Posts By Scott Kelby

Last week on my Facebook and Twitter pages, I posted a link to a Great article on Annie Leibovitz on “Getting the Shot, and the Future of Photography” over at FastCompany (shown below).

I have to say, her new campaign for Disney has made me a Leibovitz fan. Really brilliantly done, and the article has some great insights about shooting portraits. Worth a read (and the Disney photos are seriously very special).

Well, after I posted the link to the article (here’s the link by the way —- definitely worth the read:, a conversation started where some we’re trying to give anyone but Annie the credit for the amazing shots. They wanted it to go to anyone from the set designer to the post production people to the hair and make-up — anyone but her (and yes, it does take all of those folks and more to do something on the scale of what Disney hired her to do).

Anyway, it was our topic this week on “The Grid” and there were lots of great comments from the live audience, and of course, plenty of debate because we took it a lot further than that. The episode is at the top of the page if you’ve got a few minutes to check it out.

Also, the previous week, our in-studio guest was the amazing Peter Hurley, and he was there for our monthly “Blind Photo Critiques” episode and we featured nothing but critiques on portraits. There’s a LOT to learn from him in this episode. Here’ s that episode (below):

Shooting cars!
OK, today I’m in a local photo studio doing my first in-studio automotive shoot with a giant overhead softbox longer than the car. Wish me luck, and while we’re wishing, here’s wishing you a fantastic weekend. See you Monday! :)

I had one of my favorite shots from last football season made into a HUGE print with acrylic-photo mounting, and although you can’t really tell from this picture, it is just insane!!! The clarity and quality is just off the hook (I got this one from By the way, look how calm Brad looks holding this print. He had been drinking for hours. Well, as far as I could tell anyway.

One thing you can’t see from our photo is that the acrylic sits on top of the image, so I made a screen cap of their site (above) and you can see how it plays out. See how thick the acrylic is on top of the photo? That’s what gives it its look. By the way, if you’re wondering if all that acrylic adds to the weight of the image, it absolutely does. Big time! (Now, it’s not quite that thick on my giant wall-sized print, so it’s not crazy heavy, but on smaller images like one Brad had made of a concert shot, you can really feel the weight, so you probably don’t want to go walking around all day long carrying it. Just sayin’).

Anyway, I’m always looking for some new interesting way to display printed images, and I thought this one was pretty unique (Everybody that’s seen it in our offices always raves about how it came out). Once we get it hung (later this week, I hope), I’ll share a photo of it hanging over on my Facebook and Twitter pages.

Hope you all have a great Tuesday, and we’ll see you here tomorrow for Guest Blog Wednesday. :)

This weekend I ran across an Interesting article over on CNN about wedding guests taking photos when there’s already a pro wedding photographer hired by the bride and groom. Of course, sadly today that’s the norm, and different photographers deal with it in different ways.

Going “unplugged”
I think the really valuable takeaway from this article is the “unplugged” wedding concept (which they outline in the article), which basically has the bride and groom asking the guests not to take photos of any kind during the actual ceremony itself. Afterward, at the reception, or during the formals, it’s OK, but during the ceremony they’re asking them to please allow the photographer to do the job they were hired to do, and the guests can just enjoy…well…being guests.

Not only do I love this idea, I wouldn’t take a wedding gig where the bride/groom didn’t buy into this concept (which means I would probably starve to death as a full-time wedding photographer), but I believe I could make a pretty convincing case to the wedding couple that it will: (a) lower their stress (b) let their guests actually experience the ceremony as it happens, and (c) they’ll get the kind of images they hired a pro photographer for in the first place.

Sadly, (a) I wouldn’t always be able to convince them of this, and (b) some of the guests would complain that they can’t take photos during the ceremony (in fact, I believe the article mentions that very situation).

Besides the very timely and thought-provoking article, I learned about a new App you can integrate into your next wedding shoot (and use as part of this unplugged concept). Some very useful ideas here:

Here’s wishing you a totally unplugged Monday! :)



(1) Guess who is our in-studio guest on “The Grid” tomorrow?
Oh yeah–#shebang — it’s the man himself — Peter Hurley (wild cheers ensue!). The master of the headshot (see above) is in the house!

