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  • Category Archives Guest Blogger

    New Adventures in Photography

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    Photo by Corey Rich

    In 2000 I was a software developer living in Tucson, Arizona. I had been rock climbing for seven years, and taking pictures of my adventures. I was totally psyched on Galen Rowell’s Art of Adventure Photography. I too wanted to share my passion for the great outdoors – not just how it looked, but how I felt about it and how I thought about it. Simple ideas like this make a young person reckless. I quit my job to “go pro.” This was a hilarious idea by the way – I didn’t actually stop doing software work on the side for another six years.

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    On the Sharp End. Self portrait from the Whetstone Mountains in Arizona.

    My first publication was a 2-page spread in Outside Magazine. Climbing in the remote Whetstone Mountains of Southern Arizona, I made a photograph of my hand reaching out into a cave from 40 feet up, clipping my lead rope to the next protection point, depicting the first-person view of what it’s like “on the sharp end” of the lead-rope.

    I was hanging from a rope to get this shot of course, not actually climbing. After climbing the line once before, I thought about the idea for a photograph. I went back up with the camera (a Nikon F100) and spent some time getting myself in position for the shot. I contorted myself Superman-style to hold the rope with one hand, shoot with the other, and keep my feet and gear out of the frame. That’s the way a lot of my “adventures” actually went. Out playing somewhere, I would get an idea, marinate on it for a while, and then come back later to create a photograph.

    .....I was introduced to when he and I both wound up being the featured photographers in the same issue of Nikon World magazine, it's Atlanta-based editorial and commercial photographer, Andrew Kornylak. He's got some amazing images---and before you read his post tomorrow, make sure you check out his Action photography portfolio at his Web site (click here). Make sure you check back tomorrow to see what Andrew has in store for us. :)

    Photographers Using Video on the Web

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    I’m a still photographer. I have spent roughly 25 years studying lighting techniques, obsessing over the best equipment, perfecting my darkroom prowess, and then starting over with Photoshop. Video is a very different animal; one that intimidates and frightens me. Recognizing what I’m good at and leaving the rest alone has gotten me this far; why do I need to consider utilizing video at this stage of the game? Because the web is here to stay and the competition is heating up.

    My background in photography and interest in leveraging the latest technology to advance image making, led to my involvement with liveBooks, the industry’s leading provider of professional-level websites. Over the course of the last five years, I have seen an evolution in the way photographers are using the web to market themselves. One substantial change has involved the inclusion of video in some very interesting and resourceful ways.

    What I will focus on here is not photographers offering video as a service to their clients, which is certainly happening as well, but more specifically how still photographers are using video on the web to market themselves.

    ....someone from inside the photography industry itself; the co-founder of liveBooks, photographer Matt Bailey. Now, this is probably the first time I've had an industry vendor as a guest blogger, but I was contacted by a reader of this blog who suggested having Matt as a guest, and in particular to have him talk about a subject he's very passionate about, which is how photographers can incorporate video into their photography website. I thought, since video is the next emerging must-include feature in new dSLRs, this might be a perfect topic (here are three photographers' websites which have incorporated video with their photography): Colin Finlay (link) Gene Higa (link) Christopher Griffith (link) Anyway, I think it will be really cool, so check back here tomorrow to see what Matt has to say about this fascinating new era in photography and the Web.

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    Images courtesy of: The Ant Farm, Trailer Park Print, Crew Creative Advertising

    “If I am to speak for ten minutes, I need a week for preparation; if fifteen minutes, three days; if half an hour, two days; if an hour, I am ready now.”
    – Woodrow T. Wilson

    I think that I know what Wilson had in mind back then. Deadlines, deadlines, deadlines… My constant source of inspiration. :)

    Hi Scott and fellow bloggers-photoshopers… what a pleasure to be here!

    Since a topic of this blog was wide open, I had a reaaaaalllyyy hard time deciding what to talk about. It’s due tomorrow, so I better focus now… 3… 2… 1… focus. Opasinski, focusss…

    I would love to share some reflections with you guys, not fully Photoshop oriented, but associated to a certain degree by Photoshop existence.

    Long story short… or short story long, we’ll see… :)

    ....Hollywood Movie Poster designer, and Photoshop genius designer, Tom Opasinski. I first learned about Tom back when he was still living in Poland. He was a NAPP member and had been in touch with my brother Jeff (who used to be NAPP's Executive Director before he retired a few years back). Jeff showed me some of his work back then and I was wow'd. He had always told Jeff how he dreamed that one day he could come to a Photoshop World conference. Well, one day came, he did, and Tom walked away with a Guru Award to boot. The next time I heard about Tom he had moved to Los Angeles, and a little while later I heard he was designing Hollywood movie posters. Not bad, eh? Well, tomorrow I have to honor of sharing Tom's work with you, and I'm just tickled…

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