Posts By Scott Kelby

We're just five days away, and right now we have more than 23,000 photographers already signed-up for 1,200+ local walks around the world this Saturday, Oct 5th. We are thrilled at the worldwide participation and sense of community this has created, and I can't wait for the local walk I'm leading on Saturday in Rome, Italy to get here (it’s my and my wife’s first time to Rome, and my brother, his girlfriend, and a few more friends will be joining us along the way. I am psyched!).

If you haven't signed up for a Walk Yetâ¦.
It's not too late. Here's the linkâ”find a city near you, and sign up to be a part of your local walk.

Seven Tips for Walkers
Each year, I gave seven tips for walkers to help you make the most of your walk, and I've got those here for you again. If you're going to be walking with us this weekend, take a moment to give these  a quick read: I promise it'll make a difference in your experience.

(1) Drink Plenty of Water
Make sure you take plenty of water with you and stay fully hydrated during the entire walk. Two hours is a long time to be out in the sun so make sure you drink lots of water before and during the walk. (TIP: Want to be a hero? Bring an extra bottle of water or two to share with other walkers).

(2) Use Sunscreen
If your walk is during daylight hours (and most are), make sure you wear plenty of sunscreen, and don't forget to wear a hat for protection as well.

(3) Leave a Small Footprint
Make sure that you have as little physical impact on the area you're walking in as possible. If you're walk is in nature, make sure the area looks exactly the same when you leave as when you got there. Same thing in a downtown areaâ”-we want store owners and pedestrians to welcome events like this, so be kind to everyone you meet, and create as small a footprint on your walk route as possible. Take only pictures. Leave only footprints.

(4) Make New Friends
This is a social event, and everybody is there to have fun and make new friends, so make sure you talk with other walkers in your group. Ask them â˜what kind of stuff like they to shoot,' or â˜how they like their camera or a particular accessory,' or ask â˜if they've ever been on this street or area before,' and you'll have a conversation up and running in no time.

(5) Let Your Leader Lead
Your walk leader has put a lot of time and effort into planning the walk, organizing and publicizing the walk, and making the whole thing happen (after all; without your local Leader there might not be a walk in your city, right?), so don't try and hijack the walk; let your Leader do the talking, and the leading, and that way you can just relax and focus on getting some great shots.

(6) Get To Your Walk Early
It happens every year; some people miss the walk altogether because they couldn't find a parking space, or they missed the train or subway, or they ran into something that delayed them from getting to the start of the walk on time. It's really heartbreaking to get there and find that the walk is already underway and there's nobody standing there but you, so make sure you plan extra time to get to your walk's Starting Location, especially if you're not familiar with the area. You'll save yourself a lot of stress (and possible heartbreak) by getting there early. Plus, if you get there early, there's extra time to make friends before the walk even startsâ”maybe you'll make a "walking buddy" who'll share the experience with you.

(7) Play it Safe
The single most important thing is your safety during the Photo Walk.

Don't get distracted by what you're shooting or seeing, and back right into the street, or into another photographer (or just a person walking down the street). Keep your wits about you, and remember than many of you will be shooting in a downtown area, on crowded sidewalks or busy streets, so just stay alert the entire walk, and look out for other walkers as well. Also, don't wander into any areas or alleys that may look the least bit unsafeâ”stay with your groupâ”there's safety in numbers, and of course always keep a close eye on your camera gear and personal items.

Also, make sure you check out the Official World Wide Photo Walk Facebook Page (here's the link) for more walking tips and also you can follow the official walk on Google+ (here's the link) or on Twitter using the Hashtag #WWPW.

See you guys this weekend as we make photographic history!

Mornin’ everybody. I wanted to wrap up the week with a quick trick for creating realistic backgrounds for compositing, so here goes:

When I was in Seattle for my “Shoot Like a Pro” Tour, before the seminar kicked off in the morning, Brad and I went just outside the convention center so I could create some real shallow depth-of-field backgrounds I could use in Compositing. I did this mostly because I hate how it looks when you take an in-focus background and try and “fake it” by adding a massive Gaussian Blur or Lens Blur filter in Photoshop.

Above: I had Brad stand in the street, and I zoomed-in fairly tight on him with a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, at f/2.8 so the background would be way out of focus (as seen here). Once I was focused on Brad, I would hold the shutter button half-way down to lock the focus on Brad, then I would give Brad a signal and he would walk out of the frame (that’s Brad walking out of the frame above).

Above: Once Brad was fully out of the frame, I’d just press the shutter button the rest of the way down and take the shot. Mission accomplished  — a realistic shallow depth-0f-field background.

