Posts By Brad Moore

http://youtu.be/ZxZw7MI6GUg

The 7th Annual Scott Kelby Worldwide Photo Walk
We’re just a couple of days away from the world’s largest social photography event, the Worldwide Photo Walk! If you haven’t already signed up to take part in this event, there’s still time. Just head to WorldwidePhotoWalk.com and search for a walk in your area. It’s a fun event that’s focused on photography, but also on the social aspect of things. Doesn’t matter if you have a top-of-the-line DSLR, a point-and-shoot, or a cell phone camera… Everyone is welcome! Not only that, but anyone who participates can enter the contest for a chance to win some great prizes, including a Canon 70D kit, Canon PIXMA PRO-1 printer, Adobe Creative Cloud membership, Wacom Intuos tablet, B&H gift cards, Tamron 28-300mm lens, and much more!

A Photographer’s Guide To Paris with Scott Kelby & RC Concepcion
If you're planning a trip to Paris (or just dreaming of one), then consider this your travel guide on where to go for the best photographs of this iconic city. On and off the beaten path, Scott Kelby shares his favorite locations along with the kind of veteran traveler tips that will help you capture images that you'll be delighted to bring back home. Timing is everything, so you'll not only learn where to go, but what times will yield the best chances for great photographs. This is strictly a travel guide for photographers, so there's no Photoshop or Lightroom involved, just the kind of information that will aid you on your photographic journey and inspire you to get out there and shoot.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Oct 10 - Westminster, London, UK (tomorrow!)
Oct 17 - Charlotte, NC
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Oct 22 - Colorado Springs, CO
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Oct 20 - Chicago, IL
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Oct 7 - Raleigh, NC
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Squarespace 7 Is Here!
Here at Kelby Media Group, we LOVE Squarespace! It makes creating a website, blog, or portfolio incredibly fast and easy, especially if you just want to click a few options and get a beautiful, simple website in no time at all. We’re excited to share that they’ve launched the beta for their new backend, Squarespace 7! This is a brand new interface for our content management system that greatly enhances the usability of our existing web publishing platform. Squarespace 7 makes some significant design improvements to the site management features of Squarespace 6, but most of it will feel familiar if you’ve used Squarespace in the past two years. You can easily enable Squarespace 7 for your existing site by turning on a simple toggle.

If you’re not already using Squarespace, you can pick a template and start a 14-day free trial right here.

Last Week’s Winners
KelbyOne Rentals
– joe t
- Neoh Soon Hueng

KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Michael Scott

If you're one of the lucky winners, we'll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!


Photo by Robert Deutsch

Do your pictures speak to you?

If you’re feeling a dry spell in your creativity or you’re undecided about what personal project might wow your next client, it’s a curious but valuable question.

What happens often as photographers is we get caught up in tools of the trade. Not everyone obviously, but with so many eye-popping advances in technology we drift towards how we can manipulate, control and shape our images. We tell our pictures what to say.

It makes perfect sense. If you’re trying to stay ahead, so much has to measure up. Who wants to take chances with pictures when a client’s expectations are at stake? More control, less risk. So we previsualize, research, come up with shot lists, use photo actions and tools. With a flourish of creativity, we finish. The results can be beautiful.

But this is all very much directed by you the photographer, in a process that can become so perfected and controlled that it becomes stale. Perhaps that’s why, at a portfolio review, you might be asked after you have bared the fruits of all your labor, “Do you have any personal projects to show?”

Editors and art buyers want to be surprised by someone’s individual passions and creativity. They want to lasso a star.

If you feel like you’re producing well-crafted widgets with your photography, or if you’re casting about for a personal project to get your passions going on, let me make a suggestion that I try to follow myself.

Let your pictures speak.

What the heck do I mean?  I’ve been a photojournalist for over twenty years, and I’ve done a lot of conscious picture-taking. Before I compose a picture, I’m thinking of my subject, my audience, my editors, and the reporter’s story. I’m trying to find and make pictures that will sing in the space provided but within the constraints of expectations and needs of the job.

