Category Archives Guest Blogger

Myself, my daughter Isla, my wife Nichelle, and Oliver the Pomeranian in our 2011 Christmas family portrait

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays everyone.

Four years ago, my friend Jessica asked me to take a picture of her and her boyfriend Brian to send out to friends for the holidays.  This was not really the type of thing I typically do, but Jessica is a good friend and a really creative person, so I agreed.  It would be fun.  Jessica happens to be an amazing producer with a great sense of humor, so I knew it wouldn’t be your typical family portrait.

When the shoot day arrived, the studio was filled with bags of old sweaters, tights, tutu’s, suspenders and some pretty funny props.  It looked like tacky Christmas threw up all over the studio.  It was awesome.

It didn’t take long until I was laughing so hard I was crying during the shoot.  It was a completely new experience for me.  I have had some laughs at photo shoots before, but never to the point where I was crying.  When it’s personal work, and you have total freedom, you can laugh so hard you cry.  Who knew!?  That shoot got me thinking about photography in a different way, and really opened up my eyes to something new.  Humor, and laughter have always been a big part of my life, but learning how that can be integrated into my photography was an exciting thing.  It was also a good reminder of why I like photography so much, and why it is so important to shoot what you enjoy.

I took so many pictures that day, it was hard to narrow them down.  But eventually I landed on a few selects I liked the most.  After thinking a little about the shoot and how much fun it had been, I really wanted to do something similar with my family.  How fun would it be do do something like that every year.  Especially when you think about 20 years from now, and how great it would be to have a collection of amazing family pictures.  It would be a really great way to look back and not only see how people have grown and changed, but also how I have developed as a photographer.  And also to see how my interests and style adapted over the years from picture to picture.

Over the next few years, I continued to take a Holiday picture of Brian and Jessica, but we also did a shoot with my family.  The first year of our family photograph, we went the Christmas sweater route,  but I wanted to add some additional subtle plot points. I decided to be in a wheel chair with a sling and a neck brace, which came about from a sledding accident with my pomeranian Oliver, who also had a bandage on his leg. And my sister Allison is holding him.

It went over really well, and it was fun to see the picture up on walls and refrigerators when I visited friends and clients. The next year, I put a lot more thought into our picture, and came up with the idea to do a snow scene with yeti.

Having mostly been a portrait photographer at that point, I had been developing a new interest in environmental images, and that interest ended up working its way into our family picture.  Our annual Christmas pictures are not only becoming a fun family tradition, but they are a great way to show potential clients my style, as well as who I am as an artist.  Photography is not just something I do for work, but it is literally an extension of who I am and how I think.  I am already looking forward to next year’s shoot.

The pictures of Brian and Jess from our very first shoot have gone on to heights I never imagined.  TV shows, magazines, billboards, posters, Holiday party invites.  I wish most of these uses were legal and approved by me, but that’s the power of the Internet I suppose, and a story for another time.  As I look back on 2011, I am happy to say I am enjoying photography more than ever thanks to fun personal projects like this.  Each year is more fun than the last, and I look forward to taking on new challenges and ideas in the new year.

So what new things are you interested in?  Who are you as an artist, and how does your personality influence your work?  In the coming year, I encourage you to look for new ways to challenge yourself and try something new.  I never would have thought family pictures would be something I could tie into my commercial work, but as they say.  You never know until you try.  Thanks for reading, and I hope you are able to finish out 2011 laughing in a cheesy Christmas sweater.  It’s the best way to end the year.

You can see more of John’s work at, follow him on Twitter, and “Like” him on Facebook

Writing the guest post for Scott Kelby’s blog is intimidating. Consider the giants of the industry who have posted here before – masters of lighting, composition and post production – skilled teachers who make complicated techniques simple and practical.

I thought about what I could add and kept coming up blank. I tried to work out the reason behind any success that I’ve ever had apart from blind luck and then it hit me, I’ve always relied on the strengths of someone else.

To have a career in photography requires competency in all sorts of disciplines; art, business, social media, networking – it’s a never ending list and those are just the general strengths needed. Specific fields of photography require specific competencies: consider how all the best wildlife photographers have an intimate knowledge of animal patterns and behavior. To have strengths in all of these disciplines is next to impossible for an individual. At some point it makes sense to outsource your weaknesses to someone else, allowing you to focus on your strengths.