Above: Since this technique literally took less than 30-seconds, we shot a handful of different backgrounds, at different angles and on nearby streets, and every time the technique was the same: Brad stands in place: I focus on him at f.2/8; hold the shutter button half-way down; I give him the signal; he walks out of the frame; then “click.” I had 20 or so background in just 10 minutes.

Above: Here’s the image at the top again — it was my first test of the concept. I didn’t crop our subject here as tightly as I had actually shot Brad, so it would be more realistic if I had matched her size relative to the frame, but at least I can see that it worked — now I just have to find the right image for the foreground.

My subject was shot on a light gray background in my studio, and then I used Photoshop’s Quick Select tool along with the Refine Edge feature to remove her from that background and then I copy and pasted her onto the out-of-focus background. Once there, I matched her overall color-tone to the background, and then lastly I put a slight tint over the entire image (to help visually unify the two) and I added a soft glow effect as well (a 50-pixel Gaussian Blur, and then I changed the blend mode to Soft Light and lowered the opacity to 50%).

Anyway, just a quickie for Friday, and maybe something you’ll consider next time you’re out shooting with a friend who can act as an “in-focus” stand-in to create some out-of-focus backgrounds.

Back to Football
This weekend I’m shooting the Bucs vs. Cardinals NFL game with the Buc’s new starting quarterback Mike Glennon. That should keep me busy during the first quarter, eh?  Also, trying some new techniques I picked up from the just-released book, “Peter Read Miller on Sports Photography.”

I’ll share some shots next week, but next week is also Worldwide Photo Walk week (the actual walk is next Saturday, and we have 1.200 walks organized in cities all over the world, with more than 22,000 walkers so far. Hope you’ll join us next Saturday. 

Here’s to a great weekend. Hope it’s a safe and fun one. :)

(1) Fascinating interview with the man who wrote Photoshop, Thomas Knoll
A really great look at Photoshop’s history, evolution and much more. Very frank, revealing, and refreshing. Great stuff  (click the video above to jump over to Vimeo to watch the interview — Vimeo wouldn’t let me embed it here, but you can watch it there).

(2) Adobe’s photographers bundle deal is now available
I know a lot of folks have been waiting for the $9.99 per month bundle deal for the latest versions of both Photoshop & Lightroom (for previous owners of Photoshop, all the way back to CS3), to become available, and now it’s here. Here’s the link for more details. I did a post with more info shortly after Adobe’s announcement during the Photoshop World keynote — here’s that link.

(3) Adobe announces 1-million Creative Cloud paid user mark (hit way ahead of schedule)
Remember when I said Adobe wasn’t going to abandon the subscription-only plan. This is yet another reason why. This report was before they released the $9.99 Photographer’s bundle, so I imagine this number is now going to skyrocket. I’ve been talking to more and more photographers out on the road who are totally on board with this new deal, citing how hair the price is (and I agree). More about this below.

(4) Talking about Adobe’s $9.99 Photographer’s Bundle Deal on “The Grid”
If you missed the episode above of our weekly show for photographers, “The Grid,” in this episode we started the show with some important discussions about Adobe’s $9.99 photographers bundle. You can watch it right above.

(5) New versions of Photoshop and Lightroom released
Adobe has recently released new versions of both Photoshop and Lightroom 5 with new features and bug fixes. If you’re a Creative Cloud user, you can download the update from the Creative Cloud widget thingy. If you’re a Lightroom 5 user stand-alone user, you can download the Lightroom 5.2 free update  here (for Mac) or here (for Windows).

OK, that’s all the Photoshop news for this Tuesday, but….
I’ve got one more semi-related, yet totally not-related news: Tomorrow on “The Grid” it’s our popular “Blind Photo Critique” show, so If you’d like to have your work considered for tomorrow’s photo blind critiques (we show your images but don’t mention your name on the air), just leave us a link to 3 to 5 images that show off your work AT THIS LINK:

From those, we’ll pick 15 to 20 photographer’s work to go over on Wednesday’s show (not based on who posted first — we choose based on showing variety and images we think can help our viewers), and the live show is broadcast TOMORROW at 4:00 pm ET at  — join me and Matt LIVE tomorrow — See you then. :-)

I’m getting psyched!!! Here’s a few quick things stay on top of:

(1) We now have more than 1,000 photo walks organized in cities around the world
All the walks are now in place, as the deadline for creating new walks was this past weekend, so now it’s just about finding a walk near you.

(2) We have the biggest and best prizes for the photo contest ever!
Check out this link to see what our awesome sponsors have come up with.

(3) It’s not too late to join a photo walk in your city (it’s free).
Here’s the link to the official photo walk page — see if there’s one near you and join us on Saturday, October 5th for an experience you’ll never forget.