So, tired by all the control I was exerting, I decided to do the thing that I kept putting off. I decided to explore my family roots in Cuba…without pictures.

What happened next set in motion a chain of events that forever changed my perceptions of photography and the direction of my career.

Unlike everyone else who goes to Cuba, especially through numerous destination workshops, I didn’t want to take pictures and turn the island into a photo project. I didn’t go to take photos of cigars, cars and decrepit buildings like everyone else.

I wanted to meet family that no one in my U.S. family had seen in about forty years. I took a camera, but more to take visual notes and to photograph family.

Yet, every time I felt an emotional chord strike, I would take a picture and move on.

It wasn’t an emotional family homecoming. That’s the stereotypical narrative for a returning family member. But too much time had passed. Politics intervened. My experience was a bit disjointed and sometimes awkward.

I was troubled by my experience. I came back and put away my pictures for 6 months.

But my unconscious had a few things to say. Still needing to process the experience, I went through and selected every picture that rang an emotional chord, even if I didn’t understand why.

I laid them out together and was shocked to see that the pictures had a voice that I wasn’t eager to hear. They told me this:

I was a stranger. It was also a strange land to me. I was a stranger in a strange land.

Yeesh. So much for feeling closer to my family.

Fast forward years later, I found myself at the presidential palace, face-to-face with Cuban President Fidel Castro.

How did that happen?

After what my pictures said on my first trip, I responded. I kept returning to the island, ultimately risking a staff job at the Los Angeles Times to ask for a leave of absence to study in Cuba for six months.

After the L.A. Times, I came to the Chicago Tribune, with extensive Cuba experience. Shortly after, the Tribune was the first U.S. newspaper in forty years to receive permission to open a bureau on the island. I jumped into my editor's office. He could sense my passion.

So there I was at the presidential palace, getting ready to photograph our CEO and the Cuban president, shaking hands at the inauguration of the bureau.

On that trip, that lasted a couple months, I produced a sports picture essay that won a World Press Photo award. That award led to book projects and other opportunities.

I’ve left newspapering since then, but it was still a personal and professional highpoint in my career that is still bearing fruit.

But it all started with exploring a personal interest that, honestly, was unsettling.

While at the Tribune, I wrote a weekly column about photography that was gathered into my recent book Depth of Field: Tips on Photojournalism and Creativity.  I write about personal projects and the psychology of picture-taking because our unconscious behavior is either helping or hindering us.

So yes, I know, it sounds woogie to say,”Let your pictures speak to you.”

But when you do, and respond, it could add a missing personal dimension to your photography that others are hungry to see.

Alex Garcia is a Chicago-based editorial and commercial photographer with over twenty years experience as a photojournalist at the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune. He is a frequent lecturer, author and public speaker. His recent book is “Depth of Field: Tips on Photojournalism and Creativity.” You can see more of his work at AlexanderGarcia.com, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

The Business Side of Mike Kubeisy
Join KelbyOne’s own Larry Becker as he sits down with entertainment photographer Mike Kubeisy to discuss the business side of Mike’s commercial photography career in Hollywood. Larry and Mike discuss topics ranging from how to get started in the business to how to keep yourself on the cutting edge of new trends and technology. Drawing from over 30 years of experience, Mike shares some of his best advice for achieving success and living your dream.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

The Art of Digital Photography: The Inspirational Series with Mike Kubeisy
Join Mia McCormick as she sits down for an inspirational chat with Mike Kubeisy, a motion picture and stills photographer based in Hollywood. Over the course of an hour Mike and Mia touch on topics ranging from getting started in the industry to finding sources of inspiration from the energy and creativity on set, and on the importance of living a meaningful life to the role of personal projects that help you explore your ideas and build your portfolio. After 30 years in Hollywood Mike has an amazing number of stories and experiences that have shaped who he is as a person as well as his photography.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

Photoshop Camera Raw Tutorials on LayersMagazine.com
Scott Kelby recently shared some tutorials on Using the Histogram to Learn What the Sliders Do in Photoshop Camera Raw and Four Ways to Create Contrast in Adobe Photoshop Camera Raw over at LayersMagazine.com. If you’re looking to get the most out of your post processing time, these are some helpful tips that can lead to even greater looking images than you’ve been able to create before!