Working in Iceland was one of the highlights of my career. Planning and coordinating shoots from another country required extensive planning and attention to detail, a weakness that I outsourced.

My love affair with photography began at the same time I met Tina, the woman that I would marry. Intuitively, I knew that if I was to spend any time learning photography, I would have to include Tina. She was so surprised when I arrived home with a camera for her (it wasn’t even her birthday). She was even more surprised to find out that I had booked a job involving both of us, leaving her two weeks to learn photography.

Our profile picture is a caricature of us at this point. I was technically competent and knew camera and lighting techniques whilst Tina had a well developed artistic eye. The job involved me setting up the cameras and lighting whilst Tina did the actual shoot – with all of 2 weeks’ worth of experience.  Against all logic, the shoot went well and our photography partnership began. We’ve been working together for six years and in retrospect, most of what we’ve done wouldn’t have been possible as individuals.

Flawless Moves, a London dance group, commissioned us to create promo images for their performance in Street Dance. Whilst Tina worked with multiple lights to create the images for the brief, I noticed beautiful window light highlighting one of the members. I used the light to create a series of black and white portraits completely different from the setup scene. Working as a team enabled us to offer something extra.

Our first commercial opportunity was a dream job. At the time we were living in East London, South Africa. An advertising agency had been contracted to promote the city who, in turn, were looking for a photographer to create the imagery. The advertising agency contacted us after finding our Flickr stream through a Google Image search (this has happened more than once). We were to meet the agency the following day to discuss the possibility of working with them. I was so excited about the job that I spent the entire night going through every possible conversation in my mind.

By the time the meeting began, I was a wreck to say the least. I was over thinking every question and panicking that the conversation wasn’t panning out as it did in mind the night before. As I tried in vain to steer the conversation in that direction, it became painfully awkward and I expected to be dismissed without any further consideration. Fortunately Tina took over, laughing and joking with the client, showing them that we were real people who would be enjoyable to work with. Because of Tina, we were hired to produce imagery covering architecture, landscapes, portraits and in-water surfing. It is still one of the most challenging and exciting jobs we’ve ever done.

One of the images from that first job.

Later, we were contacted by SA Rugby magazine to photograph Butch James. I was delirious with excitement, being a massive rugby supporter and follower of the Springboks. Butch James is a Springbok legend, helping the team win the 2007 World Cup. Rugby is to a South African what football is to an American. When I told Tina about the shoot, she seemed mildly indifferent. As someone with no interest in sports, she didn’t even know who we were photographing.

On the day of the shoot, I was focused on meeting and exceeding the brief hoping to impress the magazine. After taking over 200 images, I passed the camera on to Tina to go and tinker with the lights. She took about 10 images and managed to do something I had completely overlooked – she connected with the subject and created an engaging picture. The editor chose one of her images as the cover of the magazine and I enjoyed the irony.

The image on the right is the cover image of Butch James. A month later, having learnt my lesson, I handed the camera over to Tina who once again shot the cover image on the left.

Now that we’re based in London, the bulk of our commercial work is fashion based.  People who know me find this quite amusing. Whilst I enjoy working with people and love location based portraiture, I have never been called a fashionista. At the first London Fashion Week we attended, one of the fashion personalities did a triple take when he saw me in jeans and a hoodie. He literally needed three looks just to confirm how badly dressed I was. Tina on the other hand gets fashion. She understands that making the clothing look good is just as important as making the model look good. I can’t tell you how many times she has saved me from hours of retouch work, just by being attentive and understanding styling and fashion.

Fashion – an art that I rely on Tina to understand.

Recently we have been doing quite a few dance related shoots, another field where I am completely lost but Tina understands.

I’ve been saved by Tina’s sparkling personality, her ability to engage with people and her keen sense of style. So how have my strengths helped us? Well I can carry a lot of gear and generally take care of post production, but what I bring to the business is that I dream up crazy ideas and put us  into the sort of situation that Tina’s strengths have to get us through.

This is one of those situations I put us in that felt quite scary at the time. We shot this guerilla style, getting the athlete in place than back to safety in under 30 seconds.

The biggest breakthroughs in my photography have not been as a result of a magic piece of equipment, new post production technique or social networking. They’ve resulted from passing off my weakness to someone else and focusing on what I can do well.

