Category Archives Photography

1000walks

This is just insane! So exciting, and just crazy! In just one week, over 1,009 cities already have photo walks approved as part of my 9th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk, sponsored by Canon. WOW!!!

We have NEVER had this many walks, this quickly, and I’m just absolutely delighted (and very thankful to our Leader coordinator this year, Jeanne Jilleba, who has been working her butt off getting all of these walks approved so quickly).

If you checked last week, and there wasn’t a walk in your city yet…
…I’d go back and check again. Chances are, there is one now! (link)

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Above: This is the group shot from Paris a couple of years ago, led by our friend Serge Ramelli (that’s him bottom right corner giving a thumbs up – I’m behind him standing to the right in the black Adobe hoodie. Photo by Kalebra). 

We’re still accepting new cities
If there’s not a photo walk in your area, it’s not too late to volunteer to be a Walk Leader. Head to the official “Worldwide Photo Walk” site, and click on the Lead a Walk button to apply.

Thanks to everybody who has signed up for a walk, and to everyone who has volunteered to lead one, and to Canon for making this all happen (and for providing lots of amazing prizes for the contest portion of the walk). This is just awesome!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Whoo Hoo!!! :)

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Above: The Dewitt Wallace Periodicals Room at the New York Public Library on 5th Ave. in Manhattan, taken with a Canon 11-14mm super wide-angle lens on a Canon EOS 5Ds.

Hi gang, and happy Monday. I shared the image you see above on Instagram this past weekend, and as expected, one of the photographers that follows me there wrote:

“Lightroom can easily straighten the verticals with just a few clicks, hint hint.”

Of course! I know that: I’ve written about it in my books, talked about it in my online classes, etc., but it was nice of him to let me know, anyway. ;-)

Here’s the thing…
I like it just the way it is, or I would have fixed it before I posted it on Instagram.

Even though the verticals are not “technically correct” (meaning the walls are leaning inward) I love the look a super wide angle gives. I know the verticals aren’t straight, but I love that look. It’s breaking the rules on purpose.

It’s just like breaking the “rules of composition” — if you don’t know what you’re doing and you break the rules, you’re a “goober.” If you know what the rules are, but you break them intentionally because you like the way it looks, then you’re an artist.

If I wanted the straight verticals look, I would either have used a tilt-shift lens when I shot it, or I would have fixed it in Lightroom, but I left the verticals untouched (and I generally do), in all my super wide angle images unless (and this is a biggie) it looks bad to me. That’s the “art” part of it, and a decision the photographer taking the image makes. In this case, I don’t believe the “technically correct” shot looks better. You might feel differently. See below.

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Above: Here’s what the same shot looks like when you fix the verticals in Lightroom. This is a more “technically correct” shot, but I don’t like it nearly as well.

Yes, the walls are now straight and not leaning inward. But, to me, the shot lost some of it’s “epicness.” It’s now cropped almost into a square, and I had to use Content Aware Fill and some Cloning to fill the edges. It’s really not a super wide-angle shot any longer. I don’t like what it did to the ceiling, and I just don’t like it in general. I miss my bendy walls. :)

Now, all that being said…
…it’s very possible that you prefer the second shot (the shot with corrected verticals) better and I’m OK with that. That lens distortion in the first shot (the walls leaning in) doesn’t agree with everybody — though one guy on Instagram wrote:

“…the distortion really draws me into the photo.”

I dig that guy. Plus, I agree, and I think that is part of the power of not correcting — it kind of draws you in. Anyway, when you take images really wide like this, this is a call (to correct or not correct) you’ll get to make, and I’m sure a lot of people will choose to fix the verticals. I’m cool with that too.

My style is to not fix the verticals (scroll through the images on my Instagram page and you’ll see this look again and again, along with the occasional corrected shot, too, but for me, that’s rarely the call I make). That’s the awesome thing about creating art. Everybody gets to do their “own thing.” If we all saw art the same way, what a boring world this would be.

Technically Correct vs. Artistically Correct?
Does your photo look better to you a stop under-exposed? How about 2-stops over-exposed? There’s a difference between a mistake, and an artistic decision. At the end of the day, this is a call only you can make, and as long as you’re making the call intentionally, then go make your art. :-)

A Quick Shout Out….
…to the super friendly folks in Little Rock, Arkansas who came out to catch my keynote presentation at Photo Expo 2016 last Friday night. I met so many wonderful photographers, and enjoyed the Little Rock hospitality (and the entire audience “calling the Hogs”) very much indeed. Also, a big thanks to Canon for inviting me to be there in the first place.

Have a great Monday everybody, and I hope I have given you something to think about today. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. A TON of new cities around the world just posted photo walks this weekend as part of my “9th Annual Worldwide Photo Walk” (sponsored by Canon). If you looked last week and your city didn’t have a walk organized yet, I’ll bet it does now! Here’s the link to check. 