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Oct 10 - Westminster, London, UK
Oct 17 - Charlotte, NC
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Oct 22 - Colorado Springs, CO
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Oct 20 - Chicago, IL
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Oct 7 - Raleigh, NC
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

http://youtu.be/WgwDYbCdw0I

Jason Joseph – Six Beats of Separation
This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Music is a way for people to bond – its vibrations help the bridge the gap between us. In uncomfortable times, it can be the common vibrations of a mutual bond. In this discussion, Jason unveils his new charity project, “Six Beats of Separation,” a photo series which captures the moods of celebrities, attached to specific moments in music. Portrait photographer Jason Joseph has captured images of personalities from A-list celebrities to the homeless of Penn Station. It is his mission to create “WOW!” moments, for children from age 8 to 108.

Last Week’s Winners
Corey Barker’s New Orleans Seminar
– Van

KelbyOne Class Rentals
– Seth Strohecker
– Mike VanKirk

KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Matt C.

If you're one of the lucky winners, we'll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

It’s the Destination

As a photographer, chances are you’ve thought about doing some traveling, if you haven’t traveled extensively already. The journey might start out as a simple weekend getaway after a few rough days at the office or as an expansive road trip through several states and time zones: car packed with a camera and a few favorites lenses, wind in your hair, sun on your face, nothing but freedom and the open road in front of you. Over time this could lead to dealing with travel agents, passports, guides, and epic expeditions to the other side of the world involving multiple flights and a bone-jarring ride in the back of a rusted out Japanese pickup with a driver who speaks a different language than your own. Photographers are particularly susceptible to the lure of the exotic.

You could live right across the street from a premier national park with hundreds of square miles of mountain wilderness, waterfalls, charismatic wildlife, pristine beaches, wildflowers in the spring, blazing foliage in the fall - this is the cosmic photo destination we're talking about – and you would still feel as if you were missing out on something somewhere.

It would be far too easy to dismiss this urge as a misguided grass-is-always-greener human impulse. After all, maybe the grass really is greener on the other side of the proverbial fence. Maybe the grass over there isn’t even green at all, but some other color you’ve never seen or even considered. Maybe the grass is wild and untamed, unlike the neatly manicured turf in your tidy neighborhood with which you’re so accustomed. Then again, sticking with the working theme here, maybe it’s not really about the grass at all but the journey.

I said, maybe. You see, I personally consider the whole it’s the journey not the destination sentiment as just another feel good, pop-culture pseudo-profundity that's too easily taken at face value. The actual journey, for all the saccharin and nostalgia it conjures, actually sucks. If I could close my eyes, snap my fingers, and magically teleport myself to the destination instantaneously, while skipping the whole journey thing, I’d be happy as a clam. I'm guessing that whoever penned this particular piece of bumper sticker wisdom never had their precious little journey take them through a major 21st century airport. And yes I do realize the phrase is a derivative of Emerson's and a well-intentioned metaphor for life. Yet all too often it's used literally by slick travel brochures and cruise operators and I, for one, am tired of hearing about the journey's so-called virtues.

I do find it ironic that the most blissful photogenic destinations on the planet require you to first travel through hell on Earth in order to reach them: canceled and delayed flights, missed connections, lost luggage, fees for checked bags, long lines at the check-in counter, security, passport control, and customs, rude and surly customer service representatives, invasive TSA agents, full-body x-rays, pat downs, no liquids or gels, removed shoes, crowded airplanes, no leg room, airline food, and fights with attendants about your camera pack that won't quite fit in the overhead bin but is too fragile to allow apathetic baggage handlers to throw from luggage cart onto mobile conveyor belt are just some of the indignities to be endured and we've not even mentioned the repulsive edifices themselves. The English writer and humorist, Douglas Adams observed that there is no language that has ever produced the phrase as pretty as an airport.

