Category Archives Photography

scottdavepeter
Above: That’s Peter, Dave and me with St. Paul’s Cathedral in the background as we continued our series of photos of me posing in front of amazing places that won’t give me permission to shoot inside. ;-)

Howdy folks. Greetings from Birmingham, UK – I’m here for “The Photography Show” where I’m speaking today and tomorrow. I was excited to learn that my presentation today was already sold out in advance (whoo hoo!), and I’m super looking forward to meeting everybody here.

tps

I’ve spent the past couple of days here in London having a blast with two of my photography buddies: Peter Treadway and Dave Williams (from Hybrid Photography), and we’ve had such a fun time shooting and other stuff (see below). #smize #bingo #dodgy #silentletters

Here are some highlights of the trip so far:

(1) We stood at the banks of the River Thames and looked out at the MI6 Headquarters building across the river that was blown up in a recent James Bond Movie (see video below); we Googled the lyrics to Skyfall, and the three of us sang the chorus full voice (and it was quite glorious by the way), before going in to the Tate Museum to shoot its beautiful spiral staircase.

(2) We ate at Byron Burger, which was my favorite burger place in the UK (replacing my beloved Gourmet Burger Kitchen [GBK] a few years back), until I learned and experienced an even better burger: The Meat Market, in Covent Garden. Legendary! The new reigning UK burger champ in my book. The hamburger scene here is real!

(3) We went to a Tube Station and talked with a guard who let us take some shots shooting up at the escalators (yes, it’s a thing). He was cool with it as long as we didn’t use flash or a tripod, but then later a big booming voice came over the loudspeakers saying “Photographers at the bottom of escalators 14 and 15, if you don’t have permission — desist immediately.” We had permission, so we continued on for a while and then wrapped up because we had to move on to our next spot, which was…well…not what I expected.

(4) We had special permission to shoot in this beautiful, classic old theater, and it was beautiful…well…in parts. I had seen thumbnail photos of it on Google on my iPhone from an article in The Guardian online about London’s hidden interiors. The name of this classic old theater was the Gala Bingo Hall, and I figured at one time, perhaps back in the 1930s, it was a classic old bingo hall. Here’s how the Guardian described it:

“The Gala Bingo Club is the only Grade I-listed cinema in England, and one of the most lavish in Europe. It opened on 7 September 1931 as the flagship of Sydney Bernstein’s Granada empire. The exterior was a fairly conventional affair but what set the Granada apart was the interior: designed by Russian theatre designer and impresario Theodore Komisarjevsky. The real climax is the colossal auditorium, designed to seat 3,000. It has an intricate coffered Gothic ceiling, arcaded walls and gabled Gothic canopies suspended over the proscenium arch.”

All of that is true. However, what they failed to mention in that article is that it is no longer an elegant Grade-I cinema, as the Gala Bingo hall is actually now just that — a Bingo hall! Beyond that, it has no stage — it’s been replaced with a snack bar, video screens with bingo numbers and prize amounts, plus rows of booths for people playing (wait for it, wait for it) live bingo!

bingosadness
Above: This is the moment of sadness when you release that the Gala Bingo Hall is in fact, a Bingo Hall and not the only Grade 1 cinema house in all of England. Selfie by a sad Dave Williams.

So, it’s somewhat possible that my research (ahem) on this venue might not have been as tight as it should be. We still shot it, and did our best to hide the snack bar and slot machines and such, and I might have come away with something that’s not too bad, because I was using a 14mm lens, and the stage was so far away (we went to the last row of the balcony), and then of course, there’s Photoshop to hide some of that stuff (but it won’t be easy).

There’s a lesson here: Many photographers already know this, but the main reason you want “fixers” in a foreign country is so you can continuously place blame upon them, and don’t worry — I heaped it on Peter and Dave and they took it like the brave young men they are (though neither are young or brave, which made it even more fun).

sommerset
Above: Me shooting Random Stuff at Somerset House (photo by Dave Williams). 

