Category Archives Photography

Happy Friday, everybody! Today I’m going to share five very short trailers (each around a minute or less) for online classes you can watch this weekend over at KelbyOne.com, including three classes from me.

BTW: If you’re not already a KelbyOne member, you can watch all five of these classes (and all the rest for that matter), for $19.99 (the cost of a one-month membership). Well, truth be told, you could just sign up for a 10-day free trial membership and watch them all for free (but don’t tell ’em I told ya). ;-)

Here they are:

https://youtu.be/clkUtMJBsho

Above: Location Lighting
That’s my class on location lighting – shot in four difference places for four different types of shoots. I’m using the Elinchrom ELB-400 battery pack and flash, but as many people online have said, you don’t need that set-up to learn a lot from this class.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class

https://youtu.be/2XMCPvEtj04

Above: Shooting Fashion on Location with Frank Doorhof
This is an awesome class from Dutch fashion photographer Frank Doorhof, shot on location in Amsterdam, on how to shoot, pose, and work with models. Frank rocks!

Here’s the link to Frank’s full online class at KelbyOne

https://youtu.be/wh0vt4DKub4

Above: How to photograph and create fun Holiday Cards
In this brand-new class RC shows you how to make way cooler Christmas Cards this year by not only creating the images yourself (instead of using the Mall Santa), but using Photoshop to create something really clever, really unique, and something your friends will be talking about.

Here’s the link to the full online class on KelbyOne

https://youtu.be/YuGYmgc8WZ8

Above: How to design Holiday Cards in Adobe Illustrator (with Pete Collins)
I know I said it’s only 5-trailers, but this one kind of goes hand-in-hand with the previous one since these are Holiday-specific classes. Pete shows you how incredible easy it is to create really clever custom holiday cards in Adobe Illustrator (and if you’ve never used Illustrator, but you’re an Adobe Creative Cloud subscriber, this is your chance to start using it).

Here’s the link to the full online class at KelbyOne

 

https://youtu.be/5wHnAg3ocPM

Above: Location Lite: High end look – low cost budget
I called this class “Location Lite” because the goal was to make it look like we shot on locations, but we really did it on the cheap and indoors, keeeping our budget at $300 (including the hot shoe flash itself, the modifier, and even the background). I’m hearing from so many people who have fallen in love with this class – you’ll dig it.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class.

 

https://youtu.be/lFzD3xOG4iI

Above: Retouching Brides
If you’re a wedding photographer, this one’s definitely for you, but even if you just do portraits, you’ll pick up lots of Photoshop retouching techniques in this class that you can use in your portrait work.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class.

There ya have it – lots to watch this weekend, and hope you learn a lot. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Make sure you check out my portrait lighting “fix” tutorial today over on LighroomKillerTips.com – I show how to take a technique we normally use for Landscape photos and repurpose it for portraits (see below).

portrait3

 

Figure 1sm

Today we’re looking at a location shoot I did using nothing but natural light, but in this case we have to give Mother Nature a hand using an inexpensive trick that has big results. Although natural light can be beautiful, natural light is from the sun, and by its very nature, the sun is usually a pretty harsh light source (well, except for a short time about twice a day). So, we pull out one from our bag of tricks to help us make that natural light soft and beautiful.

We are on location in an abandoned old Mansion out in the middle of nowhere, Florida (I’ve lived in Florida my entire life, and I’ve never been to the town where this mansion resides — the town is called “Howey in the Hills” and this was Mr. Howey’s personal mansion back in the day.

I asked my wife Kalebra to do the art direction for the shoot, handling everything from picking the models, make-up, outfits, hair, and makeup, to directing and posing the shoot on location — that left me (and three assistants) to focus on nothing but the lighting and shooting.

Figure 2

I love the compression a long lens brings to the image, and you can see how far back I am from our subject in this over the shoulder view from my shooting position. I’m using a Canon 70-200mm lens f/2.8 lens here (that’s my go-to lens for portraits), and I’m usually shooting in the 150-200mm end of the lens, but to get the wide look I wanted, including the awesome location in the scene, I had to shoot at 70mm.

