Category Archives Adobe

skport

Hey gang – this quick little video (below) is about an awesome portfolio feature that already comes with your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription (even with the $9.99 a month photographers bundle). It’s called “Adobe Portfolio” and it’s so easy to use that you can have your own custom online portfolio up and running in about 10 minutes without any additional fees (or any web programming experience whatsoever – anybody can do this easily). Check out the video below to see how this works:

https://youtu.be/UFye8O6fbwA

Hope you found that helpful — it’s one of those things that Adobe kind of snuck in there and it really adds value to their subscription (especially if you’re just paying the $9.99 a month, because you can pay more than that for a portfolio alone).

Hope that starts your Monday off right. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. In 10-days I’ll be in San Diego with my new seminar (on Thursday, May 12th) – hope you can come by. Also, a big shout out to all the photographers in Seattle & Portland who came out to my seminars there last week. Really enjoyed getting to meet so many nice folks. Thanks for making me feel at home so far from home :)

Mornin’ everybody. Here’s another one of those hidden little things that Adobe snuck into Photoshop CC kind of under the radar in one of those periodic CC feature updates.

Believe it or not this one was added back in 2014 but it’s hard to find someone that actually realizes it’s there. It’s a built-in filter for creating all sorts of frames around an image. Here’s how it works:

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Go under the Filter menu, under Render, and choose Picture Frame. If you just said, “What?! …Picture Frame?! Where did that come from…” you’re not alone.

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Here’s the Frame window. From the frame pop-up menu you can choose 40-something different frame types from the awesome to the absurd. The more traditional looking frames are toward the bottom of the menu, like this art frame shown above. Depending on which frame style you choose there are a bunch of sliders to tweak it to your heart’s content.

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I create a new blank layer before I open the filter, so I can resize the frame after it renders using Free Transform. I also added a soft drop shadow here just to add some depth.

I hope that started your week off with something new to mess around with in Photoshop, here’s wishing you your best week of the year (so far). :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Hey, if you’re a photographer in the Portland, Oregon area – I’ll be there next week (on Thursday I believe) with my Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (reloaded!) seminar. Hope you can come out and join me. 

teth1

Mornin’ everybody. I get a steady stream of questions about tethering into Lightroom (that’s where you connect your camera directly to your computer and when you shoot, your images appear really large on screen, instead of seeing them on the tiny 3″ monitor on the back of your camera). So this morning, I thought I’d quickly go through seven things you’ll probably want to know. Here goes:

  1. Not every camera can tether to Lightroom
    Here’s a list from Adobe of the cameras it supports for tethering. It’s pretty much Canon and Nikon cameras, with a few Leica camera models (the tethering in Lightroom requires camera manufacturers to provide Adobe with support for tethering to their cameras, so it’s not something Adobe can just decide to do on their own without their support).
  2. You can “super shrink” or hide the Tether bar (the heads up display)
    If you hold the Option key (PC: Alt key) and click on the little “x” in the top right corner of the bar, it will shrink the bar down to just a shutter button (yes, you can fire your camera’s shutter with that button). If you want to hide the bar altogether (but keep the tethering still active), press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T).
  3. That Table that holds my laptop is from Tethertools.com
    I always get asked where I got that table. There’s a company called Tethertools that does nothing but create accessories for people who tether, like the table. They also make an optional little slot under the table for holding an external hard drive; and (my favorite) a nicely designed pop-out drink holder (it’s handier than you’d think).
  4. How to recover from a stall
    At some point, without warning, your tethering will just stop. It’s not your fault, but you will have to know how to recover from a “stall.” First, make sure you camera is awake. If it goes to sleep to protect the battery life of the camera, it puts tethering to sleep, too. If waking it doesn’t work — turn the camera on/off. If that doesn’t work, turn off Lightroom’s tethering (choose Stop Tethered Capture from the File menu), and then turn it back on in the same place. Lastly, unplug and replug the USB cable from your camera and your laptop. One of those will usually do the trick and get you back up and running. BTW: my wife is a pilot and takes great umbrage with my use of the phrase “recovering from a stall” for tethering. Just sayin’.
  5. Canon cameras write a copy to the memory card in the camera. Nikon’s don’t.
    It’s just the way they’re set up by the manufacturer — it’s not Adobe showing a preference. On my 5D Mark III it writes to the compact flash card in the camera and I dig that because it gives me an automatic backup as I shoot, which is nice. NOTE: if you have trouble tethering to Nikon — try popping the card out of the camera.
  6. You might already have the cable you need to tether
    Nearly all cameras ship with the exact cable you need to tether — it’s simply a USB cable with a mini USB on one end (that connects to the mini-USB port on your camera) and a regular USB on the other to plug into your computer. So, go look in the box your camera came in (it’s in your closet) to see if you kept it (you probably did). If you didn’t, you can buy a USB cable online — just ask for one with a mini USB on one end, and a regular USB on the other. The one I use (the long orange cable seen above), is from tethertools. It’s orange so you can see it easier in a dark studio.
  7. Once tethered, you can do live client proofing to an iPad
    You can hand your client an iPad and have them see images from your shoot live on the iPad as you’re shooting (btw: clients super love this!). Not only that — they can see the shoot live on the Web, even if they’re not there (or, if they are there, they can share the shoot with a colleague or friend off site. I have a short video that explains the entire process below.

