Category Archives Events

> Join me Wednesday Night for a FREE online Webinar called "A Walk in Rome"
I did one of these after my trip to Cuba (called "Connecting with Cuba") and after last year’s Paris Photo Walk with “A Walk in Paris” and they were really well received, so I thought we'd do one about my images and photo book from Paris last week. If you're into travel photography, I've got lots of practical photography and Photoshop tips for you, PLUS a review of the Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-f/6.3 lens for full frame cameras, and I'll be taking your questions and comments live on the air.

What: “A Walk in Rome” Free Photography Webinar
Where: Here’s the link
When: This Wednesday at 7:00 pm ET

Plus we'll talking about my Worldwide Photo Walk (I held a local walk in Rome. I've got lots of fun stuff to share and some really helpful photo tips,so I hope you can join me (it's Free) at 7:00 pm ET Wednesday at this link. Also, can you help me spread the word? :) [NOTE: If you can’t make the live broadcast, we’ll start free rebroadcasts the following day].

> Worldwide Photo Walk Contest Deadline is TODAY at 12pm ET
If you want to get a chance to win some incredible prizes, including a Canon 70D camera (courtesy of the official Photo Walk sponsor, Canon themselves), plus all sorts of other amazing goodies, make sure you get your contest photo uploaded by TODAY at 12pm ET (New York time). Remember, if you don’t enter, you don’t have a chance of winning, so make sure you upload your best photo for a chance to win.

> A Different Perspective on This Past Week’s Photo Industry Scandals, PLUS How to Not Hate HDR (Well, not as much anyway)
This week’s episode of “The Grid” should be a wild one, as we’re talking about the recent scandals within the photography industry (but we have a different perspective on it), and although we’re not going to be able stop people from doing HDR (and we shouldn’t), maybe we can help them spot the telltale signs of “bad HDR” along with how to avoid it. It all starts with admitting you have a problem. LOL!! ;You do not want to miss this episode, which airs (as always) LIVE every Wednesday at 4:00 pm ET at this link. 

> My Shoot Like a Pro Tour is coming to DC
OK, even thought the seminar isn’t this week, I’m giving away two free tickets to the seminar this week, so it kinda counts. Just leave a comment here and you’re entered, and we’ll draw two winners tomorrow. All the details on the seminar are right here.  See you in DC.

> Learn Landscape & Travel Photography from Trey Ratcliff
Here’s the scoop on this just-released online class at Kelby Training Online from renown travel and landscape photographer Trey Ratcliff:

“Join Trey on location in New Zealand as a virtual participant in his landscape photography workshop. From sunrise to sunset, visiting streams, lakes, mountains, and hills, Trey takes you from one incredible setting to the next, all the while sharing his tips, tricks, and techniques for capturing breathtaking landscapes and high dynamic range photos.”

We’re already getting lots of great feedback from this new class, so if you’re a Kelby Training subscriber, you’ll want to catch it right away. If you’re not a subscriber, here’s yet another reason to join. 

> Catch Matt’s Lightroom Basics Class, streaming FREE until Thursday
Each week on Kelby Training Online we stream one of our classes continuously 24-hours-a-day absolutely free (in fact, it’s streaming right this very minute — just jump over there right now (or heck, anytime before Thursday) and watch the entire class, on us. So what happens on Thursday when this class stops? Another class starts streaming continuously for a week. Sweet!

We’re hoping you’ll like learning this this so much that you’ll want access to all our classes (nearly 400) any class, any time, on demand. Here’s the link to join (just in case). :)

OK, it’s a busy week this week. Let’s get to it! (and here’s wishing you a fantastic one!)

The Live event at the Javits Center in New York City is already sold out, but if you didn’t get a ticket, or you don’t live near New York City, you can still watch the event as it’s being streamed LIVE on Monday as it happens.

Here’s the link to sign up for the free live streaming. Hope to see you in person on Monday at the Javits, or online!

Have a great weekend everybody, and we’ll see you back here on Monday.


P.S. I’m doing a few sessions in the morning, but then I’m doing a live-shoot (fashion styling by the awesome Sophia Batson) in my session after lunch (starting around 1:15 pm New York Time), and then I’m handing the images off to Katrin and Julieanne to edit, retouch, and finish. Hope you can catch it.

The first one was amazing (here’s the link), and we had lots of folks asking us if we could possibly do another one but the problem is: there’s only one weekend left in this entire season where we could schedule another Professional Hockey Photography Hands-on Workshop.

But that weekend is April 26, 27, 28th, 2013. It’s on. Drop the puck!

Check out the video above for details — (it’s the original that explains the workshop — but it mentions the old dates, so don’t let that throw you).

The last workshop sold-out within the first two hours it was announced, so if you want to join us for this incredible hands-on workshop, down in Tampa at the Forum, on the ice, you gotta do it right now (it’s filled on a first-come, first-served basis). Space is limited to the first 22 people who sign up. Here’s the link to reserve your spot today. Time to Kick Ice!