Thank you Brad and Scott for the opportunity to write this post. Both of you epitomize teamwork and my own story owes a lot to your example.

You can see more work from Jon and Tina at

In the beginning…

A really long time ago there was a Photoshop book published by an up-and-coming Photoshop trainer, you may know his name; and it was called Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks. I remember I saw the book on a colleagues desk. I was working for a newspaper in Bradenton, FL not too long after I had graduated from the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, FL. I was immediately intrigued and started flipping through it and was amazed at how simple this stuff looked; I knew I had to have this book.

I was so excited that I went to the bookstore that day to get my own.  Remember, this was at a time when Photoshop training wasn’t nearly as ubiquitous as it is now; especially cool stuff like this. I actually still have my original copy. The point I am trying to make is that this was when my eyes started to open. I was realizing what was possible and eagerly studied through every tutorial, some of them several times. Not because I didn’t get them, but because I would experiment with several different images. I would even mix up tutorials throughout the book into ways I had not thought of before, and that is what made the difference.

I already had a desire to learn Photoshop, but I had never truly been inspired to learn it. In the profession I was headed into, I needed to know the software. There was a lot of training material on learning the nuts and bolts of the program, but nothing out there really gave you that spark to take it to the next level.  I was hooked and hoped that another one would come out soon.

It seems I wasn’t the only one who thought the Down & Dirty book was great! The series went on to become a tremendous success for Scott Kelby, he continued with several installments as newer versions were released up to CS, and they were also available in a Photoshop Elements series. However, with the swift proliferation of digital photography, Scott has begun concentrating his efforts into his deep passion for photography; and I think you all know how that has worked out. That doesn’t mean the popularity of the series waned, because the books had continued success long after newer versions were released. However, fans were left wanting more!

A New Era

In 2006 I was working at a large-format printing company as the lead designer and production manager. Unhappy with my job, I spent my days working there and spent my nights pouring over Photoshop books, experimenting with Photoshop. I was doing everything thing I could to master the program and figure out how to do cool stuff with it. I was even getting consistent freelance work and word was getting around. I had been a NAPP member for years, had already attended at least 6 Photoshop Worlds, and won a couple Guru awards.  Then the opportunity of a lifetime landed on my computer screen. NAPP posted a video on the NAPP member home page of the Photoshop Guys: Scott Kelby, Matt Kloskowski, and Dave Cross basically posted a casting call for the next Photoshop guru. I knew this would be my chance, but was my work good enough? I hadn’t had the best professional resumé up to that point but felt really good about what I could do with Photoshop. I put together a whole promo kit and sent it in; this got me an interview with Scott himself at Photoshop World in Vegas. Real one-on-one time with the man whose books I had stacked on my desk. Nervous as I was, the interview couldn’t have gone better and a week and a half later I was offered the job.

Now I was in the big leagues! For a lot of designers, this was the big show. Seeing every day the people I had only seen at Photoshop World and at seminars; this was crazy. It took me a while to adjust, but I eventually found my groove and was producing content that people really enjoyed. I did my best to come up with new, fresh stuff because I knew designers were bored with what was out there. I knew, because I was one of them. I knew I wanted people to feel that same energy I get when an idea starts to take shape. Creativity comes in spurts! It’s like when people meet a comedian in public; people always have the urge to ask them to say something funny right then. If you are a creative designer, you know that some days, ideas come together in seemingly magical ways. Other days you just want throw yourself on your Wacom pen. As I got more creative with my content, things started getting noticed, and I was starting to build a modest fan base that were closely following my work.

All the while this is going on; the fans were still craving more from the Down & Dirty book series. It had been quite a few years since the last one. In 2009, Scott Kelby decided to bring the Down & Dirty series out of retirement to write a new version for Photoshop CS4. This time, I was extremely honored to be asked by Scott, to write a special 3D chapter at the end of the book. 3D was a new thing in Photoshop, and he saw how much fun I was having with it. In addition to coming to work for him, this was another dream come true! He was now asking me to contribute to one of his best-selling books. Though on hiatus for a few years, this book proved the series is still loved by fans and they immensely enjoyed this newest edition. It also prompted a reboot of the Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks seminar, which Scott and I both taught on the road throughout 2009 and 2010.