(5) We learned that in 97.2% of all cases, Uber X drivers in London will pick you up in a Toyota Prius. You can bank on it. Nothing wrong with a Prius, just kind of funny after a while. They should just name it Prius X over here. Also, you can ask to go to well known places and most of the drivers will have no idea where they are. For example, Us: “Can you take us to the House of Parliament?” Driver: “Do you have an address?” Or “Can you take us to Buckingham Palace?” Driver: “Is that a Marriott?”

10downing

(6) Saturday night we got special permission to enter the compound at 10 Downing Street (the British Prime Minister’s Home, and the UK equivalent of The White House). We didn’t go inside and hang out with David Cameron, of course, but we did get to meet his house cat and pose in front of his front door, which is (as you might imagine) a super restricted area and behind some pretty high security, so that was pretty cool.

airbnb

(7) I did my first ever Airbnb rental and it turned out really great! An entire apartment, just outside the Buckingham Palace gardens (right around the corner from Victoria Station), and it was literally half the price of a room at the Hilton, and 5x the space, with a full kitchen, beautiful bathroom, great natural light, but a very, very unusual closet situation. Check my Facebook page, and you’ll see a live video tour of my “Swinging London Pad” and you’ll see what I mean. I’ve never seen anything like it (neither had Peter or Dave). It’s clever, but just …wow.

(8) At breakfast yesterday Peter offered me a taste of “black pudding.” It looked kind of funky so I passed. It wasn’t until after I passed that he told me black pudding is pig’s blood wrapped in the lining of the pig’s intestines. It’s lucky for Peter that I didn’t actually taste it, as that would be the defining moment when our friendship officially ended. I told him, you have an amazing selection of food in this country, from every corner of the world. Why would you voluntarily eat pig’s blood wrapped in the lining of a pig’s intestines? He will never be able to give me a satisfactory reason I could possibly accept.
up
Above: I can’t swear this is even us, but the guy on the left could be an American. 

(9) We took lots of photos in lots of different places, from architectural shots to cathedral interiors, to rooftop shots; we shot inside museums, we shot in Tube Stops, we went to Somerset House and shot the wrong spiral staircase (the old one, not the cool new one), and Dave flirted with a German waitress at Byron Burger, and went so far as to leave her his phone number on the bill. We’re still waiting for her to call him. I’m starting to get concerned, but ya know…love takes time. ;-)

guitarsinlondon

(10) Peter and Dave took me to some Awesome guitar stores! This one (shown above) was my favorite though — it’s called “Hanks” and apparently it’s quite famous in the UK, and its 2nd floor was guitar heaven. I didn’t buy any…but I wanted to! Awesome vibe in that store – just something about it (and it’s right next to Tin Pan Alley where,back in the day, musicians  would post job openings with bands. Story has it The Beatles used that job board in the early days).

train
Above: random British guys on a train. Not Peter and Dave if that’s what you’re thinking. ;-)

(11) As I write this, we’re on a train from London to Birmingham  and we’re meeting up with two of the best guys in the world (and two of the most talented): Dave Clayton and Glyn Dewis. Can’t wait to see them both. Seriously love these guys!

OK, that’s it from here in the Swingin’ UK. I’ll be sharing the photos later in the week – maybe doing an Adobe Slate or Exposure post, and I’ll share that link when I post it.

Looking forward to meeting everybody here today – please come and say “Hi” if you’re here at The Photography Show, and here’s wishing you a less weird than my weekend Monday. :)

Best,

-Scott (and my train mates Peter and Dave)

P.S. We’ve already sold out some of the Pre-Conference workshops at Photoshop World this summer , so if you’re thinking of taking one of these optional in-depth workshops the day before the conference begins, make sure you book ’em now!

adobepsapps

This week we were very fortunate to have Adobe’s own Bryan O’Neil Hughes in our studios (he was taping a KelbyOne class on using Adobe’s Mobile Apps, plus he did a live private Webcast exclusively for our members, and he was also my guest on The Grid on Wednesday). Basically, Bryan didn’t get much sleep  this week.

