Posts By RC Concepcion

Hey guys, RC jumping in the line over here to just share out a couple of things that came across my Google plus feed.

Amazing Nikon D4 Video

WHY – Nikon D4 Release Video from Corey Rich on Vimeo.

I know many of you are interested in the Nikon D4 as much as we all are over here. That said, the biggest question that i’ve had on the brain is just how good will the video footage be coming out of the camera? Thankfully I didn’t have to plunk down the 6K in order to find out. Corey Rich has made a phenomenal video not only highlighting the features of the D4 from a video POV, but showcasing three amazing people in sports. I dont know about you guys, but the saving of the pennies has been on for me to land one of the pro level Nikon cameras for video. This one just makes me want to chomp at the bit even more!

Upcoming Notable – The Fuji X-Pro1 (RC’s Impressions)

This has interesting written all over it. The X100 definitely put Fuji on the radar in terms of Rangefinder type cameras with impressive optics, and while I may not have warmed up to it in the end, it cannot be denied that it certainly made a splash. One of the things that I couldn’t get out of my head was “a Fixed lens? Really? We havent heard that last of this one.. there’s GOT to be more to it.”

Well, say hello to other shoe dropping. It appears that Fuji will be dropping the new X-Pro1 cameera pretty soon (some say today!). Checking the Photorumors website, the X-Pro1 looks like an X100 on Steroids, giving you a 16MP APS-C sensor in a small rangefinder body – complete with interchangeable lenses. It’s also rumored that Fuji will be making an M-mount to fit Leica lenses onto this. Interesting indeed! Click on the link below to get more inffo on this:

Photorumors – All Details about the X-Pro1

Changing Metadata Copyright Information for 2012

With it being the new year and all, it goes without saying we need to start changing our copyright data in our Lightroom and Photoshop installs. I figured id make the requisite reminder video to make sure you guys had those changes all taken care of!

Wanted to thank Scott for letting me pitch in here! Should you want to follow more of what i’m doing, please feel free to visit me on my website at or circle me over at Google Plus

RC –
RC on Google Plus!

Hey everyone, RC here  back for another Pimpy Thursday! Enjoy!

(update:  By popular demand, I went in and gave you the gist of it, in linkable text form. :) – RC )

Worldwide Photo Walk

The Worldwide Photo Walk has over 500 cities signed up already.  If you want to make sure you take part in this great event in october – Make sure you register for the walk!

Kelby Training App Update

As mentioned a couple of days ago, if you haven’t updated your Kelby Training App – make sure that you download the new version of the app.  With some server changes, and some new features.. this is going to be important for you to get!

Extending the Photoshop World Early Bird discount
The Photoshop World Early Bird discount has been extended!!  Here’s the link with details and/or to sign-up. Jump on it today! If you want to snag a room at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino, the same hotel all the instructors stay at , at the special Photoshop World rate of $129, there are only a few rooms left in our block, so go to the Photoshop World travel page and grab your room now. They’re also offering $149 at “The Hotel” at Mandalay Bay (a trendy boutique hotel attached to the Mandalay Bay). See you in Vegas!

Two New Courses  for the iPad and iPhone!
My new App that teaches you how to shoot and process HDR like a pro just hit the App store and right now it’s only $9.95 (sweet!). Here’s the link (or get it from the App store on your IOS device).

Corey Barker also has an app called the Photoshop CS5 3D Crash Course.  If you’ve ever been interested in exploring the world of 3D in Photoshop, Corey Barker is just the guy to take you through it.  Here’s the link!

Matts New Compositing Book

We’re excited that Matt Kloskowski’s book on compositing is here!  The Photoshop Compositing Secrets book is out, and if  judged by the promo video, this is going to be a smash!  Make sure you check it out by clicking on this link

Check out the Kelby Training Tour Dates!

Dave Cross and Scott Kelby have some great tours going out there..  make sure you check them out at the Kelby Training Live page

Scott Kelby’s Light Shoot It, Retouch it Book Available for preorder

Im totally excited about this one.  If you’re into checking out just how to light, shoot, retouch amazing images – you are going to LOVE Scott’s new book!  Make sure you check it out on the Amazon Website!

Ben Wilmore in Africa

Ben’s teaching a workshop in Africa – and it should be an awesome time.  Make sure you check out the tour details over at Ben’s site – Digital Mastery

Rob Sylvan – Lightroomers

Our buddy Rob Sylvan has some great tours and resources on his website.  Make sure you go to Lightroomers to check it all out!

