Posts By Brad Moore

http://youtu.be/y0IdbZrMfOg

Live Action Horse Racing Photography with Dave Black
In the latest addition to KelbyTraining.com, Live Action Horse Racing Photography, join Dave Black on location at Tampa Downs and learn how to photograph horse racing from one of the top sports photographers in the world. Dave gets up early to document everything that happens in the course of a day at a working racetrack, while sharing tips and tricks he's learned over a career that spans 30 years. You'll learn about all the gear he uses, how to set up a remote camera, the importance of choosing the background in each of your shots, why you should focus on the small details as much as the wider panorama to help tell the story, and so much more!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNallyRC Concepcion, Ben Willmore, or Matt Kloskowski? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby (these dates will be posted soon!)
July 29 - Colorado Springs, CO
Aug 16 - San Antonio, TX
Aug 21 - Indianapolis, IN
Aug 27 - San Jose, CA

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers with RC Concepcion
June 17 - Ottawa, ON
June 19 - Toronto, ON
June 21 - Calgary, AB
June 26 - New Orleans, LA

Photographic Artistry with Ben Willmore
July 22 – Cleveland, OH

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
July 31 – Virginia Beach, VA
Aug 7 – Charlotte, NC
Aug 9 – Pittsburgh, PA

Lightroom 5 with Matt Kloskowski
Aug 2 – Hartford, CT

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Frank Doorhof’s Live in New Jersey DVD
Frank Doorhof has released a 3-hour DVD filmed during his recent workshop in New Jersey! See his live shoots and see how he creates his images with limited gear, then watch as he takes those images into Lightroom and Photoshop to finish them. You can find out more about it here, purchase this or any of his other videos here (use the discount code UK99 to get 20% off), or find out how you can win a free copy from Frank here!

Photography FUNdamentals – FREE from Moose Peterson
Want a FREE book from Moose Peterson? Check out his just-released Photography FUNdamentals for the iPad! In this book, Moose covers all of the photography basics that you need to learn so well that they become second nature, which will allow you to focus on making great images instead of your camera settings. You can find out more about the book here, check out a video of Moose explaining the book here, and download it from iTunes here!

Photography Q&A by Zack Arias
Based on his incredibly popular Tumblr, Zack Arias has curated the best questions and answers from that blog and turned them into his brand new book, Photography Q&A! In the book, Zack answers readers questions based on his experiences in the photo industry and life in general. Here’s a sampling of topics from the table of contents… Finding Portrait Subjects, Best Piece of Gear Under $100, Cheap eBay Lights, Going To School for Photography, Finding Your Style, Setting Prices, plus plenty of others.

You can pick up your copy right here, or leave a comment for your chance to win a signed copy from Zack!

Winners
Signed Joe McNally Book Set
– RLevesque

Tim Wallace Class Rental
– Tommy Botello

Kelby Training Live Ticket
– Steve

If you’re one of the winners, we’ll be in touch soon! That’s it for today, have a great Thursday!

I want to thank Scott and Brad for sharing the space with so many great photographers. You guys are good people, and it's an honor to be here among such amazing photographers, creatives, and story tellers. Again, much thanks!

I spent the better part of the last 8 years living and working in far western China, running a photography tourism agency. Just last year I returned to the States to continue a career in the commercial photography market.

I mention western China only because where I predominantly photographed was far enough from the hyper-developed east coast that my life resembled nothing of the China you've seen in the news. I was just far enough out â˜in the boonies' that stories, legends, and mysteries were still afforded the chance to exist.

Over the years of photographing the wild places of China, I experienced many truly strange things, eaten some things I'm not too proud of, and collected my fair share of stories. Some experiences stand above others. Some stories remind us to put down the camera and enjoy the ride, enjoy the people.

This is one such story, and it is hands down one of my most favorite experiences from my life in China. I'm delighted to share it with you:


With high hopes, we pulled onto a dusty road, past a police outpost where three Chinese policemen sat bundled in Soviet-Era winter clothing. They huddled close around a small coal stove after enduring what must have been a miserable night in -40 Celsius temperatures. We jokingly waved as we passed them, curious if we'd be called over for inspection. Nothing. They stared at us and didn't budge. They were too cold to stop us - way too cold to care that two foreigners had just driven past their remote outpost - a common occurrence when photographing the Tibetan plateau in winter.

