Category Archives Misc


Earlier this year I was lucky enough to get a media pass to shoot Tiger Woods during the Tavistock Cup golf tournament, and after I posted some of the shots from the day here on my blog, a friend asked if I might send him a couple of prints of his favorite shots from the bunch. I used to send him two framed prints, and I’m honored that they’ve been hanging on the wall of his office ever since.

Yesterday I got an email from him, and the subject Line read: “Moral Dilemma.” He said he found Tiger’s recent actions dishonorable to his wife and family, and he was so disappointed in him, and had lost such respect for Tiger’s moral judgment, that he had taken the framed prints off his walls, and he wanted to know if  I wanted them returned or donated to charity.

Later that same day, I got another email with a similar subject line, but it was from one of my blog readers, asking how I could keep a photo of Tiger in my portfolio (it’s not the one shown above, though it was taken the same day). Then I got another email asking the same thing—-when would I be removing Tiger’s image from my portfolio. I could see a pattern developing.

Last night I called my friend to let him know I was as disappointed in Tiger as he was. We both looked up to Tiger not just as an incredible athlete, but as a role model—-a devoted husband, a sharp businessman, and a family man—a guy that had it all, yet still had it all together, but now we feel much differently. But I asked him to reconsider taking the framed prints down—not because they were photos I had taken, but for something bigger; an act of Forgiveness.

Tiger admitted his mistakes publicly, and took full responsibility for them. He admitted that what he did was wrong, and besides, this is between Tiger and his family. Even so, his entire life—his entire career—will forever be tainted, and impacted, by his transgressions. It will cost him sponsors, fans, and will cause him untold public humiliation for years to come. Now, if Tiger had come out and said, “Hey, it’s no big deal—everybody does it” that’s a different story entirely. In fact, if Tiger had in any way tried to justify what he had done, or downplayed it in any way, he’d be all alone on this one, but he did something most folks in his situation would never do—admit his mistake, publicly apologize, and recommit himself to his wife and family.

Tiger made a monumental mistake, but we all know people in our own lives, (friends, co-workers, perhaps even family members) that have not only done similar things, but in some cases much worse, and I can only hope their private and most humiliating mistakes aren’t paraded around to the entire world like Tiger’s have been. This is another case where people are all too happy to line up and sling arrows at a privileged person. Outside his celebrity, Tiger Woods is a real person, as are his wife and children. They are all real people dealing with a painful situation.

When I look at my Tiger Woods photos, I may never feel the same way I did about the man in the photos, but I won’t be taking them down. I forgive him, too. I’m also not deleting my photos of A-Rod that I took when I shot the New York Yankees, and if I had shots of President Clinton, I wouldn’t remove them either. I’m glad I’m not a celebrity photographer, or I’m not sure I’d be able to display any photos at all. However, I am happy to report that my friend had a change of heart as well and he’s re-hanging those images in his office today.

There is no shortage of people taking shots at, and severely judging Tiger Woods today, and I’m not saying he doesn’t have it coming, but if there’s one thing my Faith has taught me is that when a family is in trouble, we pray for them, and that’s exactly what I am going to do.


Good Friday morning everyone!  Brad here, filling in for Scott today.

As I was driving into work, I got a call from Scott telling me how much he was looking forward to his Lightroom seminar in Livonia today, and how smoothly everything was running.  While we were talking, I asked, “By the way, was today’s no blog Friday intentional?”

“Oh no! I forgot!!  Can you put up a post letting everyone know what happened?  I just got so wrapped up in prepping for today’s seminar that it slipped my mind!”

So there you have it… The thrilling story of how today became “No. Blog. FRIDAY.”

Speaking of Lightroom, Rob Sylvan (who happens to be one of our Photoshop World moderators) has a great post up over on the Photo Focus blog called “10 Things I Wish I Could Tell Every New Lightroom User.”  Swing by there and check that out as it’s full of great tips for new users, and reminders for experienced users.

That’s it for today!  Have a great weekend!


I’m not talking about “metallic prints” (which are prints made on Kodak metallic-finish paper) I’m talking about images actually printed on metal (well, Aluminum to be exact). I got two different kinds in the past two weeks, from two different sources, so I’m going to cover them both here.