Hey everyone!  RC here doing a quick blog post on this Friday to see if I can convince some of you to do something I just recently did.  Go Fishing with your camera!

I was inspired to do this after watching “Another Day With Jay Maisel” over on the Kelby Training website.  I’ve been an admirer of Jay’s work for a while, and as a friend I try to visit with him when he’s available in New York City.  Every time that I do, I’m always nervous as to whether he’ll ask if I have been carrying my camera around everywhere I went.

I’ve always seen my relationship with Photography as a “I will decide to do it at key points” – and to that i’ve always been quick to leave my camera at home.  Because of that, I am always the guy who runs into a scenario when I see a great shot, i’m never able to get it.  To counter that – i’ve made myself a little bit more disciplined in carrying a camera.  While it’s not all the time, it’s certainly a lot more than it used to be.

I was traveling into New York City to give an interview over at School of Visual Arts with Katrin Eismann.  I figured, while I was there, I would take advantage of the time and try to make some images.  After watching Jay’s event – I became tempted to do one thing:

The Challenge

Take my camera – nothing else – and wait for a moment to come to me.  While i’ve heard this concept before – Find your stage – the actors will come to it – I’ve never really been confident enough to actually give it a shot.

I took to the streets of Manhattan, and just walked around until I found a place that I thought was interesting – a colored wall.   Standing across the street, I aimed my lens to this newly found stage.  Rather than run around and try to find the killer image that I would put into X – I took a deep breath and said to myself “Lets wait here to see what kind of moments come to me.” I also gave myself a limit. I wouldnt go out to find a great place in the city. I could only choose the location of the scene between where i had lunch, and Penn Station – where I was boarding the train back to Long Island.

Anyone who knows me, knows that I cant stand being in hot weather.  Anxious as I was – I noticed that the feeling of frustration that I had was replaced by anticipation. Excitement.  It almost felt like a fisherman – setting up a spot and casting into the water, and wondering what kind of story you will be able to tell your friends at the close of the day.  Some of the shots that I got from the day are in the collage that I have above.

Watching The Stage

I noticed that as I started working on getting these shots, I became more focused on the types of color relationships that were coming down the street.  Blues on Greens, Reds and whites on Blues.. things like that.  I also started looking at things like negative space – and how biased I was for one direction versus another.  I changed its usage and saw images that I thought were cool become that much better for me.  I started looking at how people could affect these relationships, and I nervously sat around waiting for magic moments to occur.

For example – I had my camera trained to the picture of the windows of this post for a long time.  That picture on it’s own doesnt really do a great deal.  However, I stayed fixed to that spot for two reasons:

If a person wouldve shown up in this general area, I would have been incredibly happy.

If a person wouldve shown up in THIS spot and looked down to that center window I would’ve been overjoyed!

Unfortunately for me – neither of those things happened.  As much as I wanted to make these moments happen – luck just wasn’t on my side.  There were no fish to catch today.

Packing it Up

I got to Penn Station  with a mixture of disappointment and intrigue.  I sooo hoped to have that Henri Cartier-Bresson moment of the man jumping the puddle but all I got back was a bunch of OK pictures, and a lot of sweat.

Then I sat and thought it a bit more:

I sat at these places and wondered about color and the relationship between the subject and enviroment.  I played around with space, lines and composition in a quick paced enviroment.  I exercised my technique by moving focus points around, and tried to relearn hitting my automatic “Center Focus” button.

I spent time looking at scenes and wondering what kinds of things would make them more interesting. In effect – I was pre-visualizing my scenarios and making calculations on this.  It was as if I had gone to the photographic gym and went through a workout on my technique.  Yes – for me I looked like a chubby guy doing a half a pushup – but it was MY half a pushup.  I went out with a goal to try something, and in the process was inspired to get a bunch of other lessons.

I was also reminded of one thing we often forget as photographers. Try as we may – luck is still a portion of being in the image.  The more practice we have, the luckier we can get, this is true.  But sometimes luck just doesn’t hit.

Or maybe not in the way you originally intended it.   Happy Friday everyone!

Hey everyone! RC here.  I wanted to give you guys a quick update on the launch of Scott’s new portfolio section and answer a couple of questions while I had a moment.

Before I do, I did want to share with you guys a heartfelt thank you for all of the suggestions and comments that we had on the port launch.  One of the things that makes us very proud and grateful is having such engaging and enthusiastic readers here on the blog.  I know that Scott appreciates all of your comments – and takes his time in going over every one of them.  You guys really look out for this place – and it totally shows.

I figured this would be a cool time to share with you guys some of the changes that we’ve made to the port, some of the changes we’re looking into, and answer some of your questions/feedback.