After 5 years, contributing to the CS4 Down & Dirty book, doing the Down & Dirty Tricks section of the Photoshop User magazine with Felix Nelson, and helping to teach the Photoshop Down & Dirty tricks seminar tour, I have been given the opportunity to author my own book. Not just any book, Scott decided to pass the Down & Dirty torch to me and allow me to completely write a reboot of the franchise called Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks for Designers. I was beside myself! Here I am, this guy that pretty much got started early in my career with this series, and now it comes full circle. I now get the opportunity to inspire others with the same kind of thing that inspired me. That seems to be the real question: How do you inspire with what inspires you? I hope you will have a look at this new book and see! Even if you are not a designer, you are still a curious human being. Have a look and see how ideas come together and learn how to see things differently.

Here are some examples from this newest edition. I not only wanted to include typical design stuff like text and graphics, but wanted to show you what you can really do with photographs as well. Whether it’s a stock image or my own, as a designer, I see photos as merely components to my overall designs. I often shoot things for Photoshop knowing I am going to do with it later, but rarely actually what I will use it for. An example would be these two images. You can see how they started as simple studio shots and then became fully realized concepts. These are step-by-step in the book!

Here are some other couple examples that include text. The Musketeer image was inspired by the film Three Musketeers that was just in theaters recently. It demonstrates building an image out of several parts to create an overall title effect. The chrome logo was inspired by the logo for the new car from Fiat. It is pretty much created from scratch and the book lays this out step-by-step same as the Musketeer image.

Lastly, I just wanted to share a couple examples from the new 3D chapter. I am really excited about this chapter because it’s jam-packed with cool stuff. Like this first one with the paint splash, looks 3D huh? Well, it is actually a 2D photo and text converted into a couple flat 3D Postcards and positioned to give that illusion.  In the other example, I have a fully realized 3D logo built entirely in Photoshop complete with lights, reflections, and shadows…and the book covers it step-by-step!

Well, there we have it! Just a sampling of the jaw-dropping techniques you will learn in this new edition. Hopefully the Down & Dirty series will continue to live on to inspire a new generation of designers. I think Scott started a phenomenon in this series and I’m so very blessed to be a part of its legacy. Most importantly, it is you that I hope enjoys it most. After all, it is you for whom it was written. Take this road map and find that eureka moment!

You can keep up with Corey over at and order Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks for Designers at

Hey everyone, Jeremy Cowart here. A little over 2 years ago, I launched an idea here on Scott’s blog called Help-Portrait. I had no idea if it would fly or not. But it was worth a shot. 3 years later, photographers around the world have embraced the idea and have reached out to their communities and made a massive impact in helping and serving others.

And with the growth and success of this idea, I’ve had to grow the Help-Portrait team to continue making it all happen. People seem to think that it’s just me running this organization, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. There is a truly remarkable, selfless, all-star team of people around me that are helping make Help-Portrait happen. They are working year-round on making Help-Portrait a success and I’m constantly inspired by them. So I wanted to take this opportunity for you to get to know them a little bit and see why they’re so awesome.

So without further ado and in no particular order, let me introduce you to my Help-Portrait team!

Name and your job title/role for Help-Portrait:
Kyle Chowning – Executive Director + Board member – Oversee the overall planning, development and execution of the Help-Portrait operations

What’s your favorite moment from your Help-Portrait experiences so far?
My favorite moment was the first year, when we worked tirelessly to pull off the very first Help-Portrait. I remember stepping back and watching hundreds of people come through our event getting their picture taken—often for the first time in a very long time, or ever, and seeing the smiles on their faces. They were so appreciative. Truth is, they were doing more for me that I was doing for them. Easily one of the most memorable days in my life to-date.

Why do you believe so much in Help-Portrait?
Not being a photographer myself, I believe in Help-Portrait not because of what it does for the photography industry, but for the subjects: women who never felt beautiful, knew they were beautiful; homeless people who were typically avoided, engaged and became rock stars, even if just for a moment; lack of confidence turned into confidence; shame turned into pride; rejection turned into acceptance; sadness turned into excitement; hopelessness turned into the promise of something new; unemployed and homeless now had a professional portrait to share with prospect employers; the list could go on and on. All of this happened with a simple click and a print. Who wouldn’t want to be a part of that story?

