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  • Posts By Scott Kelby

    I got lucky enough to spend the day shooting and learning from one of the hottest Wedding photographers in the industry today—the amazing David Ziser. David was hired to shoot a huge black-tie wedding in Cincinnati and was kind enough to invite me to come up and spend the day with him so I could see behind the scenes how he shoots a wedding of this scale. It was really an amazing experience—and even though I was technically there just auditing the wedding, I still wound up shooting about 1200 frames (it was a really long day----we shot for five hours before the ceremony even began, and didn't leave until after 2:00 am). The shot above (click on it to see a larger version--then scroll down to the next post for a slideshow from the wedding) was taken about three hours before the wedding,…

    About the images in the slideshow above: the only light source I had for both the wedding and the reception was that one Nikon SB-800 (there are no shots there with just natural light). Most of the time the flash was mounted on the camera (although I did handhold some wireless off camera flash shots) and I used either bounce flash (bouncing off any white ceiling that wasn't too high), or I would turn the flash head completely sideways (aiming directly to my left) just to let a little of the light from the flash spill onto my subject, so that way the shot was mostly the ambient room light with just a little bit of flash on the subject. I dragged the shutter quite a bit (using a slow shutter speed like 1/10 to 1/20 of a sec.) to get more ambient room…

    Hi everybody! Here's what's up: This is amazing: I found this link on PhotoDoto.com, and it's to a short video clip from the TED conference that shows an engineer from Microsoft demoing some new imaging technology developed by a company that Microsoft recently acquired. It's a peek at the near future, and definitely worth checking out (it pretty much blew me away). Click here to watch the clip. My publisher contacted me this week to let me know that the Chinese translation of my book, "The Digital Photography Book" is the #1 bestselling photography book in China (the graphic above is from the Chinese publisher). I have a friend who speaks simplified Chinese, and I asked him to translate the ad, and that's when I found out why it's #1. Apparently they had to slightly change the title of the book for it to…

    Here's a couple of quick things: Corey Barker has just launched an online course called "Adobe Illustrator Down & Dirty Tricks" and if you're into Illustrator--you've got to check this out (Corey is just a wizard at Illustrator, and he's got some amazing techniques). Get the full details (or sign up for the class) at photoshoptraining.com (don't forget: NAPP members get a HUGE discount on these courses).P.S. While you're there, check out Matt's online Lightroom 1.1 course). Mikkel Aaland just released a book that looks really interesting called "Photoshop Lightroom Adventure" which includes case studies from a demanding road test in Iceland (you've probably heard about this Icelandic adventure that Adobe sponsored earlier this year, and this book grew out of that amazing trip). Here's a link to the book (published by O'Reilly Publishing). Remember how I mentioned those cool brush sets from Obsidian…

    If you're a professional photographer, check this out: NAPP is partnering with Hill & Usher to make equipment and professional liability insurance available to qualifying members. Hill & Usher specialize in this type of coverage for photographers, videographers, graphic artists, and other art related interests. Premiums for customized package policies generally start at $500 per year, with flexible monthly or quarterly payment plans offered in most programs. If you're a NAPP member, click here to jump to a special area we've created on the member site with more information.

    Happy Thursday everybody: here's what's up: The fine folks over at Westcott (the people behind the amazing Spiderlites that I use in studio, and on my Lightroom Tour) have featured my Lightroom tour in their customer newsletter (that's it above--click to see a much larger version).The headshot you see in the newsletter was taken for a Photoshop CS3 online course I'm working on, using just one TD-5 Spiderlite and one Westcott 30" reflector. To get that fashion/glamor look I used a "Clamshell" (also called "Over and Under" lighting ) set-up, with the Spiderlite TD-5 (with a large softbox attached) positioned directly in front of the model's face, angled toward her, and positioned as close as I could get it to her face without actually being seen in the frame. Then I positioned the reflector (silver side up) just below her neck (again, just out…

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