https://youtu.be/3qofLKdZ0uY

Hope you find that helpful, and hope it inspires you to give tethering a try. Once you do, you can’t imagine not tethering (yes, it’s that good!).

Best,

-Scott

apostapp1

OK, it’s not technically for just Instagrammers, and there’s nothing in the app that says it’s for using with Instagram, but it’s so perfect for Instagram, I can’t believe Adobe wasn’t thinking that way from the start (even if they didn’t say it).

The App is called “Adobe Post” (it’s free, and available for iPhone) and it lets you create all sorts of custom graphics with text for social media. While there are a bunch of apps that already do this type of thing, this one is particularly clever, thoughtfully designed and very fast and simple to use.

It comes with a bunch of pre-made, nicely designed, easily customizable templates for use as your starting place, but the way you can tweak and change everything (including trying out new color schemes with just one tap), makes it not only fast but actually a lot of fun.

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Above: This is the opening screen which shows a bunch of different templates (there are way more than you can see in the screen cap — they appear when you scroll down) — just click on the one you want to customize or “remix” as they say.

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Above: Once you choose a template to start with, you can use their built-in photos or your own. Here I took a photo and blurred the heck out of it first; and then imported it into the App as the background. Now you can choose different color palettes for the tint over your image and the text and the graphic (a rope circle in this case) separately. You can keep remixing these colors by tapping on the arrows over the color.

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Above: You can change design templates any time, along with different placements for your text (everything is pretty much editable at any time — you can change text, fonts, size, colors, templates, you name it). Here I changed templates, and then I uploaded a different photo. Just tap on those thumbnails below the image and it changes the layout.

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Above: I switched to an entirely different layout for a different photo (just a snap with my iPhone, and one of my favorite quotes from my wife — she said it to our daughter one morning and I still laugh every time I think of it). I changed the top text, the text below it, and tried different color palettes.

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Above: Here’s how it looks when uploaded to Instagram (yes, you can take your edited image from Adobe Post directly over to the Instagram App for posting).

Adobe Post is available FREE for the iPhone on the App Store (here’s the link).

Hope you find that helpful. Have a great Tuesday everybody!

Best,

-Scott

bestofyear

This is it — the very last day to get our best KelbyOne membership deal of the year. In short, here’s what it is:

A one-year membership, just $149 (our lowest price of the year), PLUS, you get two awesome bonuses (our Creative Pack full of Photoshop & Lightroom goodies, and my “Live From the Tampa Theater” full day seminar lighting and retouching seminar, from start to finish).

There are also great deals on Photoshop World Full Conference Passes (Save $300), and save a bunch on our latest books (including books by Peter Hurley & Jay Maisel).

Here’s the link: http://kelbyone.com/cyberweek

This all ends tonight at midnight, so “get ’em while they’re hot!”

https://youtu.be/dZWRnltgZ94

New Photoshop CC Features and Cool New Lighting Stuff
While out was out in Chicago (Brrrrrr!), RC and the gang had a great show on “The Grid, deoming the just released new features added to Photoshop CC, and we had Brandon from Westcott on to talk about some cool lighting gear. The whole show is right above.


seven7A big shoutout and thanks to MakeUseOf.com for not only naming KelbyOne as one of their “7 Awesome Sites for Learning How to Use Photoshop” but for writing:

“If you’re looking for one Photoshop-centric subscription, KelbyOne should be it.”

We’re excited and honored and doing a major happy dance. Their post is found right here. 


 

shootlike

Chicago Today — Tampa on Monday
Today I’m teaching my “Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (Reloaded)” seminar in Chicago, and on Monday I’ll be on my home turf with my last seminar for the year — I hope I’ll see you in one or the other (it’s not to late to get tickets for my Tampa seminar).

Hope you have a great weekend (Go Bucs!), and we’ll see you back here on Monday.

Best,

-Scott

When I was up in New York for Photo Plus Expo, one morning I got a chance to do a shoot at the incredible Morgan Library and Museum an hour before they open the doors to the public. I usually share stuff like this on storytelling site “Exposure.co” but this time I used the just introduced Web-editing feature of “Adobe Slate.”

Here’s the link to my shots (including behind-the-scenes shots and camera settings):

https://slate.adobe.com/cp/EvZRs/

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