Why should others get involved with Help-Portrait?
If you’re a photographer…


First off I’d like to thank Scott and Brad for giving me the opportunity to write today’s Guest Blog. I’m really very proud to be the first German on here, after meeting Scott this year in Cologne in Germany on his ‘Shoot it, Light it, Retouch it’ tour. (Or has ‘Calvinizer’ Calvin Hollywood maybe also written a contribution!?!?)

Well, OK, just to be sure, I won’t talk about photography in today’s blog. Instead I’ll devote my attention to the topic of Computer Generated Imaging.

The first time I came across CGI was about 4 years ago. I was so fascinated that I immediately gave up my job as advertising director with a major company in order to be able to concentrate completely on my own creative work.  In 2009, along with my partner Thomas Bach, I set up a studio for photography, CGI and post production: we called it the ‘bildbotschaft’, which you could translate as ‘the message of the picture’ but also as an ‘an embassy for good pictures.’

For me CGI is just like painting. The only limitation is your own imagination. Practically it is possible to use any motif you want to work with. Any object can be built up as a 3D model; then decide on any material you want, set up your scene, position your camera where you want it and light everything exactly as you imagine it should be lit. So many possibilities are available that you don’t have in photography (when taking pictures of the real world). The scope is endless. The whole world is yours – to do with it what you wish. There are just no limitations.

I have just finished a motif which shows an ‘Italian leaf blower’.  I should mention that in Germany all the vehicles used to clean the streets of a town or city are orange in colour, but you won’t generally see a Lamborghini used to clean leaves off the streets ;-)

This motif is entirely realized using CGI, i.e. all the picture elements (vehicle, surroundings, leaves) are built up from polygons. In the pictures below you can see the respective polygon model, a lighting realisation without materials, and the materials selected.

For CGI  I work mostly with Cinema4d und VUE Infinite, which I find is a good combination for almost all the tasks. After rendering, of course it goes into Photoshop to give it the appropriate look… for CGI in particular, you can’t work without Photoshop.

To spark your interest in Computer Generated Imaging even further, here are another couple of motifs that we created last year:


I call this picture ‘highway exit amusement park’. It is a composite, made up of CGI elements and my own photographs. You can also find this beautiful and amusing picture in the book Graphis Photography Annual 2012, The Best of International Visual Communications. Winning this award is also something I’m particularly proud of this year.

Some of you, I’m sure, already know my light bulb motif.

About a year ago The National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP) chose this picture as ‘Image of the Week’.

Beauty and the Beast (Autounion Type D)


And another NAPP ‘Image of the Week’: ‘Aviatophobia’.  I remember there was some discussion on the web and in Corey Baker’s blog about how I had created this picture. The answer is: CGI.

FullCGI of my Riva BG Viper II

Just 3 images of my series entitled ‘Designer Drugs’, which I created as a free artistic work in order to offer a new visual interpretation of designer drugs.

Here is my Rollercoaster. And I am still looking for a couple more volunteers to take a ride on it.

If you enjoy my work and would like to see more of my pictures, then I’d like to invite you take a look at my NAPP Portfolio or to visit my website at

I look forward to future contact.

P.S.  Just to finish, I’d really like to answer a question: Brad asked me in preparing for the blog whether I at the beginning of my work already know what the picture will look like in the end. Well, Brad, I’d so like to answer that question with a ‘yes’, but the truth is that all my pictures develop as I work on them. Which is also really good!

Am I good enough? It’s a question that I have often asked myself.

When I am entertaining the idea of a new venture or project, a leap into unfamiliar territory, the question pops into my head accompanied with an all too familiar physical sensation of tightness in my chest and the palpable quickening of my heart.

Can I do it? Do I have what it takes to make it happen?

I was examining the answer to those questions while doing an exercise in which I needed to create a timeline beginning from the completing of high school to today. In it, I needed to document my professional life as well as my personal life and note the high points and low points of both.

Admittedly, I didn’t look forward to this exercise, because the thought that immediately came to mind were the myriad of disappointments and the many “what if only” moments that have frequently peppered my thoughts. The thought of putting pen to paper and documenting such times and sharing them with a class wasn’t appealing to me. I had always kept such thoughts to myself, fearing that the discovery of them would reveal me as a fraud, a failure.