Anyway, if you missed any of this…
I’ve got the next best thing, which are some short clips where Bryan is giving you a glimpse of the power of some of these amazing apps (and once you see them, you’ll be even more amazed to learn that Adobe makes all of these apps available for FREE!).

Take a look at these three short videos (below) on these mobile apps in the Photoshop family: Photoshop Fix, Photoshop Mix, and Photoshop Sketch. (I’ll share some more app videos next week). A lot of folks were literally blown away at what these apps are able to do, and how they extend the power of editing your images to mobile. Really incredible stuff (and thanks Bryan for an incredible week of learning Adobe’s awesome free mobile apps).

We’re cooking up lots of cool training on mobile apps, including classes on Lightroom Mobile at this summer’s Photoshop Conference 2016 in Las Vegas (Bryan will be teaching there again this year), so I hope you can make it. If you’re a KelbyOne member, and you sign up before June 10th, you can get a full conference pass for all three days, with nearly 100 sessions to choose from, for just $599. Here’s the link with details.

Hope you all have a great weekend, and we’ll see ya back here on Monday!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. I’m off to London today and I’ll be speaking at “The Photography Show” on Monday and Tuesday. I hope to meet you in person there. Can’t wait! :)

Figure 5

Happy Friday everybody! Today I’m going to break down the  simple one-light bridal portrait you see above (camera settings, lighting and post production). Keeping it simple like this is ideal because it lowers the bride’s stress and yours, too. Plus, by just using one simple light you can focus on emotion and expression rather than fussing with a bunch of lights (it’s another one of those “less is more” things).

In this beautiful small church, there was a short hallway leading to an exit door, and some storage closets, but the doors were a vivid red color, and I thought that would contrast beautifully with our bride (who had a white dress and a pinkish bouquet). I thought we’d try posing the bride in that short hallway, but getting a light in there with the bride, without being seen in the shot, would be kind of challenging.

Lighting Gear
I used just one small flash head running an Elinchrom Ranger Quadra kit, which consists of a very lightweight battery pack (I believe it’s about 2-3/4 lbs.) with a strap on it so you can just sling it over your shoulder, and a very small, very lightweight flash head (literally just 10 ounces ). This is one of my “go-to” rigs for location lighting because:

(1) It’s very lightweight and portable — it all fits in a small carrying case that’s smaller than an airline carry-on,

(2) You get studio-quality light and a much brighter, more powerful light than you would with a hot-shoe flash,

(3) It has a built-in wireless trigger and lets me control the power of the strobe from right on my camera (the other matchbox-sized trigger sits on my cameo’s hot shoe mount),

(4) You can use two strobe heads with just this one pack if you decided you did indeed need a second light. And..

(5) …it’s designed so I can use any of my studio softboxes with it, and in this case it was a small 24×24” Elinchrom Rotalux square softbox.

Figure 1

Above: The Hallway with the red door. 

Here’s an over-the-shoulder view of the short hallway with red doors I was talking about. It’s actually much darker in the church that it shows here – this behind-the-scenes production shot was taken in Aperture Priority mode at a high ISO, so these behind-the-scenes shots look properly exposed, but in reality it was quite a bit darker, especially in the hallway, which was lit with just a few harsh overhead floods).

Figure 2

Above: Finding a place to hide the softbox was a challenge in this tight hallway, so we opened a closet door and had our 2nd assistant tuck-himself inside the doorway a bit to keep the soft box from extending into the frame.

If you look at this behind-the-scenes image, you can see me sitting in the pews, quite a-ways back from our bride — that way I could capture either tight or full length shots. The position of the light was pretty standard: at around a 45° angle from the bride, up higher than the bride and aiming down at the bride.