Losang and I had been scouting a photo workshop through the Sichuan mountains when we happened to glance at an old map. Serthar, it read in Tibetan, a generalized name marking a generalized location. Without much debate we both started plotting a route to what we assumed was Seda monastery, hoping to photograph a mystery.

Seda is one of the few places in Tibet that still retains its original mystery. A photographer's dream. Before our visit, I had heard about its size from a friend who had, years before, only seen the monastery from a hill overlooking the valley but was unable to get inside. Most people either knew little of Seda or nothing at all. The monastery, though 40,000 residents strong, remained a quiet mystery⦠barely more than a rumor and rarely photographed.

We took the last turn up the winding valley road, and there it was, almost too much to take in. The monastery literally covered three mountainsides - a hidden city, seldom spoken of, in the middle of the Tibetan Plateau.

We arrived at the top of the dusty road completely encompassed in a cloud of smoke, remnants of the coal Seda's residents burned in a futile attempt to keep warm through the brutal Tibetan nights. The cloud, thick and yellow, allowed only fleeting bursts of early morning light to reach the valley floor, intensifying the surreal mood of our surroundings. We watched as dark figures in maroon robes darted in and out of the smoke - monks rushing off to morning prayers.

Soon a vast mountain city materialized before us, as morning sun burned away its smoky veil. Losang and I had photographed hundreds of monasteries and developed a natural rhythm to exploring such places, but the enormous city that stood before us demanded pause. We stood silently, not knowing where to start.

Suddenly, a voice came out of nowhere and said in near-perfect English, "Hello! Can I help you two?" The voice, out of place in both time and location, seemed to complete our shock – as if the monastery itself had spoken out loud.

My brain went into overdrive. I was sure I was hearing things.

I looked at Losang as he looked at me – both searching the other's face for signs that either of us was the owner of the voice we'd just heard.  We both knew that in western China, a local speaking perfect English was unheard of.

We slowly turned around to find a monk in his early 20's standing before us, smiling from ear to ear in his red robes, deriving great pleasure from our stunned expressions. He knew he was out of place - an apparition in the holy city.

"My name is Dondrup. I'm guessing by your blank stares that this is your first time to Seda? How about you two come to my house for lunch and tea?"

We spent a long while chatting with Dondrup, testing the limits of his English - testing his sheer existence. Eventually he led us up the long, nearly vertical path to his home. There we sat in his dark, cold house, drinking yak butter tea and sharing lunch like we were long lost friends – completely forgetting that we were there to scout future photo workshops. I specifically remember thinking, "Don't miss this experience. Don't miss this story!" That meant putting the camera away for a while. It's always about the people.

He told us the story of his childhood, how his family had left Tibet when he was very young, how he'd spent the better part of two decades hopping from country to country. He'd only recently returned to Tibet, coming to Seda to attend school and experience his home culture and language for the very first time. He was as much of a foreigner at Seda as we were, as surreal as Seda itself.

We left the city later that day to make the three-day Land Rover drive back to relative civilization. From time to time since that visit, I pick up the phone to hear Dondrup's voice, "Hey Brian! How are you doing man? I hope your family is having a great Christmas!" or "Hey, it's New Years in America right now, isn't it?" After each encounter, I call my friend Losang. and he always reports a recent call from Dondrup as well. More than once Losang and I have asked each other if what we experienced at Seda was real.

The pictures I brought home serve as visual proof, but they can't tell the whole story. To know Seda is to stand in the valley as the clouds part and the morning sun reveals the hillside city. To look into the eyes of its people. To hear their stories and find a friend. The people and places I see through the lens have incredible stories to share. But what I often fail to admit is that the stories need to extend beyond the image, that they'll tell themselves if I listen.

Sometimes we have to put down the camera, connect with people, and enjoy the the story as it unfolds.

In the short time we had at Seda, I was able climb to the top walls of Seda and capture this panorama. It's a huge place and the image doesn't do it justice considering the distance between the mountainsides and the compressed nature of a panoramic shot. Nonetheless, it's a good representation of the enormity of the monastery.