But all the agony and pulverizing boredom of travel itself soon fade from memory once a destination is finally reached. So why do we photographers bother to travel anyway? I suppose everyone has their own personal reasons: capturing and seeing something new, exploration, adventure, enlightenment, different cultures and food, or running from the law - just to name a few. And while all of the preceding could apply to me as well (aside from the running from the law part) I should mention that it also happens to be my job. I haven't quite mastered the art of keeping a straight face as I explain to friends and loved ones that I'm "going to work" when I pack my bags for some far-flung, exotic photography trip but I do deserve at least some credit for not employing the smug rejoinder, "but somebody's gotta do it" or something to that effect.

And while I understand "getting away from it all," as a justification for some people's travel bug, it's one that's never quite resonated with me. I just don't see my life and work as anything from which I need, or want, to escape.

But more than any other reason, travel takes me away from everything that's familiar and razes the personal comfort zone to which I - and all of us respectively, really – try to cling. I like that. Sometimes I need that. Travel writer, Freyda Stark once wrote, "To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the most pleasant sensations in the world" and I could not concur more. When applied to photography, these strange new places and experiences act as powerful catalysts to help get my creative juices going and force me to think and see differently. After all, if I've never seen something before, what other choice do I have?

Then there are the places and scenes that are simply too beautiful for words, which is fortunate enough since we photographers are paid to create imagery where words alone are inadequate. The first time I laid my eyes on the southern Andes of Patagonia or the aurora borealis or a herd of mammoth elephants marching ceremoniously across the African plains, my sympathetic nervous system shot into overdrive and delivered a dose of goose bumps all over my arms and shoulders, making the hair stand straight up on the back of my neck. The very best part of this sensation was that in each instance, I never saw it coming. Each and every time was like a thunderbolt from the blue.

If I don't screw things up too badly, I might create something that invites the viewer of the image to participate in this new experience as well, through the prism of my emotional response and photographic technique. Since I am interpreting the experience artistically, it's still my experience but the viewer has traveled with me vicariously, except without all the burdens of modern day travel I described earlier.

Or I could forget to remove the lens cap and everyone will just have to take my word for it. Either way, if I don't make the journey in order to witness it myself, it never happened - for any of us. So the journey is necessary, if not a necessary evil. In fact, with the right attitude – and good set of noise-canceling headphones – the journey itself might not be so intolerable after all. Just don’t let anyone tell you it’s not about the destination.

*     *     *     *

Richard Bernabe is a landscape, wildlife, travel photographer and author as well as Contributing Editor to Popular Photography Magazine. You can see more of Richard's work at RichardBernabe.com\ and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Corey Barker's Photoshop Down & Dirty Master FX Seminar Tour
Come spend the day with Corey Barker, the award-winning designer, illustrator and also best-selling author of the book "Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks, Volume 2" as he brings concepts, images and ideas from his book to life in this one-day live training seminar.

Join him as he ventures to take your Photoshop skills to the next level and beyond by teaching you how to master the eye-popping techniques used by designers, artists, and photographers all over the world. You will never look at Photoshop the same way again! Don't miss your chance to spend an entire day learning from one of the best Photoshop instructors. You'll be amazed at what you can learn in just one day. Guaranteed!

Catch Corey in New Orleans on October 3, and leave a comment here for your chance to win a free ticket!

Wacom Tablets for Photographers with Wes Maggio
Looking to get the most out of your Wacom pen tablet, or just wondering what benefits a tablet can bring to your photography workflow? Then join Wes Maggio, Senior Evangelist for Creative Products at Wacom, for an in-depth look at how a pen tablet can help you bring out the best in your images and do it more efficiently than any other input device. A pen tablet provides a level of control that is just not possible to obtain with a mouse or trackpad. In this class Wes carefully explains the principles behind pen input and pressure sensitivity, then walks you through a series of practical photographic examples that demonstrates the strengths of a tablet workflow. Along the way you will learn how to customize the settings to fit your needs, how to take advantage of multi-touch input and functions, how to use a tablet in a dual-display environment, and what to consider when choosing the right tablet for your workflow.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

Motion Graphics in Photoshop CC with Corey Barker
This class with Corey Barker gets you up and running with creating motion graphics and video clips entirely in Photoshop using the newly enhanced timeline panel and keyframe based animation. Learn quick and easy tricks to getting high-end broadcast style motion graphics and animations including animating in 3D!