After a few test shots, I was already battling with her face being too bright. The storyline for the shoot had her looking out the window, so sunlight would be falling directly on her face. Here’s the narrative my wife came up with for the shot (which was told to the model in advance, so she’d know the story we’re having her play out with her gestures): “Everything she once knew has fallen down around her and now, Prince Charming has walked out the door but even as she falls trying to hang on to him (and searches the window after him) there is grace and hope still left in the light.”

So while the model and my wife Kalebra are working on the posing, clothing, and gesture, I’m trying to tame that harsh sun falling directly on her, and I’m even getting highlight clipping warnings on her face (I’m shooting at f/2.8 so at least I can soften the background behind her a little bit. I would have to zoom in much tighter to get the background way out of focus, which I did on some of the shots, but not the ones we’re looking at here).

Figure 3

Our trick is to turn that big harsh window light into a big beautiful softbox, by putting up a frosted shower curtain liner over the window (these are very inexpensive — only about $6 at Target and even cheaper at Walmart where I’ve seen them for $1.99. If you look at these shower curtain liners, they pretty much look just like the front diffusion panel of a softbox. Anyone who attended my first “Shoot Like a Pro Tour” learned this very trick — to keep one of these in your camera bag (they fold up really small) for situations just like this (and of course, we had one with us at this shoot as well, for —you guessed it —situations just like this).

It’s important to note — this is NOT a shower curtain. It’s the frosted liner that is sold separately that goes inside the shower curtain in a real shower.

Figure 4

Above: This is Brad using Gaffer’s tape to cover the bottom part of the window (the part hitting our model directly) with the liner.

Gaffer’s tape was invented in Hollywood for use on movie and TV sets because when you use it, and remove it, it doesn’t take the paint with it, or damage any surfaces, and it doesn’t leave a messy residue. It’s really pretty magic for stuff like this and we always have a roll with us for (wait for it…wait for it…) situations just like this (and a thousand other reasons). You can find Gaffer’s tape at any large camera store (I get mine from B&H Photo around $6 a roll).

Figure 5

Above: From this angle you can see the liner covering the window

From this angle, you can see the liner going right over the window, and you can even see in this behind the scenes shot, the light looks pretty soft now.

Figure 6

Above: Here’s the reverse angle view so you can see how far back I am from the subject at my shooting position. You can see the window covered with the shower curtain liner, but from the angle I’ll be shooting at it, it won’t be visible at all. 

Figure 7

Above: Here’s a closer look at my TetherTools shooting rig — I always try and shoot tethered like this on location if at all possible — seeing your images full screen as you shoot makes a huge difference.

My Camera Rig:
I’m shooting a Canon EOS 1Dx, but I could have just as easily used my 5D Mark III (the results would be pretty much the same since I’m shooting at 100 ISO with my camera mounted on a Gitzo Mountaineer tripod.  As I mentioned earlier, I’m using a Canon 70-200mm lens. I’m shooting in Aperture priority mode at f/2.8.

I’m supporting my laptop with a mounting bar from Manfrotto, and the laptop table is from a company called “Tether Tools” and they specialize in tools for tethering (I know, that was pretty self-explanatory). They also make that long Orange tethering cable (it’s orange so it’s more easily seen in a dark studio environment so you don’t trip over it), and I’m tethering directly into Lightroom on a Macbook Pro.

Figure 8

Above: A BTS from another shot that we tried; same location, different view.

Once we got the shot you saw at the beginning, we went for a different look in the same location (compositionally). I’ve moved a few feet over to the left, so the center of the room. You can also see two important accessories in this shot: (1) A powerful speaker system for playing Pandora radio from our phones. We feel that music on the set is very important, and the models love it, and it helps set the mood. We played some classical to get us in the mood, then we switch to whichever type of music the model likes best (that’s our rule — the model chooses the music — if they’re hearing music they love, it comes out in the image). And (2) a floor fan. We don’t want to blow her hair around, but we want it to move it just a little to add some volume to the hair, and it really makes a difference. Later in the day, we wanted the drapes blowing, so we cranked it up, and had two assistants right outside the window fanning the drapes with two large diffusers to make them blow, but that’s normally not how we use the fan — it’s just to add a little movement and volume to the model’s hair.