Click here to view the full-size image

You can see more of Brian’s work at BrianHirschy.com, check out his photo tours at PlateauPhotoTours.com, and follow him on Twitter.

http://youtu.be/2yu59jYEk-w

Introducing Beginners Start Here on KelbyTraining.com
Join Scott Kelby tonight, June 6 at 7:00pm ET for a live webcast where he will introduce the latest initiative from KelbyTraining.com, Beginners Start Here. This is a program for beginners that starts them off with classes to learn the basics of their camera, then help them master their photographic interests!

Register for this free webcast right here and you’ll be entered for the chance to win a Sony A58 DSLR! Plus, on the day of the webcast, you’ll be able to get free 3-day rentals of the Canon, Nikon, and Sony DSLR Basics classes and take advantage of discounted subscriptions!

St. Lucia Photo Workshops with Joe McNally, RC Concepcion, and David Burnett
Joe McNally is headed back to the beautiful Anse Chastanet and Jade Mountain in St. Lucia this August, and this time he's taking RC Concepcion and David Burnett with him!

August 18-23, Joe will be joined by world-renowned photojournalist David Burnett as they teach you how to tell stories with your camera. You'll learn everything from using available and artificial light, to street photography, to portraiture, and even get to hear Joe and David share stories from their long careers shooting for publications like National Geographic and LIFE Magazine.

Then from August 25-30, Joe will be joined by RC Concepcion, known for his technical prowess behind both the camera and computer. During this week, you'll learn about portrait lighting, how to tame harsh available light, post processing, shooting and processing for HDR, business strategies, and building a website.

You can sign up for one or both of these workshops and get more info right here. And leave a comment for your chance to win a signed book set from Joe McNally!

Learn Automotive Photography In A Flash with Tim Wallace
Tim Wallace is back with his latest class for KelbyTraining.com, Learn Automotive Photography In A Flash! In this class, Tim keeps things simple and will show you the possibilities of automotive photography using just one camera, one lens, and one light. Tim starts off with the importance of choosing a great location, then covers the gear he’ll use for the shoot. Once he shows you how to set up your camera, he goes through lighting the interior and exterior of the car, as well as the location. From there, he shows how to put all of the shots together in Photoshop using layers and masks to create a beautiful finished image!

Check it out at KelbyTraining.com, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby or RC Concepcion? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby (these dates will be posted soon!)
July 29 – Colorado Springs, CO
Aug 16 – San Antonio, TX
Aug 21 – Indianapolis, IN
Aug 27 – San Jose, CA

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers with RC Concepcion
June 12 - Nashville, TN
June 17 - Ottawa, ON
June 19 - Toronto, ON
June 21 - Calgary, AB
June 26 - New Orleans, LA

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Winners
Cliff Mautner Class Rental
– R Frazier

Kelby Training Live Ticket
– Todd

If you’re one of the winners, we’ll be in touch soon! Have a great Thursday, and we’ll see you tonight at 7pm ET for the live webcast with Scott and friends!


Photo by Jana Mobley

Very honored to be able to have this platform today. Great thanks to Scott and Brad for giving me the opportunity.

It was about 6 years ago that one of my good friend's dad loaned me his Nikon 35mm film camera. I had decided that I was going to major in Studio Art at The University of Alabama. One of the required classes for that specific major was a black and white darkroom photography. I can remember like it was yesterday; learning to expose film properly, develop it with chemicals, and then print in the darkroom. This had not been my original plan. Not at all.

When I was 15 my step father gave me a video camera for Christmas. That camera really changed the way I saw things. I was always making videos of friends and family. It might have been that I was trying to recreate a scene in a movie or I was just filming my friends doing highschool type of stuff. Nonetheless, I really became attached to the motion camera. Because of my interest in motion and cameras I started watching as many movies as I could and studying the camera moves, the composition, the blocking, the lighting, colors, etc. At a friend's recommendation, I watched the film, "American Beauty" directed by Sam Mendes and DP'd by Conrad Hall.

That movie had one of the greatest impacts on me as far as drama and lighting go. It really opened me up to what the possibilities of filmmaking could really be. From that point on, I decided that I wanted to be a feature film cinematographer. So I of course started to apply to all the great schools of cinematography. I was pretty naive at the time. I was an 18 year old kid from Alabama who barely passed high school. Who was I kidding thinking that I was going to get into USC. But I gave it a shot anyway.