P.S.S. I’m in Indianapolis on Thursday with my seminar. Hope you can join me. 

Hi Gang: Ready for some serious learning this weekend? Here’s my pick for five classes (including a coupla my own) to make the most of these next few days. Check these out:

(1) Master Post-Processing: 10 Mistakes Every New Photographer Makes and How to Fix Them” with Kristi Sherk
People are absolutely raving about her class. Start with it. You’ll love it, too!

(2) Going From Flat to Fabulous in Photoshop (with me) 
Come with me as I take a bunch of flat images straight out of the camera, and show you exactly step-by-step how to make them fabulous. Plus, I give you the practice files to download and follow right along.

(3) Post Processing Landscape Photos in Camera Raw with Moose Peterson
Moose truly gives you a different perspective on post processing landscapes, and really talks about the “Whys” in a really significant way, and of course, you’ll learn all the “hows” too. You’ll learn a lot.

(4) Inexpensive and DIY Photo Gear Tricks with Larry Becker
Larry is the master of saving money on gear, and his class is a hit. Very clever stuff (and he’s really entertaining just to listen to).

(5) Photo Recipes: Dramatic Lighting with…me!
In one of the installments from my new series of lighting, I cover Dramatic Lighting, and we do some fun, creative things, and I even include the retouching, so you see the entire process from start to finish.

There ya have it. If you’re not a KelbyOne member yet, you can still watch all these classes for free this weekend – just take the 10-day free trial and you can start watching them immediately.

Here’s the link to get started.

Next week, let me know which ones were your favorites. Have a great weekend, and I hope to see ya back here on Monday.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. It’s just 11-days until Photoshop World 2016 in Vegas kicks off. If you want come and join us, it’s not too late. 

 

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Hi Gang, and Happy 4th!

Today is a big holiday for us here in the US –  it’s Independence Day – a day where Americans celebrate their independence from England (around 240 years ago), but also from Glyn Dewis and Dave Clayton (two of England’s finest, but still worth keeping at a safe distance).

We celebrate by gorging ourselves with hot dogs, hamburgers, and mountains of potato chips before settling into a lawn chair with an ice cold beer to watch a glorious fireworks display using fireworks made in China. We also use the word “chips” liberally without anyone ever even once thinking we’re referring to French Fries. ;-)

If you’re thinking of photographing your local fireworks display tonight, you might want to check out an article I wrote ColaCola where I take you through the recipe for how to make Awesome Fireworks photos (It’s a step-by-step article – just follow the recipe and ya can’t miss).

Here’s the link.

However, I would add four things to that article for the more serious photography crowd here on my blog. They are:

1. Set your focus to infinity (This isn’t critical, but if your lens can do it, why not). The fireworks are so bright you can use just regular ol’ auto focus for the most part, but if you have a lens that has a distance scale window on the top of your lens barrel; first turn off your auto focus (right on the lens –  switch it to off), then rotate the focus ring on your lens until you see the Infinity symbol [it looks like the number 8 lying on its side], then turn it back just a smidge, so you’re almost right on the infinity symbol. Again, you don’t have to do this, but it might make things a bit easier.

 2. A couple of years ago @SuzanMcEvoy (one of my followers over on my Twitter page) recommended also switching your White Balance to Tungsten and it works really well (Thanks Susan for the tip).

3. Lightroom (and Photoshop’s) Dehaze feature works wonders on the extraneous smoke in the background, so make sure you give it a try. It’s like it was made for fireworks shots.

4. This one probably goes without saying, but you’re on a tripod so use your lowest ISO setting for the cleanest shots.

Hope you all have a safe, happy 4th of July as we celebrate our nation’s physical distance, in miles and magnitude, from Glyn and Dave which makes it truly a day worth celebrating. ;-)

Cheers!

-Scott

Closing eyes

Very excited to have food photographer Steve Hanson as my guest this week on “The Grid” (my live weekly photography talk show), and we’re taking your submissions now to have your food photography critiqued on this week’s show with Steve.

If you’re not familiar with Steve, here’s a quick video he did for us (below), so watch that first (Steve’s got a great story, and this video has already been viewed more than 300,000 times on YouTube!):

Pretty awesome story, right?!  Here’s the link for submitting your images: (NOTE: submit only food photography images, and only submit 3 images total. Also, make sure your images are a reasonable size for viewing).

Once you’ve submitted, watch the show LIVE on Wednesday (details below):

Who: In-Studio Guest Steve Hanson
What: Blind Food Photography Critiques
Where: http://kelbytv.com/thegrid (we also stream live to my Facebook Page)
When: Wednesday, June 29th, 2016 at 4pm EDT (New York Time Zone)
Why: To learn new ways to improve your food photography

I hope you’ll submit some images, and we look forward to you joining us (we’ll be taking your comments and questions live on the air) on Wednesday. See you then!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Are you joining us at Photoshop World in Vegas next month? Ya know, you oughta. :)

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