide variety of events I get to shoot, once in a while I still find myself in a creative rut. That's where personal projects come in.

For me, that is taking photos of my dogs.

I have two rescued boxers. They make for great subjects for a couple of reasons. They are always available since they live with me. They have distinct personalities that makes photographing them more fun (or challenging). And best of all they never want to see the photos, and never complain that they don't look good. On the downside, they don't have a great attention span and can easily wonder off in the middle of the shoot, and getting them to pose can be challenging.

I started off by just trying to get a portrait shot to use as a wallpaper on my iPhone, which led to experimenting with lighting and learning how to create the invisible black background portraits. This led to creating the Fuel Book, Pet Portraits that Stand Out. This Fuel Book led to my newest full book, Pet Portraits: From Snapshots to Great Shots. This was the most fun that I have ever had writing a book since it didn't seem like work at all. I was able to take all that information I had accumulated while creating photos of my dogs and turn it into something that could help others get great photos of their pets.

First I want to tell you what this book isn't. It isn't a book on creating a pet photography business, or how to profit from taking photos of people’s pets. This book is not about having to go out and spend a lot of money on special gear. It is just about getting better photos of your pet, or any pet. I photographed dogs, cats, birds, horses, lizards, snakes, fish, hamsters, mice, rats, and bunny rabbits. I spent time at leash free areas getting to capture dogs in action as they ran, jumped and played with other dogs. I got nudged by horses and had a lizard climb all over my gear. I spent time with an exotic pet vet, and even though I did not cover spiders as pets in the book, I ended up with a tarantula crawling on my hands.

It was the most fun I have had writing a book.

I spent some time photographing big dogs at play. I find it fascinating what you can capture at 1/4000 second that you don't see when watching the action in real time. These dogs are playing together on the beach, but if you just saw the fangs you might think that it wasn't a friendly encounter.

Getting to lie in the grass and photograph a group of puppies the first time they got to roam around outside is a great way to spend a morning.

I wanted to make sure that the book dealt with all pets, and not just dogs and cats. So I tracked down a wide variety of different pet owners and rescue groups. The best part was that pet owners and rescue group volunteers are really passionate. The passion that they have for their pets is really contagious. Need a little pick-me-up? Ask a pet owner about what their pet did recently. I learned more about snakes, frogs, mice, birds and lizards in the past few months than I thought possible. Every photo shoot was a new adventure.

I spent quite a bit of time photographing cats as they are the second most popular pet in the US, right behind dogs. Cats turned out to be both easier in some respects and much more challenging in others. They love to stand in doorways and look out. Turns out that this makes for great portrait light.

It was tough to think of it as work as I lay outside watching a friend’s cat stalk his cat toy. A tough day at work.

Photographing cats became an exercise in patience. Cats can sit still for what seem like hours, then suddenly leap into action⦠or just stretch out and go right to sleep.

Getting up close and personal with a horse was really quite awesome. I was in constant awe of their power and size. Watching the muscles under their coat as the walk and run was fantastic, and getting to photograph them up close was really amazing.

On a final note, I used to think that personal projects were just a time suck. When was I supposed to go out and shoot stuff just for me and at the same time try to earn a living. There just didn't seem like enough of a payoff to spend the time shooting for myself when I could be out trying to earn a living. It got to the point where I didn't pick up my camera unless I was off to shoot something for a job…

I was wrong.

Turns out that taking the time to go out and photograph something just for me not only recharges the creative side but can lead to other work.

You can pick up your copy of the Pet Photography: From Snapshots to Great Shots from Peachpit (use the code PETSHOTS to save 35%), Amazon, or Barnes & Noble.

You can find out more about Alan and his work at AlanHessPhotography.com, and follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

http://youtu.be/O4DJjWdujdg

Trailblazers: Powerful Women of Photography with Erika Larsen
Erika Larsen is a contributor to National Geographic Magazine, and her work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC, but it is her dedication to immersing herself in the cultures that she is seeking to understand that is so inspiring. Erika literally lives and breathes the cultures she photographs, and sets out not as an outsider seeking to tell the story of another culture to the world, but rather as an individual seeking to deeply understand the people and their way of life. She sees her role as a photographer to be 100% present in the experience she is having, and if she is 100% there, then the shots create themselves.

You can see her interview with Mia McCormick, and the rest of the Trailblazers series for free right here.

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Oct 17 - Charlotte, NC (Tomorrow!)
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Oct 22 - Colorado Springs, CO
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Oct 20 - Chicago, IL
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Rental
– DGV

KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Jose G

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!


Photo by Melissa Niu

I am passionate about photography. By that I mean, photography bugs the living crap out of me and nags at me when I don't end up having the time to satisfy the craving that I have for it. It drives me crazy. It keeps me up at night. Frustrated. Photography frustrates to the point that I become helpless and want to lash out at the world for the inability to properly express what I envision in my mind, my heart, or my eyes.