Well, a few months later I opened the mail and to my disappointment I could not get into any of the schools that I thought would be the best for my "career."

So I ended up going to the school in my hometown’s backyard, The University of Alabama. Unfortunately, there was no cinematography or film program being offered at the time at UofA. That's where we come back to my story about borrowing the 35mm Nikon. Because I could not study cinematography, I decided the next best thing would be photography. So once again I gave it a shot.

I soon fell in love with photography so much that I decided I should make it my career path. One of my teachers shared with me a book by photographer, Richard Avedon, called In the American West. It was a book of portraits that Avedon took over a period of several years every summer out west. He traveled with his assistants by car through the west and photographed complete strangers that piqued his interest. After seeing Avedon's book it really changed everything for me as far as photography goes.

His portraits had this drama, authenticity, and power to them that really tugged at my heart. They moved me in a way that nothing else did at the time. That's when I realized how powerful a single photograph could be.  Before that I had no objective with my camera. I was a young 20 year old kid shooting everything from flowers, to buildings, to railroad tracks. I was just a guy with a camera that did not have a voice or vision. But after seeing Avedon's book I became literally obsessed with portraiture.

At this point I had no idea how to exactly make a career out of photography, but it didn't bother me.  All I wanted to do was photograph the people that I would encounter. I started driving hours outside of my hometown to rural southern towns. I would walk up to complete strangers and ask to take their portrait. At first it was scary asking someone you didn’t know if you could make their portrait. Most people did not understand, but usually always said yes. I ended up shooting lots of people and making a true foundation for my portfolio. I was never being paid to create any of this work. I really had a true sense of commitment and passion to be constantly making portraits.

After a few years, I started to think about how I was going to turn this into a career. I started showing the work that I had created to magazines and advertising agencies around Alabama. I did a lot of studying and reading on the internet about what kind of people actually hire photographers. Before I knew it, people started hiring me for jobs. It was nothing too glamorous, but I was having the time of my life actually getting paid every once in a while to take pictures of people. It was almost like I was so naive at the beginning of my career, not knowing exactly what to do and showing work after I had only been shooting for a couple of years that it worked in my favor.

Fast forward 4 years later, and a lot has happened. I got married, tooks lots of pictures, showed lots of pictures, hustled all over the south trying to meet people, got an agent, hustled more, took more pictures, got a few breaks in Alabama shooting some big ad campaigns, left it all and moved to New York, started over again, hustled even more, took even more more pictures, and now I've been living in New York for two and a half years still shooting.

Through all these years I've learned a few things that I thought I would share today that have helped me in the photography industry.Hopefully not to disappoint, but there are no lighting tips involved, nothing about lenses and cameras, or the latest gear.

1.) Persistence/Hustle
This is probably one of my greatest strengths. It has helped me build the career that I've had so far and has led to a lot of amazing opportunities. Without persistence I don't think I would be a photographer right now. When it comes to getting hired in photography a lot of this business is about relationships + talent. You have to have talent, but you also have to be good at getting to know the right people. I've always been very persistent in going after new clients. I have lists pinned to my wall near my computer that have my "dream" clients listed. I'm always looking at that list reminding myself of who to stay in touch with and who to be showing new work to. There are some people on that list that have never responded to one of my efforts, but I don't stop trying. However, it is important to find a personal balance of being persistent without being too pushy or annoying. I've made a lot of work that was never seen or never appreciated, but I've continued to constantly produce new work and refine my skills.

2.) Focus/Vision
Knowing what I want to make photographs of is really important to me. I've always felt an attraction to making pictures of people. That's what I've focused on ever since I fell in love with portraiture. I really try to hone my craft by always making portraits and pushing myself technically and creatively. There are sometimes where I feel that I get into a rut from a creative standpoint. I sometimes go into my default way of photographing, which basically means that I resort to what feels comfortable. That can be a trap. It's always good to get out of your comfort zone and try something new – usually that's when your best work is created. I decided a couple of years ago that I wanted to be known for something in photography. In a sense, I wanted to become a master at something. I'm not implying that I'm in any way shape or form a "true master" at photography, I just simply strive to be one. My focus is making portraits and always trying to improve the way I work. I would much rather be great at one thing in photography, than be mediocre at a few.

