Category Archives Misc

Spam in mailbox

Hi Gang: Earlier this week I saw some comments that you’re posting comments but they’re not getting through. I don’t moderate my comments—-if you write them, they go live immediately, unless my blog’s built-in Spam filter thinks it’s spam.

It will usually mark it as spam if you include more than one link in your comment, or if you use the word Viagra. ;-)

Anyway, for some reason, it’s been blocking all sorts of comments in the past week, so I went back through all the thousands of spam comments I get in a week (over 240 pages worth), and I found a bunch of comments that you guys posted but got marked as spam.

First, I’m so sorry they were delayed, and we’re checking on the problem, and how to fix it.

Secondly, thanks to everyone who commented. There were lots of great comments, and I appreciate it very much. By the way: I read each and every comment you post, and occassionally respond back in the post, or in some cases, I just email you back directly (depending on my schedule, so I don’t get to answer nearly as many as I’d like), but either way—I read every single one.

Thanks for your patience while we get this spam comment thing worked out, but I’ll be keeping an eye out several times a day in case a legitimate comment gets tossed in the Spam Can. :)

All my best,

-Scott

LR3Tour

Hey gang, Brad here filling in for Scott again.  He’s down in Ft. Lauderdale today, kicking off the new and improved Lightroom LIVE Tour, so he wanted me to let you know that today is “No-Blog Monday” since he’s been busy prepping for that.

But… I did want to share something with you that I got from last week’s guest blogger, John Wright. He was so thankful for the response his blog got that he emailed me to say this…

“For what it’s worth I’d like to send a really heartfelt ‘thank you’ to all your readers who responded so generously and positively to my post. The reach of Scott’s blog is vast and to think that my words may have resonated so positively with so many photographers and readers is incredible. To hear of people who are about to shoot jobs like John S, about to shoot his first wedding in 30 years, and to know that what was a simple, though genuine, stream of consciousness may help him approach what could be a daunting project, with a little more confidence, is not only flattering but kinda humbling. A very real ‘thank you’ to everyone who read my words and to those with whom they resonated, I’m SO glad they did! :)”

So, that’s it for today.  If you happened to miss Friday’s blog on “The Shot,” or even if you caught it early in the day, go back and give it a read then browse through the comments.  There were some pretty killer shots in there from some of you, so it’s worth a quick look back!  Thanks again to all of you who chimed in on the discussion and shared your best-so-far images!

memday3

Today is Memorial Day in the United States, and our offices are closed as we honor and remember those who gave their lives in service to our country.

This post is also dedicated each year to the memory of David Leimbach, (brother of our own Jeff Leimbach), who died two years ago in combat in Afghanistan.

Just a humble word of thanks to the dedicated men and women of our armed services and to all those who came before them who laid down their lives to protect the freedoms we enjoy each day.

All we have of freedom, all we use or know –
This our fathers bought for us long and long ago.
~Rudyard Kipling, The Old Issue, 1899

flash_notdead
by RC Concepcion

Hey everyone – I figured while we were in the guest blog mood with no guest blog, I’d fill in and talk a little bit about something that seems to be a hot topic as of late – Flash on mobile devices. In what seems to be an open debate – Conan vs. Leno Style – the arguments have spilled out into the open as to whether the Flash technology will die because of its inability to be on smart phones. This argument reached fever pitch when Steve Jobs himself wrote an open letter – defending the decision not to run Flash on their devices.

Now, I personally disagreed with the open letter and posted my own rant about it on my personal blog arguing point by point why I thought Mr. Jobs was looking at it the wrong way. That said- I still don’t think that the iPod/iPad should be forced to have Flash installed on them. I’d like it.. It’d be nice… It’d be even better with an on/off switch.. but it’s ultimately Apple’s call – and you have to respect that. At its core, I just took issue with -how- the argument was presented and how I felt like the choice was limiting – but consumers should ultimately decide with their wallets.

