Category Archives Photography

Above: iPhone shot of Bruno Mars in concert.

Whew!!! What a busy travel week. On Saturday I snuck the wifey off to Vegas to see Bruno Mars in concert at the Chelsea in the Cosmopolitan Hotel (it was a surprise birthday present — her birthday was a few weeks ago), and we had an absolute blast! Bruno Mars’ show was just absolutely outstanding — one of the best concerts either of us had ever seen. Everything from the sound to the lights to the stage show was just spot on. What a talented guy!

Anyway, here’s what’s up:

Adobe Releases “Aperture to Lightroom Migration Guide”
They actually did this a few weeks ago, but I run into lots of folks who hadn’t heard it had been released. You can download the free guide (called “”Making the Switch from Aperture to Adobe Photoshop Lightroom”), in PDF format, right here. 


Heads up to Canon Pro Shooters
This past week Canon launched a brand new Twitter page for pro Canon shooters here in the United States. You can follow them right here: @canonusapro

Worldwide Photo Walk Update:
We’re up to over 675 walks so far in cities all around the world, and we’re almost to 6,000 photo walkers! (Whoo hoo!). My thanks to everybody who has donated $1 to the orphanage (much love!). New cities include: Ludwigshafen, Germany; Bronx, NY, USA; Springfield, IL, USA; Embu das Artes, Brasil; Oviedo, Spain; Worcester, Worcester UK; Szeged, Hungary; and Auckland, New Zealand. Come join the walk near you: (link).

I’m in St. Louis today â” Kansas City on Thursday!
I’m teaching my full-day seminar here in St. Louis today, and on Thursday in Kansas City. Looking forward to meeting a whole bunch of you in person. 

Photoshop World is just one week away!
It’s not to late to register and join us for the full conference in Las Vegas. Here’s the link. Also, if you can’t make the full conference, but want a free pass to the Expo floor, here’s the link for a free expo-only pass. Lots of cool stuff to see!

OK, gang — that’s it for this Tuesdays. I hope if you’re here in St. Louis and you read my blog, you’ll come up and say ‘hi.” :)

All my best,


Greetings from the Airport (well, I’m already on the plane, so “greetings from the Tarmac — I’m on my way to New York to shoot the US Open Tennis Tournament, which kicks off today. But firstâ¦.I’m heading to London!!!

When: Friday, 10, October
Where: Conference Centre Westminster
Tickets: Only 99£ at
Earlybird Discount: Use the code Live10″ you save £10 — enough to buy me a pint.
Why: Because I love Swingin' London baby, yeah!

PLUS: If you sign up now, you get my “Light it, Shoot it, Retouch it” full tour (recorded live on location as it happened) as a digital download.

For more details, or to sign up (seating is limited), click right here: - If you're reading this from the UK, could you help us spread the word over there? Much appreciated.

Hope to meet you in person in London!



P.S. Tomorrow I’m teaching this seminar in St. Louis and on Thursday in Kansas City. If you want to come out and spend the day with me, it’s not too late: 


It’s called “Expose Yourself With Scott Kelby” (I didn’t name it. I would have named it “Get nudie-nude naked and naughty with DJ Scott-Scotty K and the fully clothed nudists” but they voted it down).

Anyway, if you are picked as the winner, you win a Sony RX-100 Camera, so if you can get past the whole thing of having nothing on, this is awesome.

The contest is for photographers who want to share what they’ve learned with other photographer through a blog post, article, photo submission, etc. on —-(in their words: “ is now a fully fledged photography magazine. In addition to featuring awesome photographers and their kit, we put a strong emphasis on including additional value - it could be a tip, a mini tutorial or general advice. Essentially, we're asking photographers to SHOW & TELL). “ 

Anyway, this month the folks at are letting me pick my “favorite submission from the 10 most popular posts submitted and published between 1st July and 31st August 2014” (so get to writing — you could win!).

Here’s a link with all the details — I wish you the best of luck — hope you win the camera, and maybe even some clothes (hey, it could happen). ;-)

Above: Here’s the final image. Click on it so you can see it larger (it makes it much more epic). 

Now, you’ll notice I didn’t see “the” recipe â” I said “a” recipe (because there are many), but this is one I use again and again, in lots of different situations, that’s surprisingly quick and easy to pull off. But first, a behind-the-scenes shot (below).

Above: Here’s a behind-the-scenes shot. My camera is down low on a Gitzo tripod with the legs splayed out wide about as far as they can go. I’m shooting tethered into the laptop you see beside me â” going straight into Lightroom. I think that’s Brad with some serious hip action way off to the left. Dang hippie.

There are three ingredients in this recipe:

(1) A super wide angle lens
The wider the better (here I’m using a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 wide angle zoom, and I’m at 16mm). If you’re shooting a full frame camera, this is one of those times where its full-frameness pays off because your wide angle lens are wider. If you’re shooting a crop sensor camera, a 24-70mm won’t get you wide enough, even at 24mm â” you’re going to need something wider, like a 10mm or a 12mm wide angle (but not a fisheye). Think “super wide.”

(2) You need to get down really low 
Really super low (like you see me above). I’m not quite comfortable with lying down to get the ‘epic’ look, so I’m using a tripod with the legs splayed way out, but this getting low part is incredibly important to creating the bigness of the shot. Once you’re down low, it’s really important to get the floor in front of you in the shot â” it’s key to the bigness of the look. Also, if you can include the ceiling and the floor in the same shot, it really takes it over the top.