Because of team/Forum scheduling this is the only other workshop we’ll be able to host this season, so we hope to see you there for a workshop you’ll never forget.

-Scott Kelby and Scott Audette

P.S. I’d bring a U/V Filter if I were you. ;-)

Above: Here’s our class group shot, taken with a remote camera mounted inside the goal. On Sunday morning we had a session just on mounting and using remotes. 

I thought from the beginning it was going be the coolest hands-on workshop I’ve ever been involved it, and it totally, totally was! (If this is the first time you’re hearing about, first go watch this very short video clip which explains the workshop).

Above: Here’s our workroom for the weekend, inside the VIP Club at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. Sweet digs!  (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s Scott Audette (far right) doing a presentation on what makes a good hockey photo; which types of shots make it, and which one’s don’t. Really eye-opening and candid. That’s me (left center) and Mike Carlson (far left). (Photo by Brad Moore)

I’m going to tell the story with captions, but here’s a 30-second synopsis:

(a) We had an awesome group of photographers in our workshop. Totally into it the whole time, and we saw lots of great shots throughout. It was a weekend of non-stop laughing, learning, and making new friends.

(b) Tampa Bay Lightning’s Team Photographer Scott Audette did an absolutely kick-butt job from start to finish. His insights, tips and real-world advice really resonated with the class. He really worked hard to create something very special, and it showed. What a great teacher! (I picked up a ton from him myself).

(c) Our guest speaker, pro-sports photographer Mike Carlson was a tremendous addition to the workshop and everybody loved him.

(d) We were all, and still are, amazed at the incredible access we had throughout the workshop (hats off the Scott and the entire Lightning organization who totally supported the workshop from the start).

Now onto the workshop, which started off Friday night with a “Burgers & Beer” get-together, followed by a presentation from Scott and Mike covering everything from Safety to Camera Settings. Apparently, the safety briefing wasn’t for nothing (see below).

Above: Yup, that’s what his 70-200 f/2.8 lens looks like after getting hit with a puck during Saturday night’s game. He’s OK but the lens, wellâ¦not so much. Luckily, he wasn’t hurt, and he had a great attitude. Plus, the great folks at (totally awesome lens rental company —- I rent from them myself), helped ease his pain and gave him a $150 gift card while his lens is being repaired. How cool is that! We went to great lengths to warn our students about the realities of shooting “at ice level through the openings in the glass” but after this, they totally got it.

Above: Here’s a view of the class while they’re working on shots from the Lightning’s morning skate. The class shot from the first Mezzanine and the shooting holes at ice level (we rotated students in/out). I taught a session on post processing with Photo Mechanic and Lightroom, and my latest sports photography workflow. (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: After the class had some time to work on their images (and I answered a number of  one-on-one post-processing questions), we did some in-class blind critiques.  Scott Audette’s and Mike’s comments were incredibly helpful and the class SO got it!!!! (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: I did shoot the pre-game warmups from the ice (my buddy Brian Blanco was covering the game and let me shoot some of the warming from his assigned position). Guess what — my 80-400mm lens took a direct hit shortly after this photo was taken, but thankfully it didn’t crack the glass; though it cracked the plastic outside ring around the lens in a couple of places, and smeared the glass with ice, but luckily it wiped right off. (Photo by Brad Moore)

Game Night
After a dinner break, we all came back and got ready to shoot that night’s game at the Forum: The Tampa Bay Lightning vs. the Carolina Hurricanes (great game, especially since the Lightning won 4 – 1). The class shot from both “Overhead” locations (shooting spots at the first mezzanine level, which give an unobstructed view of the entire rink) and from 3 shooting holes at ice level (we rotated the students each period). I shot from the overhead positions and with Scott & Brad Moore’s help, we mounted a remote camera up in the ceiling of the forum aiming down at one of the goals.

Above: Here’s one of my shots from the remote camera up top. You guys know how I love remotes!!!! :-)

Above: Thank God for Brad Moore, who climbed with Scott up to the rafters way up above the ice (since I am, wellâ¦scared to death of heights) and rigged my D3s in place with a couple of magic arms. Lots more on this later this week, but for now, here’s the view from the rafters. Yikes! (don’t look down Brad!).

Above: Although I’m not a “climb up in the ceiling” kind of guy, I don’t mind hiking up to the top of the stands for a wide-angle shot or two, and I got this one as the Lightning scored their 2nd goal of the night. 

Above: Here’s workshop participant Matt Sunday shooting during the game Saturday night from one of the ice-level shooting positions with a hole in the glass (photo by Pete Collins). 

Above: One of our shooting holes at ice-level — you can’t get much closer to the action than this! (Photo by Pete Collins).

