Posts By Scott Kelby

Last week when I posted my detail shots of exotic cars from the duPont Registery’s in-house collection, a buddy of mine Karl-Franz Marquez dropped me a line about it, and included some shots he had taken of his own car, a beautiful Aston Martin Vantage that he also shot “Tim Wallace” style (after watching some of Tim’s online classes at KelbyTraining.com).

He had some taken some beautiful shots, and I was totally digging on his car, and Karl-Franz offered to drive over for the day (around 150 miles each way) to let me shoot this British made Aston Martin, and so yesterday we did an afternoon shoot, indoors at our headquarters inside our video studios.

Above: Here’s the behind-the-scenes shot of the image at the top of the page. That’s Karl-Franz holding a second flash to light the grill in the front of the bar (it’s half the size and power of the large soft box lighting the wheel and edge of the hood above). So, it’s two strobes total powered by the Elinchrom Quadra Ranger powerpack hanging from the light stand in front of me. Camera settings: ISO 100, Aperture f/22, Shutter Speed 1/200 of a second. Full power on the strobe. 

NOTE: The screen screen area behind the car is just there by coincidence — we rolled the car into that part of our video studio so we’d have room to shoot it —  it had nothing to do with our photo shoot (other than spilling green on the other side of the car so we could only shoot on one side).

Above: here’s a detail shot of the engine. I went back and watched Tim’s class and he had a segment on shooting engines so I just followed his instruction to get this shot. 

Above: here’s the behind-the-scenes shot of the engine shot you just saw. Just one light with a long strip-bank positioned opposite me. I’m shooting with a Macro zoom lens. 

Above: After watching Tim’s videos on shooting car details, there was something I missed the right time around, and it’s that he angles the wheels about 20° and it definitely does make a difference. 

Above: here’s the behind-the-scenes of the wheel shot. Not particularly glamorous — a lot of laying on the floor or shooting on your knees (fun on concrete). Just one light for this one. Same settings — shooting at f/22 (or up to f/32 in some cases) makes the light fall of fast to black. 

Here’s a few more shots from the day.

Above: Those three above are just using that one soft box with the long stripbank. All the settings are pretty much the same — f/22 to f/32 so the edges fall off quickly to solid black. I tried to fix a few mistakes I made during the duPont shoot. Luckily, Tim gave me some tips after I sent him some I was struggling with. Mostly, I think I wasn’t getting the softbox in close enough, and I wasn’t powering it high enough, and of course both of Tim’s comments were super helpful. 

Above: I don’t actually like this shot — it didn’t come out quite like I had hoped (I like my rear shot of the Ferrari last week much better lightning wise), but I’m showing it because I did pick up a great tip from Karl-Franz — and that is — he has a black license plate that he uses when shooting cars (seen here). It’s actually the flip-side of the dealer’s license plate that came with the car — how handy is that! :-)

Anyway, I liked the idea so much I ordered a blank, black custom license plate last night from Speedysigns.com (it was probably not the cheapest way of coming up with an all black license plate, but I was short on time). Anyway, hats off to Karl-Franz for the idea.

Above: Here’s our crew: that’s Karl-Franz’s girlfriend  wife Honey (her real given name); me in the center, and Karl-Franz (fake German guy who owns amazing sports cars and yet is a friend of Vanelli) on the right. 

Above: Seeing as we’re: (a) Shooting a car made in the UK, and (b) using techniques we learned from UK-based commercial automative photographer Tim Wallace, I thought I’d (c) wear my Marshall Amplification Union Jack shirt (legendary guitar amps made in the UK) to create a British “triple threat.” 

A big thinks to Karl-Franz for driving all the way over to our offices to let me shoot one of his cool cars; to Honey for being incredibly patient during the three-hour shoot; to Brad Moore for all his help and suggestions, and of course to the amazing Tim Wallace for helping Me, Karl-Franz, and thousands of other photographers by sharing his awesome automative lighting and shooting techniques.