Things we’ve changed so far

We’ve made it so that the portfolio stretches to 100% of your screen:

Those of you who are looking at the website with a large monitor should see more of the images going from edge to edge.   I think it really does add to the viewing experience.

Kept the logo and navigation constant on the page:

When you are using the scrollbar to move across to the right of the page, you should still see the logo and navigation on the top of the page.  This will work on desktop computers.  The iPad’s being a little fussy with things, so as I get a better way to keep that navigation handy, i’ll implement that in there too.

Landscape Has a Title:

This was one of those moments where I said “ugh.. I should’ve picked that one up”.  It’s funny, cause the Title tag on HTML is usually one of those afterthoughts when i’m working in a page.  Jokingly, I always said to myself (and others) “its one of those things that’s important.. but really gets no attention.”  Later on in the afternoon yesterday I tweeted “Ever wonder how important the Title tag is on a page?  Forget about writing one.. you’ll see. :) ”

Centering the Page

This was a straightforward fix.. and does look good on the site. :)

Things We’re Looking Into

Next and Previous Items using Javascript:

Adding some function that allows you to hit an arrow for next and previous is a very quick way to get some functionality into the page.  The problem here is that the genesis for the change was to create something that had a very specific feel and look on the iPad side.  Changes that you make in Javascript (or more recently- JQuery) can be easy to implement on the desktop side, but may not translate well over to the iPad side of things.  It’s bad enough to have to crosscheck Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and IE on both the PC and Mac side – now we’re adding iPad to the mix.  As I get something that I think will work on this side, i’ll be sure to post it up.

The other thing to keep in mind here is the full screen experience.  If we wanted to only see one picture on the page and wait for the next one, it would mean that the “window” that we see the image in would have to be a specific size.  Let’s say we choose 600 pixels for a landscape. What happens when the next image is a pano? Or, what if the next image is a portrait – well short of the 600 pixels in width for that window.  This would mean that the user would be put in a position to see a picture, click next, see a picture, click next, and so forth. This was a behavior that we had in both the Jquery based portfolio we had earlier (for the ipad) as well as the Flash implementation we worked on.  In the end – the client (in this case, Scott) wanted a smoother experience for the images – which is why we’re leaning in this direction.

Going Back to the Beginning

Im playing around with getting a button at the end of the slideshow to bring the user back to the beginning of the series.  Again, making this for the desktop is pretty easy – JQuery has some built in functonality to animate some slides (or can be added with getting some functionality like jQuery.ScrollTo) but this is something that has limited success on the iPad.  Because of the direction we’re trying to go with this here, it’s something that I’d put on the “lets see how we can make it better”


Why wasnt this portfolio done in WordPress?

One of the things Scott wanted to be able to do here is have a barebones, easy to use way to show off his images that worked well on the desktop and lended itself well to showcasing images on his iPad.  While its totally possible that we could design a child theme in WordPress or setup a new install of WordPress that would manage the portfolio – it just seemed like it was more than what we needed here.  The portfolio here is really managed through a series of HTML files, and adding something to this is as easy as uploading the image, adding a line of code, and being done with it.  Would a WordPress install be easier?  Hard to say.. you’d still have to upload a file, and still have to add it to the portfolio.  At that point -where- it was being done seemed moot.  This gives him a small, non database dependent, simple way to get the images up.  Yes, it -could- have been done in WordPress – but this option wasn’t bad either.  It becomes preference, then.

Dreamweaver Sites are so 1990’s (or 2002, depending on what comment you read) Via Claude and Lynn:

I don’t really use -when- a technology was used as a barometer for whether it’s going to be useful to work with. I just use the ‘is this going to work for this scenario’ method of implementing it.  There are tons of sites that are still being developed in Dreamweaver – and to date it is a VERY powerful tool for someone who wants to have control of even the smallest components.  That said – the solution here seemed easier to implement on Dreamweaver.  One of the things people may not know is that Scott is actually quite adept in Dreamweaver, so it’s not like he would be in unfamiliar territory.

I like WordPress as a development platform – heck I even wrote a book on it not too long ago.  My own personal site is on it ( and I *gasp* even use a Flash Gallery for it.  It’s a great tool.. but its one of several tools.  While WordPress may be a “dream” to use.. this is just as good.

PS.  Went to your site on an iPad – tried to use the thumbnails.  They didn’t work.  Might want to check that out – figured i’d give my two cents for a change. :)

Could we have built a Flash site, that with a bit of code, switched to a iPad Friendly site?