(4) Check out our Worldwide Photo Walk Webcast
Last year we did a free webcast with lots of helpful hints, suggestions, and we answered a bunch of questions people had about joining and walking, and you can watch it right here. 

(5) Order your official t-shirt right now (and help the Springs of Hope Orphanage)
We have awesome official Worldwide Photo Walk t-shirts, and not only do they look really cool (lots of folks wear them on their photo walk), but more importantly, 100% of the profits from the sale of these t-shirts  go to feeding, clothing and caring for the wonderful kids at the Spring of Hope Orphanage, Kenya. Our friend Rob Jones from Towner Jones Photography, came up with t-shirt idea and if things go well this year, we will have raised nearly $50,000 in just these six yearly walks. That rocks! Remember, even if you don’t want a shirt, you can still buy one to support the kids. Here's the link.  NOTE: We have special LEADER shirts as well (Leaders â” you'll find the link on your leader's dashboard).

OK, so that’s a quick update. I’m leading a local walk in Rome, Italy this year, and I’m hoping that some of the people that come to my walk speak some English, or we’ll just wind up going to a McDonalds. LOL!!!

Cheers everybody to a great Monday! :)

Cowboy Stadium has been at the top of my list for stadiums to shoot for a few years now, and yesterday I finally got the chance.

I had only seen it from the outside, a few years ago when I was doing my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it” tour in Arlington — it’s within walking distance of the convention center where we hold my classes, and it’s just an amazing feat of architecture and design, and when I found out I I’d be here a day early, I reached out over Twitter to find a contact with the Cowboys, and before you know it I was talking with Shannon Gross, Social Media powerful overlord for the Cowboys (and as luck would have it, a photographer).

Our shoot was set for 2:00 pm yesterday, and I was planning out my shoot in the morning when I realized that the massive overhead high-def screens would be black, I shot off a quick last-minute email to Shannon asking if we could get the Cowboy’s logo up on the screens for our shoot, and I would need a helmet (for the shot you see above), and Shannon scrambled to make both happen. This were some of the first dedicated stadium shots the Cowboys would have since the new AT&T branding (It’s now AT&T Stadium) and so I wanted to make sure there was something on those big screens.

These shots were taken with a Canon 5D Mark III using an 8-15mm Fisheye zoom lens, and I usually had it zoomed out to between 14mm and 16mm on a Gitzo tripod with a Really Right Stuff BH-55 ballhead. Contrast and Clarity added in Lightroom (except for on the turf field itself).

This shot was taken at the 50-yard-line, up high with a super-wide angle lens â” the 16-35mm set at 16mm.

The stadium itself was just amazing. The screen….well…what can you say about the HD screen — it’s just insane, but the whole facility is incredibly well designed, well thought-out, and just so focused on creating the ultimate fan experience.

Above: Brad snapped this iPhone shot of me during the shoot.

The Cowboys offer daily guided tours of the stadium, and so we’d wait until the short break between on-field tours to take our shots, so we’d get set up, check our email and stuff until the tour headed for the locker-room tour and then we’d have a nice empty field all to ourselves. We’d shoot, pack and move to another location and shoot until the next tour hit the field, so it was a pretty relaxing shoot, and we still had everything wrapped up in about two hours from start to finish.

Here’s one for the road, shooting right down the handrail toward the corner of the field. I have lots more shots, and some great stories, but I’ll have to save those for next week’s episode of “The Grid,” ’cause it’s time to hit the hay — big day tomorrow here in Dallas with my tour tomorrow, and I hope I’ll see some of you there.

A big thanks to Shannon Gross and the gracious folks in the Cowboys organization for the wonderful opportunity to take some shots for them (and for me) and I hope to see you all again real soon! Cheers. :)

Sorry for the late post this morning — I’m behind on….well….pretty much everything. LOL!! :)

So, last week we started something new for us over at — each week we’re broadcasting one of online classes from Kelby Training Online for free, all-day long, continuously for free. Last week we aired my Travel Photography Class (filmed on location in Paris, France), and this week, we’re airing PART TWO, which is where I do all the post-procesing of the shots taken in Part One using Lightroom and Photoshop, and I go through my entire workflow.

Each week, we’ll be continuously airing a different class, because we’re betting you're going to watch a couple of classes and you'll learn so much that you'll totally want access to the rest of our more than 300 online photography classes (it's only $199 a year for unlimited access or $24.95 a month). I hope you’ll jump over and check out Part Two of my class right here. Here’s the link. 

OK, I’m off to Detroit & Dallas for my seminars this week. If you read this blog, I hope you’ll stop me and say “hi.” I always get a kick out of meeting my readers in person. Cheers everybody to a great Tuesday!