P.S.  Good news — Tim will be back here in the States filming more classes for Kelby Training very soon (I haven’t seen the full slate of what he’s teaching, but I know I’ll be begging him to do one on lighting car interiors). :)

 

 

http://youtu.be/-26MPpzoJoA

Hi gang — other short video above explains how the Photoshop World Conference and Expo has evolved over the past few years.  It’s exciting to see how it’s grown and morphed into basically seven conferences in one. Check out the video and you’ll see what I mean.

Also, If you missed Wednesday night’s “Photoshop World-a-thon” here’s the free Rebroadcast

http://youtu.be/nspMtxVDwhQ

We all showed techniques from some of the classes we’re teaching at the Photoshop World conference (I did a retouching technique, a showed how to create book covers in Lightroom’s Book Module, and I did a live demo of how to set up a remote camera from scratch from my Shooting Sports class).

Everybody had really cool demos (Matt had an awesome one for post processing long exposures), plus we have some special deals (that are good until March 2nd), and the whole thing gives you a great idea of what its like actually being at a Photoshop (the next one’s in Orlando, April 17-19th). You can check out last night’s rebroadcast above.

Hope you all have an awesome weekend!

Cheers,
– Scott

Tomorrow, February 13 is Blind Critique day on The Grid! Matt and I will be joined by landscape, travel, and humanitarian photographer Colby Brown, so those are the types of images we’ll be choosing to critique tomorrow.

If you’d like to have your travel and landscape photos considered for tomorrow’s blind critiques (we show your images but don’t mention your name on the air), just leave us a link to your images AT THIS ADDRESS: http://kelbytv.com/thegrid/critique/

That’s the only place we’ll be picking images from, so don’t leave a comment here to submit your photos. Go there and pay close attention to the instructions at the top of the page for the best chance at being picked for critique.

We’ll pick 20 or so photographers’ work to go over on the show, and the live show is broadcast tomorrow at 4:00 pm ET. (Here’s a world time-zone calculator: http://bit.ly/JUuYUj — use New York City as our time zone). See you on The Grid!

Above: A Lamborghini Gallardo shot at the duPont Registry Headquarters in Clearwater, Florida.

When I was at Photoshop World in Las Vegas last September, I ran into an old friend, Manuel Obordo (literally, the guy who taught me Photoshop —- if you’ve heard any interviews about how I got started in this business, you’ve heard me tell the story of Manuel).

Manuel is the duPont Registry magazine’s Director of Technology (the duPont Registry is a luxury car and lifestyle magazine that’s hugely popular here in the USA, and I’ve been reading it, and drooling over the cars in it, as long as I can remember). When I saw him I asked if I could come and shoot some of their collection of cars (I had heard they always have all kinds of cool, and man did they ever). So, on Friday Brad and I went and did a location scouting trip out to their headquarters, and then yesterday Brad and I shot there from 2:00 pm to around 5:30 — all with just one strobe (an Elinchrom Ranger Quadra and then when its battery finally ran out from shooting at full power the whole time, a regular ol’ Elinchrom Ranger for the last car), and just one softbox — a 5-foot stripbank. That’s it.)

Above: A detail shot of a Ferrari’s F-430’s wheel.

Above: Here’s the rear of the Ferrari, lit so just the highlights show. It didn’t hurt that the Ferrari was already black. Also, there’s this program called Photoshop that helped here a bit, too).

Above: Here’s a behind-the-scenes shot so you can see the full rig. That’s Brad Moore with our strip bank and flash mounted on a monopod. The Ranger battery back is on the floor. If you’re wondering how the background went so solid black, it’s because I’m using the camera settings and techniques I learned from a KelbyTraining.com class from Award-winning commercial automative photographer Tim Wallace. I used an f/stop (in this case, f/22) and I got the softbox close enough to a very quick fall-off to the light. I used my Nikon D800 for this shoot so I would have loads of detail and file size.