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Matt Kloskowski, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Sept 26 - Houston, TX (Tomorrow!)
Oct 1 - Orlando, FL
Oct 10 - Westminster, London, UK
Oct 17 - Charlotte, NC
Dec 1 - Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Power of One Flash with Joe McNally
Sept 24 - Cleveland, OH
Nov 6 - Washington, DC
Dec 9 - San Diego, CA

The Lightroom LIVE Tour with Matt Kloskowski
Sept 29 - Livonia, MI
Oct 22 - Colorado Springs, CO
Nov 4 - Philadelphia, PA
Dec 5 - San Antonio, TX

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Oct 20 - Chicago, IL
Nov 7 - Los Angeles, CA

The Photoshop Creativity Tour with Ben Willmore
Sept 22 - Arlington, TX
Oct 7 - Raleigh, NC
Nov 10 - Toronto, ON
Dec 12 - Phoenix, AZ

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through the end of the year. Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

David Ziser Clearance Sale
David Ziser is having his FIRST EVER MASSIVE CLEARANCE SALE at the Digital Resource Center! Everything must go and is priced at 50 – 80% OFF! Books, DVDs, bundles, and more are available for the lowest prices they’ve ever set, so head on over and grab what you can before it’s all gone.

Last Week’s Winners
Shoot Like A Pro Seminar Ticket
– marco miliani

KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Chris Mc

If you're one of the lucky winners, we'll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

I believe there's opportunity for everyone to have commercial success as a photographer in today's market. This as long as they have a unique and honest perspectiveâ¦

Hi!

I'm excited to be writing for Scott Kelby and the Guest blog Wednesday!

I'm also excited about the current state of photography!

Really excited!

Daily I get questions through e-mail and social media. They span a wide range but the BIG question I get asked, among practical advice on gear, computers and offers of coffee and beer is: "How do I MAKE it as a photographer?"

"How do I break into advertising photography and how do you get the jobs that you do?"

To be honest, I asked myself the same question for years as I attempted to break into the world of advertisingâ¦

If you are at a point where you have absorbed tons of photographic knowledge through school or online learning, know photo is your passion and you want to make this your career, it's not unusual to ask yourself…

Now what?

How does one get hired to do this thing you are so crazy passionate about??

There's a lot of writing in social media and the blogosphere about how hard and competitive it is to succeed as a full-time photographer. So I thought I'd use this time to share some optimism and give a different perspective about the things that excite me about the opportunities in photography today.

What I believe is this; there are opportunities for everyone to have commercial success as a photographer in today's market.

This as long as they have a unique and honest perspectiveâ¦

Before I get into this, I want to give you a brief background on what I do and share some signature images of mine that represents who I am as a photographer.

In short I'm a Norwegian photographer who, since 1995, been residing in the US.

I got started in photography by being curious…

There were a few friends that had cameras and I joined them in a darkroom course while in the National Defense in Norway.

At the time I skied a lot and started taking pictures of my friends floating through powder and flying off cliffs. Out of these adventures on the ski slopes came my first published pictures and marked the start of me as a photographer.

Later, at 22, when faced with the crossroads of "What do I do with my life?" I decided to study photography. Through great advice and some random encounters I ended up in San Francisco at the Academy of Art University where I studied photography for 4 years, earning a BFA.

From there, I was a camera assistant for almost 3 years before venturing out on my own, starting my photography businessâ¦

Going slow in the beginning, I steadily matured in my style and integrity as a photographer and now consistently shoot for the most familiar companies and brands in the world.

So why am I excited about this market that seems to get tougher by the minute?

Clients are paying less and less and there's more and more photographers being educated from colleges and online training programs.

How can I be really excited about this?

To be honest it's mostly taking a different perspective.

What if we view this from the top rather than the bottom?

If we look at the shallow end of the photography market there are too many photographers that are all underbidding each other and no one seems to be making a good living.

The view from the top is very different:

We are now living in the most visual culture ever!