3.) Show your work
Life's too short to not give a go at something you love. Once photography became my passion, I have never stopped trying to make it my sole career. I would go to meet potential clients while I was still in college. I hardly knew anything about photography, but I knew that I wanted to make a living from it because of how much I loved it. Most people I hear from are always waiting to show their work when they think it's perfect. That was not the case for me. I started early – I got out there and showed it to anyone that would give me the time – I still do. Anytime I'm traveling on assignment, I might stay in a city for another day or so and make meetings with agencies and magazines. Once I had built a successful career in Alabama, I left it all to start all over in New York. I knew what kind of photography I wanted to do and I knew that I needed to be in a place like New York to make it happen. From the moment I moved to the city I hit the subways and went all over the city lugging my portfolio. I still make an effort every few months to make more rounds of meetings. The point is that you can't wait, you just have to get out there and show your work.

These three points have really been a foundation for the success of my career thus far. Without them I really don't think I would be anywhere. As you know, there is obviously more to my work than these three principles. I think to be successful in the photography industry you have to find a way to stand out. Which is much easier said than done. I still don't feel like I'm there yet, but I'm really enjoying the process of finding that path. Hope you enjoyed the post and maybe you can take something away from it.

You can see more of Miller’s work at MillerMobley.com, and follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

http://youtu.be/2yu59jYEk-w

Introducing Beginners Start Here on KelbyTraining.com
Join Scott Kelby next Thursday, June 6 at 7:00pm ET for a live webcast where he will introduce the latest initiative from KelbyTraining.com, Beginners Start Here. This is a program for beginners that starts them off with classes to learn the basics of their camera, then help them master their photographic interests!

Register for this free webcast right here and you’ll be entered for the chance to win a Sony A58 DSLR! Plus, on the day of the webcast, you’ll be able to get free 3-day rentals of the Canon, Nikon, and Sony DSLR Basics classes and take advantage of discounted subscriptions!

Capturing The Moments People Share with Cliff Mautner
Cliff Mautner is not only one of the Top 10 Wedding Photographers in the World, he’s also considered one of the most inspirational instructors as well! In the latest Art of Photography class on KelbyTraining.com, Capturing The Moments People Share, Cliff sits down with Mia McCormick to discuss his approach to creating inspiring photographs that, well, capture the moments people share! Over the course of an hour, Cliff talks about getting started, finding beautiful light, capturing emotion, and staying out of the rut.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Scott Kelby in Toronto This Weekend!
This Sunday, June 2, Scott Kelby will be the keynote speaker at Exposure Show presented by Henry’s Camera in Toronto, Ontario! Don’t just go on Sunday though… Make sure you also check out Dave Cross, Dixie Dixon, James Schmelzer, and all the other presenters the entire weekend, Friday through Sunday!

The best part? As far as I can tell, tickets are FREE when you sign up for the Henry’s newsletter! Or, if you just really don’t want to sign up, tickets are still only $20. Not a bad deal if you ask me.

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with RC Concepcion? Check out these seminar tours!

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers with RC Concepcion
June 12 - Nashville, TN
June 17 - Ottawa, ON
June 19 - Toronto, ON
June 21 - Calgary, AB
June 26 - New Orleans, LA

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Winners
The Digital Photography Book Part 1 – Second Edition
– KC
– David Gould
– Andrew Petti
– Gordon
– Katie

Kelby Training Live Ticket
– Kevin Bays

Hollywood Film Tools for Photographers Rental
– Cody Ash

That’s it for today. If you’re one of the winners, we’ll be in touch soon!

Many people ask me how I manage my social media accounts (and others make stuff up rather than figure out what I do). Here are the gory, inside-story details of what I do. Perhaps you may find some of my methods useful to help you get the most out of social media, too.


TWITTER
On Twitter, I’m @GuyKawasakiMy Twitter practices defy the recommendations of social media “schmexperts” (schmuck + experts) to manually post a limited number of tweets and not use automation, repetition, contributors, and ghostwriters.

