Category Archives Lightroom



Wow—what a great day yesterday in LA! The crowd was absolutely awesome, and we just had such a blast!!! (photos above by Matt Kloskowski)

Tom Hogarty, Adobe’s Lightroom Product Manager, flew in for the day to help field questions from the nearly 700 photographers on hand, along with my buddy Matt Kloskowski, and between the three of us, we were swamped all day.

Also on hand was our recent guest blogger, concert photographer Alan Hess, who posted some very cool shots from the day (including a slick pano of the meeting hall) over at his blog (here’s the link).

Matt is picking up the tour next year with his first tour stop being Covington, Kentucky on January 23rd. If you want to sign up, here’s the link for all the details.

Thanks to everyone in LA for being so much fun. I really got to meet some great people yesterday, and everybody made me feel right at home. Can’t wait to see you all again!


I hope you’ll be in the crowd this Thursday at the Los Angeles Convention Center as I wrap up my final Lightroom 2 Tour date for the year, on December 4, 2008.

As I mentioned earlier on the blog; my buddy Matt Kloskowski will be there helping me field questions during the day, and Mike “Hollywood” Kubeisy will be there assisting me with my live shoots (I left Brad back at the office because he’s wanted on a outstanding warrant in LA. Hey, don’t laugh—he could have warrants. That’s why they call him).

Anyway, we’re going to have a great day, and if you want to snag one of the remaining seats (we’re going to have around 700 photographers there that day), here’s the link. Hope I’ll be seeing you there!


As promised, here’s a breakdown of a new Lightroom 2 workflow I tried out during my vacation trip to Turkey, Greece, and Egypt.

When I’m on vacation, I take two types of shots:

  1. Regular travel photos, where we’re posed in front of a monument, and I shoot the quaint restaurant we ate at, and all the standard tourist stuff that chronicles your vacation, and would make a great travel slideshow to show friends back home.
  2. Shots that just appeal to me as a photographer, which don’t always show a place like most people would expect. For example, I could shoot for a week in Paris and not have a single shot of the Eiffel tower; an act which would make most wives bludgeon their husbands upon return from their trip.

I always make a printed photo book of each trip when I return (once you start making printed photo books—you’ll always want one for each trip), but since I knew I would be shooting a lot of arty travel shots as well (my wife’s term) travel shots, I wanted to make a second book of just that stuff (which is the layout you saw here on the blog last week). So, I’m making two different books, which is what got me wanting to try a slightly different workflow.

DISCLAIMER: Just so you know; I tried out something new here, so there will be things in this workflow that are very different from my standard workflow which is detailed in my Lightroom 2 book. You know that up front, so you’re not allowed to post any comments that include the phrase, “…but in your book you said to…..”


Step One: Creating a New Catalog
I figured I’d start fresh by creating a new empty Lightroom catalog on my laptop, especially since I was going merge this catalog with my main Lightroom catalog (on my main photo workstation) when I got home. So, in Lightroom I went under the File menu and choose New Catalog. I named it “Turkey Greece Egypt” and up came a completely empty new Lightroom window.


Step Two: Creating My Initial Collection Sets
I knew which cities and countries I’d be visiting, so I created a Collection Set (kind of like a folder of collections) right up front for each city and country (you create Collection Sets by clicking on the little plus (+) sign at the top right corner of the Collections panel, then choose Collection Set from the pop-up menu).

Step Three: Importing and Sorting
At the end of each day, I would come back to the room and download my photos onto Two OWC On-The-Go drives (they’re 160GB each). One set goes on a drive named “Main Drive” and I have Lightroom automatically back-up a 2nd set to a drive named “Back-up Drive.” So, our first stop was Istanbul, so I imported the first days photos, and quickly went through and flagged any photos as “Rejects” that were just too awful to store on the drive.


Then, I quickly went through and made collections sorted by where the photos were taken that day (as seen above). This step isn’t entirely necessary, but I just like to be able to click and jump right to particular set of photos from an area, so I usually organize my days like this.

Now, my wife and I sat down in front of Lightroom; I double-clicked on the first photo to (more…)


If you’re going to PPE (Photo Plus Expo) in New York City this week, I want to invite you to stop by some training sessions I’m doing on the expo floor. Here’s the schedule for my classes and demos:


  1. 1:00 pm at the Adobe Booth: “Lightroom and Photoshop CS4 Killer Tips”
  2. 3:00 pm at the Peachpit Press Booth: “Professional Portrait Retouching Techniques”
  3. 4:30 pm at the Westcott Booth: “Portrait Lighting Using The Spiderlite TD-5s”


  1. 11:00 am at the Adobe Booth: “Lightroom and Photoshop CS4 Killer Tips”

If you’re at the show, I hope you’ll catch one of my sessions, and if you do, make sure you come up and say “hi.” Hope I’ll see you there!


This is going to sound far from revolutionary, but I tried something a little different in my new Lightroom 2 book; we “bolded” all the keyboard shortcuts to make it easier for them to stand out if you’re searching for them later on.

I got the idea from an attendee to my previous Lightroom Live Tour; in their evaluation form they noted that if they have to go back to their workbook to find a particular shortcut, it would make it easier if they were bolded, so in their search they could skip over paragraphs (or entire pages) without bolded shortcuts. Plus, they thought it would just be helpful, and more eye-catching in general.

So, the reason why I’m bringing this up now is; I haven’t heard any feedback one way or another on this particular aspect of the book. Maybe nobody noticed; maybe everybody thought they were always bold. Is it distracting, or helpful?

Anyway, if you have the book, take a quick look and let you know if this is a step in the right direction or not. I made a screen capture of a page (above), and you can see a larger version by clicking on it, but honestly, it’s kinda hard to see here, so it’s really better if you look in your copy of the book. I’m really interested to hear your feedback for future books, and workbooks (which is what I’ve been working on for days, preparing for my Lightroom 2 Tour, kicking off in just a few weeks. Yikes!). Thanks in advance for your help.

Note: I’ve been getting emails from people who led PhotoWalks around the world who have received their copy of the book. I heard from Glasgow and Paris in just the past few days. I’m lovin’ it! :)

I’ve been seeing a lot of comments on the blog this week that I wanted to address, but when I was talking about it to my buddy Matt Kloskowski (who’s getting similar comments on his blog), he suggested that we do a short video, rather than writing the 5,000 words it would take to address both the “Lightroom 2 vs. CS4” and my and Matt’s carefully orchestrated coverup of the problems some people have been having with Lightroom 2, so to round out this week, here’s a video clip, created exclusively for you guys, on both of these topics. View the video

Scott & Matt on Lightroom 2