The collective level and sophistication of photography is increasing every day and there's quite obviously an increasing place for images in our lives. As influencers and tastemakers we as photographers now have something that's increasingly valuable and do believe we have a great future.

There truly is an excitement about pictures and photography today that's beyond anything before us, and it's growing. Every day we upload around 55 million images to Instagram.

Facebook? We add about 350 million new photos a day and as many as 250 billion images since it's inception. In the US we now spend 3.2 hours on social media every day. Most of this time is looking at pictures! We are absorbing visual content like never before.

In some ways it's hard to even comprehend. When I came to the US to study photography almost 20 years ago the discussions in class were about photography's burgeoning acceptance as fine art and if cropping your images in the darkroom was ethically ok.

Today photography is not only accepted but one of the most popular forms of art and cropping?? That discussion is completely dead and only serves as dating my photographic career!

One can argue that all these images we are bombarded with daily are diluting the value of photography, but what if you create something that truly stands out among all these images? What if you create something unique, which resonates with a fast expanding audience and manages to stand out from all the other images out there?

What if you have an image that makes someone pause, think and feel, now that is just amazing!

We then have something that is unbelievably valuable to anyone trying to market a product or serviceâ¦

As our attention span is getting shorter this capability is getting more and more valuable!!

The ones that can produce images that stand out in this screaming match for attention has one bright future as a photographer!

The obvious question is: So how do we create images that stand out?

How do we create something unique?

We all have access to the same cameras and the same software, so its sure not the gear you have.

The only way to be unique is to use these tools in a way differently than the other photographers out there.

We have all heard this before. What I'd like to offer though is a super speed highway to get there. A fast track to finding that uniqueness that reflects your own visual DNA.

To me, the only way to find this uniqueness is to look at oneself. Find what you are drawn to, what visually turns you on and craft images from the depth of yourself.

Sounds corny? Sounds impossible to access?

It's NOT!

And here's how: You find your photographic DNA.

This can be years of self-examination, or spending the infamous 10,000 hours popularized by Malcolm Gladwell.

There's a faster way though and that's to look at the work of other photographers you truly admire.

This is super highway to really understand your own sensibilities and vision to find what innately inspires you.

Pick a hundred images and ask yourself over and over WHY and WHAT about these pictures attract you to them.

Make a list and you will get an understanding of your innate visual language.  These descriptors you have of why you like these100 pictures is the defining descriptors of your own photographic DNAâ¦

In these descriptors you will see what light quality you like, what color palette and subject matter and all the other elements that you are drawn to.

Your uniqueness is in thisâ¦

So next time you take pictures you will have a clear sense of direction. You now know you like a certain type of place with a certain type of light with a certain type person in there, doing a certain type of pose. It's all in there!

I have, together with fotofagskolen in Norway created the below to help get you started in finding these Visual and emotional descriptors.

In doing this exercise you should have should have a great visual awareness of what you like and long for in your images. It's then just to dive in and create.

Don't feel inspired? Just look at your list of words. The things that inspire you should all be right there!

After doing this exercise there's no need to get into a discussion of natural light or 1 light or 5 light approaches. You just use the tools needed to get to the light quality you know resonates with who you areâ¦

So after finding that unique photographic footprint then what's next?

It's getting these unique pictures in front of the Photo editors, Art buyers and Art directors.

Marketing is an art in itself and I will save this for another guest blog.

So to sum this up I'd say: Don't get engaged in the "photography is dead and we can't make any money and people work for free conversation." Create work that's personal and meaningful to you that reflect the visual things you are drawn to and you will find your worth in your pictures. Photo editors and agencies will recognize this and you will be hired to photograph the things you love and have experiences in the wake of taking pictures few other professions will allow.

Like my Venture Capital friend keep telling me: "Erik, you have the best income to lifestyle ratio of anyone I know".

And I'm not saying this to brag, but to inspire.

Happy picture taking!!

Erik

To learn about the camera equipment that I use, you can click right here.

If you want to learn about my process, here’s a link for that.

You can see more of Erik’s work at ErikAlmas.com and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and YouTube.

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