I have never been on the Twitter Suggested User List, and I have more than 1.2 million followers. I attribute this success to providing a lot of interesting links that people retweet. These retweets expose me to many people who then follow me. There are five (yes, five — count ’em) sources that feed my Twitter account:

1) HolyKaw
I co-founded a website called Alltop. Half of it is an aggregation of 30,000 RSS feeds organized into 1,500 topics ranging from adoption to zoology. The other half is a website called HolyKaw. HolyKaw provides a continuous flow of interesting and diverse stories that should elicit the response, "Holy cow!" (Holycow.com was taken but since my name is pronounced "Cow-asaki," I figured that HolyKaw would work.)

The posts on HolyKaw are short summations of stories, a picture or video to illustrate the story, and a link to the source. Approximately twenty people/organizations have contributor-level access to HolyKaw.

We pay several as editors — they are not "interns" in the sense of unpaid students. Organizations such as Futurity and National Geographic also have contributor-level access because they consistently post great stories.

The headline of a HolyKaw post — for example, "Compilation of stories about introverts, outsiders, and loners" — automatically generates tweets that go out through a custom app called GRATE, for "Guy's Repeating Automated Tweet Engine.” These slightly modified tweets appear four times, eight hours apart.

The reason for repeated tweets is to maximize traffic and therefore advertising sales. I've found that each tweet gets approximately the same amount of clickthroughs. Why get 600 page views when you can get 2,400? Like CNN, ESPN, and NPR, we provide content repeatedly because people live in different time zones and have different social media habits.

2) Repurposed Google+ Posts
Three other people also post to HolyKaw via Google+: Peg FitzpatrickTrey Ratcliff, and me. (I explain this in the Google+ section below.)

3) Repurposed Facebook.com Posts
Peg Fitzpatrick manages the Facebook.com/guysco brand page. When she posts stories there, they automatically appear as tweets.

4) My Comments and Responses
I use Tweetdeck to respond to @-mentions of @Guykawasaki, as well as to direct messages. If you see a response tweet, it is always me — never anyone else.

5) Promotional Tweets
Finally, if you see a tweet that is promoting my books, appearances, or investments, it's almost always one that I posted with Tweetdeck or that Peg Fitzpatrick has scheduled using HootSuite.


GOOGLE+
On Google+, I’m GuyKawasakiand Google+ is the core of my social media existence. It is the Macintosh of social media: better, used by fewer people, and often condemned by the experts. Unlike other social media profiles I own, no one else ever posts, responds, or comments on Google+ as me.

My orientation toward Google+ (and social media in general) is what I call the NPR Model. My role is to curate good stories that entertain, enlighten, and inspire people 365 days a year. My goal is to earn the right to promote my books, companies, or causes to them just as NPR earns the right to run fundraising telethons from time to time.

My posts range from first-person accounts of being a black tourist in Chinawhat happened to Allen Iverson after his NBA career, and gifts from Air New Zealand. I use five primary resources to find stories to post:

1) My Alltop Account
This is a custom compilation of the RSS feeds of websites such as In Focus, The Big Picture, YouTube, and NPR that are mother lodes of great content. This is my one-stop shopping cart for content.

2) HolyKaw
Yes, I post what my contributors post as me (i.e. under my name) because the HolyKaw contributors are often better at being me than me. Wrap your mind around that.

3) What's Hot Feed of Google+
Think of this as crowdsourced story leads. The beauty of this feed is that you know that people have already judged the stories as good, though it tends to be heavy on Android news and inspirational quotations.

4) Most Popular Stories
When I'm checking out stories from the first two sources, I look at the "Most Emailed" and "Most Popular" listings on the right side of most websites. These often yield great material. I've also compiled a collection of most emailed and most popular feeds at Most-Popular.alltop to make this even easier for you.

5) Pointers From Various Friends and Family
Many people know that I'm on the hunt for good content, so they send me leads. These are almost always good enough to post.

Some of my Google+ posts pass the "holy cow!" test, and there is a plug-in to publish Google+ posts to a WordPress blog. This means I can cherry pick my Google+ posts for HolyKaw. (Look for the hashtag "HolyKaw" to see which will appear in HolyKaw and later Twitter.)

Peg Fitzpatrick, Trey Ratcliff, and I use this method to select some of their Google+ posts for inclusion in HolyKaw. They do this to gain additional exposure since these posts are tweeted to my 1.2 million Twitter followers four times eight hours apart through the HolyKaw GRATE machine.