First, the print I’m holding above, which is from Image Wizards, and it’s one of their “AluminArte” images (which they call, “High Definition Images on Aluminum”).

On their site (link) they make a pretty bold statement:

“Remember the first time you saw HDTV? Our AluminArte samples will show you a level of imaging never seen before.”

I have to admit—it’s actually right on the money. My buddy Matt Kloskowski had the first AluminArte print I’d ever seen (it was of his amazing landscape shot of a barn in Washington State’s Polouse region), and when it came in the office, we all just stood around it slack-jawed. I’d never seen anything like it. Then when mine print came in (shown above), we all did the same thing—the depth and detail is like what you see on HDTV (compared to regular broadcast).

The sad thing is—-in a regular photo of it (like you see above—photo by Brad Moore), you lose all that depth and dimension that you see so clearly in person (just imagine seeing a HDTV image on a regular TV with no HD and you know what I mean). I found a video on their site, about the process, but again, because it’s video, it can’t show the depth of this type of printing on any level (this is just one of those “you have to see it with your own eyes” type of things).

Anyway, I’m incredibly impressed, and I’m going to have some of my favorite images reprinted as AluminArte images when I get back from Photoshop World. Here’s the link to their site.

Now, onto the 2nd type of metallic printed image:


This one is actually a six-piece mural (made up of six 12″x12″ metallic tiles) from Metal Murals and although theirs isn’t the Hi-Def type of images that I got from Image Wizards, the impact here comes from the size and presentation.

The funny thing is; these two types of images had a different impact on different groups of people. The photographers in my office lost their minds over the quality of the Hi-Def  image (shown above), but everybody (the non-serious photo crowd) were all taken in by the mural. Everybody was talking about it when it came in (and a bunch of golfers in the office wanted to snag it for their office).

The pole they’re connected to (shown here, with the help of Brad Moore—photo by Matt Kloskowski), are also how you mount them to your wall (it came with the mounts, and it’s pretty darn clever how the whole thing works).

Also, you can buy a much smaller 12″x12″ sample version (the size of just one tile) if you want to make a proof for your client before creating the final full-sized mural. Since the mural will have gaps, I think this is really a smart idea—especially if you’re creating a really large mural (these murals can be any size, and not just made up of 12″x12″ squares, and you can have more than just six squares).

They’ve got a page of samples on their site (link) and from their sample page, these must be very popular for tradeshow displays (or it just includes a lot of photos from their own tradeshow booth—I couldn’t tell). Here’s the link to Metal Murals Website.

Anyway, despite the fact that the ‘metallic-ness’ of both types of printing get totally lost when you show a regular photo of them (like you see here), when you see them in person—-either one—-you’ll be amazed at how much impact they have.


So, a couple of months ago, I was shooting an event and one of the other photographers there told me about a local Photoshop expert (whom I know) who was mad at me because he sent me a friend request on Facebook, and I didn’t friend him, so he felt snubbed. Just what I needed—-another reason for people to be mad at me. ;-)

I let her know that it wasn’t intentional (I honestly never saw his friend request—you’ll see why in a moment), and I told her that I don’t really stay up with my Facebook page at all. In fact, I don’t think I’ve posted there in months—-if I do anything, it’s just to comment on something one of my friends have posted (with all the stuff I do online, I like to keep my Facebook page for just my family and personal friends).

Anyway, I felt bad that he felt slighted, so that night I went back and looked at my pending friend requests, and at that point I had over 1,000 pending friend requests. (Though after some searching, I did find his request and I “friended him”).

So, with all these requests stacking up (and the hurt feeling building up) Brad and I started sending a Facebook direct message out to these pending people to let them know that my Facebook page is really just for my personal friends (and leading them to our public NAPP Facebook page instead), and we were sending out about 30 of these emails a day to get the pending number down to something more manageable.

But then Facebook themselves sent me a warning saying they thought I was spamming people, and they were going to close my account altogether, so after making some decent progress in whittling the number way down (everybody was very kind about it and totally understood), we had to stop doing that, too.