(3) You need a great location
I know that kind of seems like it goes without saying, but if you try this technique and your shot doesn’t look “epic” you have to ask yourself if you’re shooting in a location that is really interesting. I was shooting yesterday on the front porch of a beautiful gothic church and I did this technique and it just looked great (but I actually just put the camera right on the floor â” tilted it up on my camera strap, and took a blind shot to start, and just tweaked the position a little. It looked great. Ya know why? It was the right technique WITH the right location.

So really, if you’re already shooting at a great location, it’s really just two steps.

Above: Here’s the flip side behind-the-scenes shot, but this was taken a few minutes before I realized I wasn’t getting low enough to make the shot look really epic, so after this was taken we took my laptop off my tripod stand, and I used that tripod. Off in the distance is my team (Hendricke doing make-up and Lexi doing hair, Brad and Julio and Lynn helping on the set and Kalebra doing all the art direction and styling). 

Anyway, next time you find yourself shooting in a great location, try going for the big ‘epic’ look by using these two steps: (1) Use a super-wide angle lens, and (2) get down really low, almost to the floor, and include lots of the floor, and ideally the roof, in the shot.

Hope you find this recipe helpful, and here’s wishing you an ‘epic’ weekend with lots of amazing locations. :)

All my best,


Oh man, it’s been a long time since last football season â” nearly seven months, but preseason has already started and next Friday I’m shooting my first Tampa Bay Buccaneers home game (I’m shooting the Bucs for Zuma Press again this season, and I’ll be picking up some other games when the Bucs are on the road).

Hoping to do some more fun things with remote cameras this seasons, but not sure I’ll be doing any on Saturday (but I will be scoping out a possible remote location for the regular season opener).

Anyway, I thought I’d share what was my first photo-post ever over on, which was a post on my favorite shots of 2013 (see below), and if you’ve got a sec (and you’re ready for some football), here’s the link. 

So, next Monday we’ll see my first shots of the season (Bucs vs Dolphins), and I’m sure I’ll probably be a bit rusty, but man will I have a big smile on my face at about an hour before kickoff on Saturday night when I walk through the tunnel out onto the field and start to sweat in that humid Florida heat. But I don’t care. Football is back!

Hope you guys have a non-humid, nicely air-conditioned ‘but football is back so I don’t care’ kinda day! :)



So what exactly is pruning?
Many of us have been posting our images online for years now. We started with a SmugMug account, a Squarespace portfolio, or a flickr account or 500px, or maybe even a custom portfolio site of our own, and we put up whatever our best images were at the time. Of course, over the years we’ve gotten better at photography and we’ve uploaded lots of newer, better images, right? In fact,  if you were to look back now at those images you posted five years ago, you’d probably cringe, right? (I know I would â” sadly I wouldn’t have to go back that far).

The problem is (and I was reminded of this vividly while doing some online research for a trip), that although our images are much better today than they were five years ago, there’s a good chance those cringe-worthy images are still alive and well on your portfolio page (or on Smugmug, or flickr or whatever). I ran across this so many times â” I’d find a photographer’s site or 500px page and his stuff was amazing, but on page two it wasâ¦wellâ¦less amazing. By page three it was stuff he had done a few years ago and those images were  just OK. Page four was even worse â” you could tell he posted these when he first started, and they’re not bad, but they’re not real good.

The first question: Why is there a page 4?
It’s probably because you really haven’t thought about it in a while, and now you only look at page one where all your “best stuff” is, but other people often dig deeper, and the deeper they dig, they less impressed they become. For example, when I would see the front page of a photographer’s gallery and think “Man, this guy is good!” by the time I got to their 2nd page, I’d start thinking⦓Wow, I guess he isn’t as good as I thought” and by page three I’ve lost all interest in this guy’s work because his stuff is getting worse and worse (and really, it’s just his earlier work, which just simply isn’t as good as his current work).

If your best work is on your first page (or first set of images), then what’s on your 2nd page? The shots that weren’t good enough to make the first page â” where you put your best work. So, page two is your second rate work, right? My question to you is: “Why would you show anybody your 2nd rate work?” If that’s the case, what’s on page 3? See where this is going? Prune it big time, and leave them wanting more.

Don’t use this the “age old” excuseâ¦
When I’ve talked one-on-one to photographers about this, the one persistent excuse I’ve heard is “I think potential clients would be interested to see how my work has progressed over time, and how much better I am today.” That only works for your mom. She’ll be proud of how far you’ve come. But a potential client is about to see some really cringe-worthy work from you â” why would you chance that? What do you have to gain by keeping cringne-worthy pictures still up online for everybody to see? We know the downside. Where’s the upside?

That’s why I’m proclaiming today as “Prune Your Port Friday”
Take a few minutes right now â” dig through your SmugMug account, your flickr account, squarespace, 500px â” you name it and delete any shots that make you cringe even just a little. If you’ve got galleries that are more than a page deep, it’s time to prune. If you have shots in there you know aren’t that good, but for some reason you can’t explain it but you “just like ’em” it’s time to prune (keep those on your computer. That way if you miss them, you can still look at them. Do this when you’re alone).

Those old shots aren’t helping â” they’re hurting â” and you’ll feel so much better after cleaning house a bit and leaving just your new stuff, your strong stuff, your best stuff out there for the world to see. This is who you are today as a photographer. This is what you’re capable of. This is what they can expect from you. This is the real you, now. Let them see the real you and what you can do. I’ll bet they’ll be impressed.

If you’ve got a lot of images, this might make a great weekend project, and man is that a perfect segue segueway for me to wish you an awesome weekend of pruning, and we’ll see you back here on Monday for a very important announcement (one that many of you have been waiting for, forâ¦ohâ¦about a year).