So, while there are rows and banks of florescent lights above us, and through my view finder I can see the stacks of boxes in the background, and I can see right out the large windows, when I fire the flash, it crushes down the ambient light to nothing and only the light from the strobe lights the car. If you watch Tim’s class, you’ll totally get the technique. It doesn’t hurt to have really cool cars to use it on, though.

Above: Same light, but I had Brad move over to the left a bit and place the softbox at an angle to this view of the Ferrari and the engine compartment in the rear. Those highlights are the soft box reflecting in the car’s rear hood and glass.

Above: Here’s a close-up detail shot using a Macro lens; hand held with the same lighting set-up and settings.

Above: Here’s the set up I used for the hood shot, and for headlight detail shots.

Above: The previous five photos use the same everything; we’re just moving around the car. The cars were parked together really tightly and we couldn’t move the cars, so it made it pretty challenging some times (well, for Brad anyway).

Above: They also had a rare Corvette Sting Ray with Split Rear windows and I couldn’t help but get a few shots.

Above: Here’s one of the rear views [stop snicker — I meant the car] — still only that one soft box — the reflections are doing double-duty.

Above: Here’s a Behind-the scenes shot, and Brad is wearing the Elinchrom Quadra Ranger battery pack over his shoulder on the right. This was our first time with the new Lithium Ion battery and we couldn’t believe how light that battery pack was with it. Brad was super-diggin’ it.

Above: They also had a brand new Fisker Karma (first time I’d see one in person up close), so I wanted to shoot it as well. It’s hard shooting a white car, so we warmed up on this car. I only got a handful of shots I liked but at the end of the shoot I got this one I liked.

Above: To get the perspective you saw in the last shot I needed to lay down on the ground, and Brad mounted the softbox on a boom stand and put it just a little bit in front of the car, as seen here. I’m shooting tethered directly into Lightroom for most of the day, but later we were “runnin’ and gunnin’ so I shot directly to the card in my camera. This gives you an idea of how tight the quarters were to get side shots of the cars.

I took a lot more images, including images of a Harley Davidson Sportster and that 1937 Lincoln Zephyr on the left of the Karma I’m shoot, but I’m running out of space here.

My thanks to Tim Wallace — a brilliant teacher, amazing photographer, and terrific guy because I wouldn’t’ be shooting this stuff without learning his techniques first, so if any of them look OK, Tim deserves the credit.

Above: That’s me with Manuel “Manny” Obordo at Photoshop World last year. He’s usually much more smiley than he appears here. He’s a totally cool guy, smart as anything, and you don’t want to play him in golf  — especially for money. 

Also, a big thanks to Tom duPont, all the patient crew at the duPont Registry magazine, and especially my buddy Manuel Obordo (shown with me above) who not only made this shoot happen, but 20-something years ago taught me how to use the Pen tool, which I always felt was the biggest breakthrough I had in learning Photoshop, and the whole Photoshop thing has worked out pretty well for me so far, so although thanks isn’t nearly enough Mannyâ¦thanks!

Do you totally love Photoshop tips & tricks? Me too!
That’s probably why our NAPP-a-Thon a few months ago broke records. So much so, that we’re going it again, but this time it’s a “Photoshop World-a-Thon” where we'll be sharing a ton Photoshop tips LIVE from 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM ET this Wednesday night.

It's 90-minutes of cool Photoshop tricks to give folks an idea of what it’s like to be at the Photoshop World Conference & Expo (coming up in Orlando on April 17-19 at the Orange County Convention Center).

PLUS, we're giving away a Full Conference Pass to someone watching live EVERY 10 MINUTES!!!!

BUT, it’s getting crazier than that! We’re giving away everything from hotel room nights in Orlando during the conference to Walt Disney World tickets, to lots of cool stuff from the exhibitors that will be on our Expo Floor.

ALSO: We’ll be running some sweet deals on full conference passes, too so you don’t want to miss any of it!

It's going to be a blast, so join me and the gang this WEDNESDAY night!