Sure could have.. in fact that’s what we were doing for a while here!  We had a flash site, with an autodetect that moved people over to a jQuery based website for iOS folk.  We just decided to do something different.  That mode worked very well – and I promote it heavy in my book.

Could we Implement a JS hack to paginate through the Portfolio?

We could – but most of these hacks still use vertical pages as a measure and move downward.  Trying to move them across an iFrame using anchors and/or scroll by X amount functions doesnt play nice on iOS devices.  That’s not to say we -can’t-.  That’s just to say I want to find the best way to do it so we do it for all browsers.

Could we make something that just updates the images from Lightroom?

I’ve been asking for a feature in the Bridge and LR web galleries that just updates the images and not the HTML FOREVER now, and have got no response.  Even if someone made an HTML gallery for images, made some tweaks to the HTML code and published it, it would all get erased during the next export.  One checkbox that said “update image references/ not the index.htm” would be killer.. alas.. nada yet.


One of the things that I thought was great about making the portfolio, and reading through the comments is the amount of considerations that need to be made when working on a website.  As a designer, you need to leverage quite a bit of things before you really need to code.  Audience, technology, interpreted devices, statistics (did you know that 1280×1024 is about 7% of the population.  The next higher resolution? 8%), and on top of that, the wishes of the client.  Factoring in all of that makes for a great “What if we did this.. ” moment because there is always something else to factor into that decision.

Thankfully, it’s what makes doing all of this so much fun.  And i’m ever grateful for that. :)


Hey everyone, RC here. Aside from all of the cool projects we have going on in the world of Photoshop and Photography, we also keep an ear out there on the world of technology. I figured i’d keep things light today and just share with you a couple of things that were awesome (and funny) in the world of tech this week.

Kevin Bacon On Kevin Bacon on Google TV

Google’s off to take the TV world by storm, and despite a few setbacks with channel providers, theyre still making a full court press to win the hearts and minds of the TV faithful. Theyre newest attempt? Kevin Bacon. I’d love to add more color commentary to this, but it’s just priceless on it’s own.

Adobe Releases Flash 10.2 Beta
If you’re into watching video on your computers, this is something that should definitely interest you. Flash 10.2 beta is now taking all of the processing of video and making it less and less computer processor intensive by enabling more hardware acceleration. The results are just awesome.

Click here to go to the Adobe Labs Website and see a video of 1080p on a Macbook air. With no Hiccups.

“No Color Management” Print Utility for Photoshop
Recently, John Nack of Adobe has announced that Adobe has created a utility to give back a feature that was removed in the newest versions of Photoshop – the ability to print with no color management.

According to John Nack:
“…There are, however, people who need to print without color management. They print color targets which are then used to generate printer profiles for new printer/paper/ink combinations. These users range from printer manufactures to third-party ink suppliers to power users like Andrew Rodney who supply their own high quality profiles.”

For more information this, make sure you click on this link to go to his blog.

A little light nerdiness never hurt anyone. Have a wonderful Friday everyone!

Nighttime in New York City

A week or so ago my buddy RC Concepcion stops by my office and he’s showing me some great night photos he took of the New York City skyline (seen here and below). I asked where he shot them from, and he told me some were taken from the top of Rockefeller Center, and some from the top of the Empire State Building.

Since these were night shots, he’d need a tripod to get shots that sharp, but neither of those places allows you to shoot with a tripod. In fact, they pretty much confiscate your tripod if you even walk in the front door with one (of course, they tag it, and give it back when you leave).

So I asked RC how he got permission to shoot with a tripod, and he said he actually didn’t use a tripod at all—then he let me in on a little trick that he’s been using that so far hasn’t raised any eyebrows, but still gives great tripod like results for low light shooting.

He said he: …”uses a Manfrotto 244 Variable Friction Magic Arm with Camera Bracket and a Manfrotto Super Clamp Without Stud. B&H Photo offers them together as a kit, but the arm is different – it has a lever instead of the ball tensioner” (which RC thinks is better).

He told me, “On both the Top of the Rock and The Empire State Building there are protection fences that are pretty sturdy. You can attach the arm to the structure and fire away.” (that’s the rig shown at right—you can see it clamped to the fence, and it gives you a lot of freedom as to where you position the camera).

The shot you see below was done using this same rig, but it was shot from the observatory at the top of the Empire State Building.

Anyway, I had just never thought to use a Magic Arm and Clamp for situations where tripods aren’t allowed (that RC guy is pretty clever). Anyway, my thanks to RC for the photos, and for letting share his cool tip with you guys. :)

Flatiron Building at Dusk.