Figure 9sm

To create an epic feel for the image, I switched to a Canon 16-35mm wide angle zoom, and positioned my camera way down low to get a low, wide perspective. The fan is just out of the shot, so you don’t see it in the frame. We moved the couch much closer to the camera, to add more depth, and get the subject closer in the frame, so using the 16-35mm let me get lots of the floor and ceiling in the shot even with the subject and couch much closer to my shooting position.

To finish up: I hope this article gave you some ideas of how to control harsh natural window light (if it indeed is harsh), and some compositional ideas as well, and a few other little tips along the way.

That’s it for this chilly Florida Tuesday. Thanks to everybody who came out to my Tampa seminar yesterday — definitely one of my most-fun crowds of the year. Looking forward to visiting new cities next year, starting off in Richmond and Atlanta in late January — hope I’ll see you there.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. RC and I taped a “20-days of Christmas” series where each day we post another holiday gift idea — everything from lighting to camera bags and software. If you scroll down a few days here on the blog, you’ll see the first five or six, and we post a new one every day (including weekends). Hope you find them helpful. :)

Hi Gang: I’m on my way to San Francisco today for my seminar there tomorrow, but in the meantime I wanted to share some of my shots from the Tennessee Vols game this past weekend. They were playing on the road in Tuscaloosa, Alabama against the Top-10 ranked Crimson Tide, and I shared some of my favorite shots over at Exposure.co (the photo storytelling site).

Here’s the link if you’ve got sec.

(more…)

Congratulations are in order — at PhotoPlus Expo in New York last week, Canon announced a series of additions to their prestigious “Explorers of Light” program — made up of gifted photographers, cinematographers and talented educators. The new additions to the program are:

> Joel Grimes

> Lindsay Adler

> David Bergman

> Jimmy Chin

> Charles Glatzer

> Roberto Valenzuela

> Peter Hurley 

(more…)

Mornin’ everybody, from the Photo Plus Expo – it’s an absolutely beautiful day here in New York City. Not cold, not hot – just perfect with that crisp twinge of fall in the air. Perfect day to be in this amazing city. I’ve just got a few minutes, so here’s quickly what’s up:

The Morgan Library Started the day with a shoot for my “The Great Indoors” book at the Morgan Library here in Manhattan. What a just jaw-dropping place. They were kind enough to let me come in this morning before it opens to the public to get some shots for the book (a bit thanks to the incredibly patient Moriah Shtull from the Morgan, and to Grant Friedman for bringing us together). Here’s the link to the Morgan Library and Museum – this is a MUST-SEE for any photography – just stunning.

Brad is leading a location Photo shoot / walk this morning as part of Photo Plus Expo, so my buddy Jeff Revell went with me to assist (Jeff took the bts shot you see above and the one below). That’s me getting an overhead view using a fisheye lens up on a monopod, triggered by the remote you see in my other hand. Had to shoot at 6,400 in the low light, but no problem for the Canon 1Dx.

Morgan1

Here’s another BTS shot – getting down low and using Live View to help position the 11-24mm super wide angle lens. I haven’t imported the actual shots yet, but will share some next week once they’re done.

Teaching in Canon’s Booth
Yesterday I did a session on the main stage at Canon’s booth at Photo Plus Expo. My talk was How to Take Travel Photos Like a Pro, and I covered everything from the gear, to shooting recipes, to so much more. Great crowd (and thanks to RC and Brad for taking the BTS shots you see below).

canonbooth1

canonbooth2

I’m off right now to do a book signing at the Rocky Nook booth – signing my new “How Do I Do That in Lightroom” book. Hope I’l see you there.

College Football Tomorrow!
The Bucs are on the road this week, and so I’ll be shooting for the Tennessee Vols tomorrow as they take on the Alabama Crimson Tide  in Alabama’s Bryant-Denny stadium. The atmosphere is just electric at these games, so I can’t wait! (Plus, I’m trying out a Cam-Ranger rig for a remote camera shoot, and I’m not sure my idea is 100% solid, so this will either be really cool and helpful….or not. More after I try it and report back).

Hope you all have a fantastic weekend, and we’ll see ya back here on Monday. Have a good one!

-Scott

P.S. I’ll be in San Francisco next Wednesday teaching my new Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (Reloaded) seminar. Hope you can come out and spend the day with me. 

Close