Above: Shooting from the 1st mezzanine shooting locations (you only needed a 70-200mm or a 300mm tops). It’s MUCH easier to capture the action from up here, and most of the images chosen as finalists for the “end of workshop competition” were taken from this overhead angle which offers an unobstructed view of the entire rink, and much less chance of being hit by a puck square in the face or having it break your lens and/or nose. This is where I shot from during the game (this isn’t my first rodeo). (Photo by Pete Collins).

Above: She’s rockin’ that 300mm — right over the glass with a clear view of both goals. (Photo by Pete Collins).

Above: Sunday morning kicked off early with a session on setting up and using remote cameras. Scott actually makes (and sells) the enclosures approved by the NHL for remote cameras inside the goal, and he knows this stuff inside and out. He set one up in the goal and the class all got to take remote goal shots with two skaters rushing the goalie. It made for some awesome shots (and we got together for that group shot at the top of this post). (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s one of the goal cam shots; this one taken by workshop participant Thomas Quinn.

Above: Here’s Scott and his assistant Casey (she was awesome and helped out the entire workshop), showing the class how to rig an “ice level” remote.

Above: After the remote camera session, we put on “grippers” and headed out to the ice to do some portrait lighting. We set up three stations and broke into groups of seven. Here’s my station where we’re shooting with a Nikon SB-900 and a pop-up 24″ softbox. Once it was set-up, each student got to direct the subject, try out different settings and poses. (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s one of my test-shots from my hot-shoe flash station. I did two looks: (1) One dramatic look where I clamped down on all the ambient light and let the background fall to black (shown above), and (2) One where we lots of the ambient light show and it was clear he was at center ice.

Above: Going over the different settings with my group. I used some of the new PocketWizard Plus IIIs to trigger the flash, and I’m totally digging them (everybody brought their own PocketWizards). One student brought the new PocketWizard Plus X (which I talked about a few weeks ago), and it rocked — the model of simplicity. (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s Mike (2nd from left) at his  shooting station (we rotated groups so everybody got to shoot at each station with each athlete). On the far left is Ingo Meckmann, a very cool guy, and darn good photographer, who came all the way from Lucerne, Switzerland to attend the workshop.  (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s Scott’s shooting station and a three-light portrait set-up using his Elinchrom BXRI’s. (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: Here’s one of the goalie portraits (photo by workshop participant Ingo Meckmann) 

Above: After the portrait shoot, it was back to our workroom for another post-processing session, and then everybody gathered their best three images from the game on Saturday night to enter into our “Blind Critique” Contest. The winner would take home the coveted “Kick Ice” hockey trophy (shown below) and besides insane bragging rights, they won a full-conference pass to the Photoshop World Conference & Expo.  (Photo by Brad Moore)

Above: The best shot from Saturday night’s game walks away with with cool trophy and bragging rights to last a lifetime!

Above: Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a winner! From L to R: Scott Audette, Yours Truly, our “Kick Ice” trophy winner, photographer Thomas Quinn, and Mike Carlson (the human trailer hitch).  (Photo by Brad Moore)

The Wrap Up
You know what was really cool? The whole time, the teachers, the students, the assistants — everybody knew we all involved in, and experiencing something really unique and that feeling just ran through everything we did. The group got close really fast (we shared a lot of time and meals together, including a wonderful lunch over at the Columbia Spanish Restaurant), and even though we all came through the doors of the Forum as strangers, by the end we all left as friends.

We all learned a lot (the students and the teachers), and the entire workshops was permeated with laughs and learning and that sense that we had all been a part of something really special. Something that happens just once. Or..ya know…maybe twice. ;-)

Thanks to Scott, Mike, Casey, Brad, my wonderful assistant Susan Hageanon who did a fantastic job organizing the event, and to Pete Collins who came to help out and share some “Pete-a-cisims,” and of course to the wonderful folks at the Tampa Bay Lightning and The Forum whose support and enthusiasm for this workshop from the very beginning helped make this dream a reality. #kickice

A big part of the fun and excitement of going to photography conferences is finding the newest and coolest gear on the expo floor! If you weren’t able to make it to WPPI 2013 in Las Vegas this week, the Kelby Training team has you covered with video features of some of the latest gear they discovered at the expo. Here are just a few of the videos, and you can find more at the Kelby Media Group YouTube channel.

Nikon D7100 & Nikkor 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G

TetherTools TabStrap and Look Lock

HurleyProGear Medusa LED

SpinLight 360

Westcott Rapid Box

You’ve got to watch the video above — it explains the whole thing, but I’ve got to tell you — we are incredibly excited about this. We put a lot of work into making something really unique and really special, but  it’s only for 20 very cool, very lucky photographers, and I hope you’re one of them. I hope you can join me (and Scott — watch the video) for one of the coolest workshops ever! I am not kidding! :)

Here’s the link to sign up -

P.S. Scott and I will be answering your questions here on the blog, but give me a chance to wake up and at least have a cup of coffee or two! ;-)  This is going to be (wait for it….wait for it….) edit. No, epic!