Who: Matt, RC, Corey, Pete, and Me ("The Photoshop Guys")
What: A 90-minute love-fest of our favorite cool Photoshop tips
Where:  RSVP right here: http://photoshopworld.com/webcasts/ 
When: This Wednesday (two days from now) at 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm ET
(Here's a world time-zone calculator: http://bit.ly/JUuYUj - use New York City as our time zone).
Why: We hope that when you learn all this cool stuff, and get a preview of what it’s like at Photoshop World (we’re each going to preview some stuff from the classes we’re teaching), that you’ll say, “Yeah, this is the year….I’m going!” If you already want to go to Photoshop World — awesome — here’s where you can sign up now (and save $100 with an Early Bird discount on your Full Conference Pass).

Hope you'll join us there on Wednesday! We're gonna get tipsy! (wah, wah, wahhhh).

Thanks,

-Scott

P.S. Can you please invite your friends? Everyone's welcome and we want to get as many people to tune in as possible. Many thanks in advance. 

Hi Gang: Not really one big topic today, but here’s a bunch of quick stuff that’s going on:

A big thanks to the readers of Shutter magazine, who named me as one the Top 10 Most Influential in the Industry (I came in at #6). I am very grateful to everyone who voted for me, and to Shutter who did a feature on each of the top 10, and I included some caps of their article about me below (here’s the link to the article in Shutter, where you can read the interview and see all the winners, which included my buddy Joe McNally).

“10 Tips for Creating a Successful Portfolio”
Cliff Mautner (named one of the Top 10 Wedding Photographers in the World” by American Photo magazine) was our in-studio guest this week on “The Grid” (our free weekly show for photographers) and this episode is getting a lot of buzz. Our Topic was “10 Tips for Creating a Successful Portfolio” and Cliff was the perfect guest because of his insights into the world of wedding photography. Great episode and if you missed it, you can watch it right below.

http://youtu.be/_BH17M30Abg

 

The US Navy retweeted my Carrier Shot blog post
When I saw this on Twitter:

“@scottkelby got a once in a lifetime chance – take photos aboard CVN77. This AWESOME photos & blog –> ow.ly/htX1J”

I was so excited, and so honored, and just totally psyched!!!! Whoo Hooo!!!!

The Evolution of an On-Location Portrait Session
Our good friend Rick Sammon has a wonderful post today over on his blog called “The Evolution of an On-Location Portrait Session.” The images and behind-the-scenes stuff are terrific, and there are some real learning moments. Also, if you’re already a Kelby Training Online subscriber, make sure you check out Rick’s online classes (they have been really rockin’!).  Anyway, if you’ve got a sec, check out Rick’s post right here: http://bit.ly/14BTX67

Above: One of Rick’s shots from his post. Very cool stuff!

Tutorial: How to control the panning of still images and video in Photoshop CS6
Check out this Awesome Photoshop tutorial from our friend (and NAPP Photoshop Guru) Nicole S. Young for people who edit DSLR Video in Photoshop CS6 (and CS6 is perfect for photographers who want to edit video without learning a whole video editing program). Here’s the link: Way to rock it Nicole!!!! :-)

Big shout out to “Weekly Photo Tips” for their in-depth review of our magazine for photographers using hot shoe flash and studio lighting: “Light It Magazine” for iPad (above).

My favorite line from the review? It’s where they said:

“If I could only have one photography publication, it would be Light It, hands down.” Woot!!! :)

Here’s the link if you’ve got a second: http://bit.ly/YGBLVN

Psyched to see one of my shots from the aircraft carrier make PhotoExtract.com’s
“8 Top Google+ Photographs” list for January 29th!

Here’s the link: http://www.photoextract.com/plus-extract/2013/1/29 (Whoo Hoo!). :-)

Man, it’s be an amazing few weeks!!!!! My feet still aren’t touching the ground.

Thanks everybody for all your support, kind comments, and good vibes this past few weeks. Here’s wishing you a super-kick-butt weekend and we’ll see ya back here on Monday.

Cheers! ––Scott

P.S. Don’t make plans for Wednesday night — we’ve got something fun brewing! :-)

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