After several weeks of procrastination, I pulled out some poster board, markers and a ruler and begin creating a timeline, breaking each board into increments of 7 years, marking significant dates such as graduating college, getting my first job, my first publications, beginning a podcast and leaving a good job to begin life as a freelancer. Accompanying those events, were moments in my personal life including my parents divorce, my own marriage and the purchase of my first home.

I placed green dots on the moments that provided me the most joy and yellow dots for those times of deepest frustration and despair. I linked these with a drawn red line, which created a visual graph of the ups and downs of my emotional life.

I was surprised by what I saw in front of me. On the page, I saw what I had managed to accomplish in my life, especially in the last few years, which included writing two books and managing to remain self-employed after five years. Despite the fact that I had been rife with self-doubt and insecurity, I had nevertheless managed to accomplish some wonderful things. I had created opportunities for myself that were challenging and exhilarating.

Yet, I hadn’t been seeing it. I realized that I had been fixated on those things I hadn’t done. I was lamenting where I thought I should have been rather than appreciating where I was. I was so busy comparing my insides to other people’s outsides that I couldn’t see the forest for the trees.

When I looked at the moments that brought my greatest levels of happiness and satisfaction, they were always moments when I felt challenged. During such times, life wasn’t about the dull, predictable routine. It was about facing the unknown and unpredictable and discovering what I was truly able to achieve and accomplish. More often than not, I surprised myself by what I could achieve with the experience and skills that I already had.

Luck and good timing inspired some of these accomplishments. Others happened from thoughtful planning and dutiful footwork. Then there were those choices that were made when the thought of continuing to say no to myself was both unacceptable and unbearable.

The times when I felt most depressed where during times when I was overextending a welcome, with a relationship or a job. Though each job had proven challenging and satisfying, there eventually came a time when I wanted something more and the reality was it wasn’t likely to happen if I stayed put. Yet, I would delay making a change, seduced by the perceived security of a bi-weekly paycheck and benefits. I could just continue to fantasize about an imagined life.  That wouldn’t cost me anything. So, I thought.

But the longer I stayed in that comfortable setting, the more uncomfortable I became, the more dissatisfied I felt.

Yet, when I would think of making a change, the question of whether I was good enough, prepared enough to make such a decision would arise. And the more I said no to myself, the more miserable I became.

When I looked at my life on paper, I saw that during those moments when I felt most fulfilled and happy, I was never completely ready to make a change. I hadn’t done some kind of personal inventory and declared myself complete vetted and certified. I just decided it was time to do it and I just did it. I leapt into a world where the only certainty was uncertainty.

And when I faced the inevitable problems or crisis, I would figure them out and keep moving. Even when failure seemed imminent, I kept moving. Even when I felt like everything was ready to fall apart, I put one foot in front of another and did the next thing that needed doing: putting the next word on the page, picking up the phone and making that call, saying yes when everything inside me was telling me to say no and crawl back under a rock.

Those terrible feelings didn’t disappear. They were still there, feeling as real as anything, but they were no longer standing in my way.

I wish I could say that every day, I have this clarity of thinking. I don’t. There are days when the feelings get the better of me and I’m a worthless mess. Then there are the other days, when I quiet those voices enough to get the next thing done and I make progress and good things begin to happen as a result. They might not happen on my timetable, but they eventually do happen.

The answer to the questions of whether I’m good enough or whether I’m ready enough have never gotten answered when relegated to the confines of my own mind. The answer only comes when I have made the choice to do something different, to take the risk and face the possibility of personal and sometimes, public failure. The answer manifests itself not in words, but in the work or project or challenge I make the choice to take on.

Some of these things turned out better than others. I achieved tremendous successes and have experienced some embarrassing failures. There were times when I received warming praise and other moments when I was subject to withering criticism.

But in the end of each effort, I have always felt the satisfaction of knowing that I made a choice that affirmed what is good about me and the talents that I have been blessed with.

Today, I’m good enough to get the things done that need to get done. What happens after that is often out of my hands, but if the past is any indication, there are good thing ahead for me, whether I feel I’m ready for them or not.

Ibarionex Perello is a photographer, writer, educator and host of the popular interview show, The Candid Frame. He is the author of Chasing the Light: Improving Your Photography Using Available Light.