Here’s here working on a project with us, and he’s our guest tomorrow at 4:00 pm ET LIVE on the air. We might (I have to confirm with Peter first), do our blind critiques episode (in which case, it would be portraits only), so keep an eye out on my Facebook, G+ or Twitter pages tomorrow for the link to upload your images in case we go that route, but ya never know. Here’s the scoop:

Who: Peter Hurley, live in-studio
What: Tomorrow’s episode of “The Grid” (our weekly photography talk show)
When: 4:00 pm ET (New York Time)
Why: Because we do this every Wednesday at 4:00 PM ET

Join in the fun (and for the occasional crushing of people’s hopes and dreams).

(2) Help me find some place to go (be kind, kids)
My awesome, awesome wifey got me the most amazing birthday present — a photography trip (with my brother Jeff as my shooting buddy) anywhere in the world I want to go (as long as it’s someplace she wouldn’t want to go, so going back to Paris is probably out. LOL!).

My first thought was to go back to Dubai (It’s been like five years since my first visit), but this time I’d head to Abu Dhabi as well (which is a short drive), but now I’m thinking maybe I should go someplace else since I’ve kinda already been there. So, if you’ve got any ideas for really cool shooting locales that aren’t 25+ hours of flying time from Florida, I’m all ears (remember, if you can picture my wifey there with me, it’s probably off the list, so Bora Bora, Fiji, France, Spain, etc. or any place exotic or European is probably out). I’m thinking Moscow could be cool. Maybe Namibia (but my brother makes a frowny face when I mention Namibia). Anyway, I’m open to any cool ideas that won’t take me too far away for too long (five days would be ideal).

(3) My Lightroom 5 Book is Almost Here!
My Lightroom 5 book is on-press (well, it’s been on press for a while so it’s probably off press by now, or any day at the latest), and it’ll be winging it’s way to stores very soon (and by winging I mean just riding in a truck but that doesn’t sound nearly as exciting as winging), and I have reason to believe it will be arriving sooner than the bookstores online have indicated (just a hunch. Wink). Anyway, you can pre-order it right now if you’d like to over at Barnes & Noble, or Amazon, who both have screamin’ deals on it (around $34. Cheap!). Anyway, be the first on your block (heck, be the first on any block), to get your copy by pre-ordering now.

Well, that’s it for today. Hope you all have a great Tuesday and we’ll see you back here tomorrow for Guest Blog Wednesday-a-roonie (and don’t forget The Grid with Peter tomorrow).



Matt Klosklowski and I put this together a while back, but it’s maybe even more relevant today then we launched it. We got the inspiration from talking with photographers on our live tours in response to hearing the question, "Why should I switch to Lightroom? I already have the Bridge & Camera Raw?" or "I thought Lightroom was just the same as the Bridge and Camera Raw."Uggh!

It's particularly frustrating because Lightroom has so many advantages over the Bridge & Camera Raw, that you can't just explain it in few sentences so we created this page where we could point folks to it to really illustrate the reasons why, as a photographer, they should be using Lightroom. The next thing you know, we decided not only to make a list, but to create 100 videos that would really showcase the advantages.

Why 100 videos?
We intentionally did 100 very short (30 to 60 seconds each) videos rather than one long 60-minute plus video, so people could go directly to the topics that interested them most (since I doubt anyone would watch all 100, or would be willing to sit through 100 when they only needed a few to change their mind). NOTE: There is a little forward button at the top right corner of each video, which you can click to take you to the next video, in case you want to watch all 100.

If you're one of those photographers still using the Bridge & Camera Raw, take a few minutes and swing over to the site and check a few of the reasons out (and at the very least, watch the short intro that Matt and I put together to get you started).

Here's the link.

I hope it helps you at least want to download the free 30-day full-working trial version from Adobe, and give it a whirl (download link for Mac & Windows).


-Scott and Matt

P.S. We actually came up with around 121 reasons, but 121 reasons sounded kind of weenie, so we whittled it down to just 100.