This would beg the question as to whether Flash “is Dead” (as it’s clamored on the net these days). I’d say – don’t count them out yet. Here’s a few reasons why. Come on.. you know you’re curious.. :)

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BradBeach

(I’m going to go ahead and apologize up front… There aren’t many, well, any, images in this post to help break up the text [I know, I should’ve had my camera with me the whole time!], but I’ve done my best to break the text up into smaller chunks to make it easier to get through. Hope it’s worth the read!)

How did I get to where I am today?

That’s a question that I get asked somewhat often when people meet me, so I figured I would share it here. That way, if we do meet some day, you’ll already know and we can talk about something besides me :)

I was born at a young age in the hills of East Tennessee…

Actually, let’s fast forward to the part where I pick up a camera, cool? Thought so.

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graphic

For quite a few years now at my live seminars I’ve been saying that one of the challenges with learning new techniques in Photoshop is that we are creatures of habit. We tend to do things the way we always have, because, well, we just do.

In an effort to figure out how to our Photoshop habits are formed I went looking for more information on habits, and found the following (interestingly enough on a blog by Ian Newby-Clark called “Creatures of Habit”).

“As creatures, we have needs. We need to eat, and so we eat. As rather intelligent and social creatures, we like to chat with one another, and so we do. We take turns and finish our conversations gracefully. And there are dozens and dozens more behaviors that are just as complicated, if not more so. How on Earth do we get all of this done?

That’s where habits come in. Habits help us through our day. When we are doing something that is habitual, we are not engaged in the task in the same way as when we are doing something that is not habitual. Just as an example, consider making breakfast in your own kitchen on any given weekday. Next time you do it, watch how effortlessly it happens. It’s not exactly like an out-of-body experience, but it’s close. Your movements through the kitchen are stereotyped. You grab the milk out of the fridge, turn toward the counter and give the door that little nudge you with your foot that you know it needs. If something is on your mind, you might not notice that you’re sitting at the table and munching on your second piece of toast until you’re halfway through it. Now, compare that to getting breakfast at a friend’s house. Maybe you’re dog sitting (you’re so nice!) Where’s the milk? The bread? Oh my goodness, so complicated!”

So true, right? At home we do things almost unconsciously, to some degree “going through the motions”.

I think for many of us, working in Photoshop (or that other program that starts with L) is the same. We open a photo and immediately go into our habitual methods of cloning, brightening, fixing or editing. Unfortunately, sometimes that may mean that we are missing out on methods that are faster, easier, more accurate or more flexible because these “new” techniques involve change.

Here’s an example: for years I’ve been preaching the non-destructive workflow idea, using layers and making merged copies rather than flattening. I would keep my layers and then press Command-Option-Shift E (PC: Ctrl-Alt-Shift-E) to make a merged copy, giving me the equivalent of a flattened layer but with all the layers below. Problem is, if you need to make any changes to the underlying layers you have to delete the merged layer and make a new one once you’ve made that changed. It works fine, and it’s definitely better that flattening.

So that’s been a habit of mine. Almost happens without thinking sometimes.

Then the other day it struck me that it would be much easier better faster more efficient to use a Smart Object. (In case you’ve been hiding under a rock – or Photoshop 7 – Smart Objects have been around the last few versions of Photoshop). So I tried taking multiple layers and making them into a Smart Object before continuing to edit. (Insert Angels singing sound here). Wow! So much simpler, and yet it took me a while (and some effort) to break my old habit and try this.

(Here’s a tutorial I recorded for the NAPP site, complete with one of my traditional goofy endings)

So the point is, where the pressure’s on to get something done, we tend to go with the tried-and-true ways: our habits. And while there’s nothing wrong with that, I encourage you – neigh, I challenge you – to try some of the new features of Photoshop (or even existing tools and techniques that you’ve never tried). Maybe you’ll find some great timesavers that will become part of your new work habits…until the next version of Photoshop comes along. Then maybe it’ll be time to break those habits and develop some new ones.

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