And I love it: this calming expression when you're at peace with it. I love it so much that I strive to continually exercise the part of my lungs that pumps in the oxygen directly to the fire that burns within meâ”that fire that makes me want to keep trying to pursue and refine this ability to create, capture and envision. But occasionally, the pumping slows down; the fire dwindles and I lose sight, feeling, and the desire to put in the effort that my body innately knows that I need to exude. Depression kicks in; feeling discouragement from others and feeling doubtful that I'll ever be able to possess the abilities that I so greatly desire, the fire dwindles even more. But yet it is one of my passions, and as such, I don't–no, I can't give up.

Over the years, I realized that my passion never actually burns out completely; it only gets smothered. I'm an ordinary guy with a pretty busy life. I'm single, working a job, going back to college, and trying to make photography an even bigger part of my life, perhaps back into full-time photo work. I have fears, time constraints, friends, family and church, and other obligations that often push photography into an afterthought. Although it's an afterthought, it is substantial. It means that there is still enough bandwidth in my brain to pay attention to it and not have it written offâ”a sign of how I knew it was my passion.

Refueling the passion that I have has changed my lifestyle over the past couple months, especially since I've been focusing on this outlet.

I'll admit that making changes has been hard, but I've found that there are a few things that have made it easier to integrate the camera into my life and kindle the passion.

1. Surround yourself with people that inspire you.
Don't go and hastily ditch your current circle of friends⦠that's entirely not what I mean, although in some cases, that may be necessary. Seeing that most people are willfully submissive to their phones, I'd suggest filling your news feed with inspiring artists, photographers and creative people that gel with you and your style. If you're anything like me, not only will your appreciation of photography increase, but your desire to become as good as those who you follow. It'll also give you a chance to network with friends that have similar interests.

2. Share why you do photography.
Find someone that you're close to and share with them your "why." If you haven't figured out your "why," then now is a good time to think on it.  Everyone's will probably be different, but it really doesn't matter. It's the fact that you're trying to express how you feel about what you want to do. As you think upon, define, and share your "why" you'll subtly increase your motivation. Here's a tip for defining your "why:" think past the whole idea of "I do it because I want to." Think about how it makes you feel and why you find it important. It may be hard at first, especially when you're trying to put it words.

3. Integrate the camera into your life.
I'm really into portraits. It's my jam. Just because I love shooting people shouldn't restrict from occasionally shoot what I'm experiencing in life. I sold my heavy, expensive and really great Canon 5D Mark III and replaced it with my Fujifilm X-T1, a smaller more portable and equally just as great camera. I've found that I've been able to have my camera available at the most random times that I end up feeling inspired. There are days that I don't take it out of my bag, but on those days, I'm reminded that at least I had it on me just in case something caught my eye. My cousin, a street photographer in Taiwan, told me, "I think only when you are able to carry your camera around, will photography truly blend into your life, express who you are, and respond to how you perceive the world."

4. Make the time to attend workshops.
Many of those really inspiring people that you've hopefully added to your Facebook and Instagram feeds hold gatherings where you can learn, apply and get inspired. I got excited recently from a workshop that I took from The Wild Ones, a non-profit organization that was put on by creative and inspiring photographers. My friend Enrique ended up sharing it with meâ”and for that, I'm grateful. At this specific workshop, I witnessed a technique I had known about but had never applied. It opened my eyes to different thought processes and got me amped to go out and shoot and try it out. There were many more personal experiences that occurred, which I'm sure you'd have the chance to have. Many workshops may also provide business tips that could help inspire that business side of photography that often burns people out as well. I realized how much of a value it was to be physically surrounded by like-minded people who are all interested and engaged in same interest.

5. Keep your eyes open.
Every time I came across a concept, an idea or something otherwise inspirational, I'd make note of itâ”mentally or digitally. At the end of the night, I make/add to a list of things that I wanted to shootâ”even when I know it'll be a while before I'm able to shoot it. I know that at some point I'll have the gratification of checking something off that list. This goes hand in hand with creating personal projects.

Not sure of the difference between a passion and a hobby?
My mother always told me that photography is just a hobby. Heh. It's not "just a hobby."

It isn't something that I do for just for leisure and it isn't something that I do on the side of my normal occupation to help me relieve stress. It's a passion. To put it in terms that she'd understandâ”I'd relate it to relationships.

A hobby is a hookup, a booty-callâ”something non-committal. They're fun, they're mostly relaxing, and they aren't something that you'd keep around once hardship hits. You'll ditch it once you're dissatisfied with it.

Unlike hobbies, you won't want to leave passions alone. You'll want to incorporate it into your life as much as possible. It'll demand much, and you won't mind giving it all. You will make sacrifices and also work through the difficulties that arise so that this passion can continue and flourish. And you love it.

The intensity of the passion will fluctuate, but it will always be thereâ”and like other passions, it is worth working for.

Get obsessed! Get incorporated, connected and become yet again passionate about what you do and want to do. Go out and shoot.

You can see more of Mykii’s work at MykiiLiu.com, and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, Photofocus, and Instagram.

Close