Well, I just checked my Facebook page today and now it’s back up to nearly 1,200 pending requests, so the number of people who are mad at me, (not including sports photographers), is growing.

The reason I’m telling you this is; this week I got an email from a reader asking why I hadn’t approved their Friend request, and that they were kind of hurt, and then they gave me a list of reasons why I should reconsider. Now I feel really bad (and I don’t even know him, but the guilt is racking up now).

So, I guess I just wanted to let everybody whose feelings I might have hurt by not accepting their friend request that (1) I’m really sorry, and (2) it’s totally nothing personal—–I’m just trying to keep my Facebook page just for friends and family (people I would include in my Verizon Friends & Family plan if only the iPhone was on Verizon, which one can only hope will happen someday soon).

Now, that being said, we do now have a NAPP Facebook page and group. These are the pages that all us “Photoshop Guys” use to connect with fellow NAPP members and PhotoshopUser TV viewers and blog readers (and I’m going to try and post some there myself), so I hope you will join us there! (and yes—we will accept your friend request there for sure!).

Anyway, thanks for understanding, and here’s the link.


When I go on the road for seminars or photo shoots, I generally try to stay at Hilton Garden Inns (which is a less expensive boutique hotel chain run by Hilton). They’re all pretty new, so the hotels are nice and clean (that’s very important to me), and you get free breakfast, and free wireless, and they have a little 24-hour store where you can get toiletries, and snacks and stuff, and for the money, they’re really hard to beat.

At least I thought that until I stayed at a Hyatt Place the night before my Orlando Photoshop Down & Dirty seminar. That’s where I want to stay from now on.

Like the Hilton Garden Inn, the Hyatt Place is Hyatt’s lower priced boutique chain, but where the Garden Inn is kind of simple and homey, the Hyatt Place has a much more creative bent to it (it’s kind of like the “jetBlue” of hotels, and I totally mean that as a compliment).

For example, the layout of the hotel is very hip. It looks like something you’d see in New York or San Francisco costing lots more. They had a small Starbucks attached to the front desk, and it was open 24 hours (since it’s manned by the front desk staff late at night), and when you order a sandwich (even late at night), they serve it on a real plate—-heated if you like—and they served the whole thing up like you were in a restaurant, even though you take it back to your room.

My room was great. It really wasn’t much bigger than a standard sized room (see the image up top—courtesy of Hyatt Place, which totally doesn’t do the room justice), but the layout was really brilliant (it was like a Think Tank Photo bag. The same size, but somehow they made it feel much bigger).

Totally digging my suite-like room
They made the room seem like a suite, with a vertical half-wall separating the bedroom from the rest (but much nicer than an Embassy Suites room) with really cool furniture, which included a wall-mounted 45″ High-Def flat panel television. The TV was set up so you could plug anything (including HDMI) right into it; your iPod, your digital camera, your computer—-you name it. You could do a slide presentation right in your room.

It had a refrigerator, a wet bar, a work desk, a great roomy shower, lots of places to sit (it kind of had a big sectional so you could put your feet up, work, and watch TV). Plus, it was super clean.

It came with free Wireless everywhere, and the whole room was just set up very smartly, and it actually reminded me of a room at the “W” hotel, but it was roomier and at just a fraction of the cost. Also, the staff was really on the ball and went out of their to help me on several occasions.

You get free breakfast. They had a cool-looking restaurant downstairs, where you got your free breakfast, but I skipped it that morning to get over to the convention center early.

Price Matters
I did some checking to compare prices between the Hilton Garden Inn and the Hyatt Place, and they’re priced very comparably (in some cases, one was $10 to $12 bucks higher than the other, but it just depended on the city as to which one was a little higher than the other).

Anyway, I know this isn’t generally the kind of thing I blog about here, but you know when I learn about something really great, I can’t keep it to myself. I know a lot of you travel (and I know a lot of you travel to my seminars), and if you’re going to a city that has a Hyatt Place, you should give it a try—–if you’re a creative type (which if you read this blog, you are), you’ll totally dig it. (Here’s a link to their Website).

By the way, if you come to Tampa for my Lightroom seminar in November, they just opened one right by the airport (about 10 to 12 minutes from the convention center).