Three Google+ Power Tips
I adore Google+, so let me provide these power tips for using the service:

1) Find anytime, but post when you're cogent.
I often get up in the middle of the night and check Alltop and the Google+ What's Hot feed on my Nexus 7. When I find something good, I share it to a Google+ private community with only one member: me. When I wake up in the morning, I go to this community to see what stories I found in a less cogent condition and write up a post.

2) Schedule Google+ posts.
There are multiple ways to schedule Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Pinterest posts using various tools. However, Google+ makes it harder than those services. There are two ways to do this, however. First, there's Do Share, a Chrome extension. Second, if you have a HootSuite enterprise account, you can schedule to a Google+ Business Page (as opposed to a personal profile). Since my Google+ focus is on my personal profile, I don’t use the HootSuite method.

3) Get rid of trolls.
Be a hard-ass: Get rid of people who irritate you. Think of your Google+ posts as your swimming pool. If people pee in it, throw them out. There are some people you need to get out of your social media life. A Chrome extension called Nuke Comments is a lovely solution because it enables you to delete a comment, block the person, and report him/her with one click.


FACEBOOK
I have two personas on Facebook: Facebook.com/guy and Facebook.com/guysco. The first is a personal profile, and the second is a brand page. I operate them differently.

First, a virtual assistant monitors my Google+ account and manually adds most of my Google+ posts to Facebook.com/guy using Buffer. (Disclosure: I advise Buffer.)

There are plugins that can automatically publish Google+ posts to Facebook. However, every Google+ post is not appropriate for Facebook, and there's no way for me to tag the ones that are appropriate. Thus, a human has to make the decision, download the photo or YouTube embed link, make minor edits such as removing the "+" in Google+ +mentions, and post to Facebook.

I monitor comments at Facebook.com/guy and respond to them as much as time permits. My virtual assistant never acts as me, so either I answer or there is no response at all.

Second, for Facebook.com/guysco, Peg Fitzpatrick, whom I mentioned earlier, makes all the posts to this page, and these stories automatically become tweets. This Facebook Page is a branding effort for "Guy's companies," which are primarily my books.


LINKEDIN
On LinkedIn, I am Guy Kawasaki. The virtual assistant who takes my Google+ posts and publishes them to Facebook uses the same process for LinkedIn using Buffer. One of the cool things about Buffer is that you can post to Facebook and LinkedIn at the same time, so this is easy.

There are seldom comments on my LinkedIn posts, so I seldom visit my posts to respond — of course, this may be a self-fulfilling process. But I have to draw the line somewhere, or I'll never play hockey during the day, which is a key component of my happiness.


PINTEREST
On Pinterest, I’m GuyKawasaki, but Peg Fitzpatrick manages my Pinterest presence. There are two reasons: First, I don't have enough time to do a good job with more than three services (my priority, in order, is Google+, then Twitter, then Facebook).

Second, I don't have Peg's magic sauce to manage Pinterest as well as the Pinterest community deserves. Part of doing social media well is knowing what you don't know and what you can't do well, and then finding someone who does.


CONCLUSION
Don't get the impression that there is a huge team of people doing what I described above. The total of all resources, excluding my own activities, is approximately one full-time equivalent. In addition, I spend three to four hours per day creating my own posts and commenting and responding.

To summarize, here's quick wrap-up to review my social media methods:

Twitter: Mostly generated from the headlines of HolyKaw stories, four times, eight hours apart; contributions via Google+ and Facebook; and manual promotional tweets.

Google+: Me only. Think of me as the Mike Rowe of Google+ — I’m willing to do the “dirty jobs.”

Pinterest: Peg Fitzpatrick acting as me.

Facebook and LinkedIn: Virtual assistant reposting some of my Google+ posts.

Again, no one responds as me (for better or worse, as I’ve sometimes learned) on social media, though many different people may be behind a post.

This is how I manage my social media presence as of May 2013. I hope there are techniques here that you can use. Stay tuned, because my procedures are ever-changing.

Guy Kawasaki is a special advisor to the Motorola business unit of Google. He is also the author of APE, What the Plus!, Enchantment, and nine other books. HubSpot invited Guy to reveal the secrets behind his incredibly active and popular social media profiles that enable him to reach millions each day. You can find out more about him at GuyKawasaki.com or click any of the links above to follow him on social media.

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