Figure 3-2

Above: Here’s the shot that resulted from me shooting full length from out in the pews. I’m not super-digging it, and it took a lot of post-production to tame the red light spilling everywhere and tinting everything, so the search continues for a better shot. 

GRIP TIP: We normally use a monopod for shoots like this (it’s easier to “run and gun”), rather than a lightstand with legs, but since we started our shoot using a lightstand in the back of the church, we just kind of picked it up and kept shooting. Normally, we’d prefer to have the strobe mounted on a monopod for faster and easier mobility between pews, and in tight situations. The only downside? You have to keep holding a monopod — it doesn’t “set down” very easily (there are no legs and feet) without crunching the soft box, so you wind up leaning it against things, which means you run the risk of it falling over. It’s a tradeoff (like everything, right?).

The Lighting Problem with the Red Door
I wasn’t happy with how the overall color looked because of how the light was reflecting off the red door. So, I thought we’d try one where the bride would be backlit, with just a little of the light spilling over onto her.

Figure 4

Above: Back lighting our bride 

I left the bride in the exact same spot, but I had our 2nd assistant take the strobe and softbox move to the other end of the hallway to position the light behind her and off to the side (so it’s pretty much the same lighting set-up — 45°-ish angle, up high aiming down, etc. it’s just positioned behind the bride this time, as seen above).

I did crank up the power of the light for this backlit shot, because I wanted to make sure it was powerful enough not just to put a rim of light around her shoulders, arms, etc., but that it also spilled over enough so you could see her face. I also made sure to have the bride turn her head and body toward the direction of the light. Had she been looking the other way, we wouldn’t have had enough light spilling on her face or bridal gown.

Camera Settings:
I shot in manual mode, so I could make sure the shutter speed didn’t get past the normal sync speed (this pack lets you do hyper sync, but I shouldn’t need to do that in a dark hallway), so my shutter speed was 1/60 of a second (I normally use 1/125 of a second, so I have to imagine at some point I accidentally hit the dial on the back of my camera). My ISO was set to 100 ISO (the cleanest ISO on my camera), and my f-stop was f/5 in case there was any background visible behind my subject, it will be a little bit soft. Using such a wide-open f/stop meant keeping the power of the flash at less than 1/4 power most of the time.

Post Production:
Light picks up the color of whatever it hits, so when white light hits a red door it reflects red light. Once I saw the color image of her backlit, it looked very red from the reflected light, so I knew right then it was a candidate for being converted into a black and white image.

Figure 6

Above: Converting to Black & White in Silver Efex Pro 2

I used Nik Software’s Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in to convert the image to black and white (I used use one of their built-in presets — my three favorite preset choices are (in no particular order): (1) Full Spectrum (2) Fine Art Process and (3) High Structure Smooth, so I usually wind up choosing one of these three.

Figure 7

Above: Adding the Duotone look in Lightroom CC

Once I converted the image to black and white in Silver Efex Pro 2, I added a Duotone look in Lightroom using the Split Toning panel, but then only moving the Shadow controls; putting the Hue at 25 and the Saturation slider amount at 21. Don’t touch the Highlight settings up top or the balance slider — this is all done just using the Shadows Hue and Saturation sliders, so leave the other stuff untouched. It works wonders (and prints beautifully, by the way).

Figure 5

Above: Here’s the final image with the Duotone look applied in Lightroom (same as the opening shot).

Hope you found that helpful, and I hope your Tuesday is already off to great start! . :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. I’m up in Boston with my seminar on Wednesday, March 30th — just a few weeks from now. Hope I see you there.  

This is the written tutorial of something I did in my course on using Westcott Speedlight Modifiers over on KelbyOne, and the trick is a very effective, location lighting technique for a formal portrait of the bride, and part of the technique is done in camera, and then the other part in Photoshop, and the good news is — both parts are really easy (but the final result is really sweet!).

Westcott Wedding 1sm

Above: Here’s the final image with the light hidden

The Lighting Set-up
We’re only going to use one simple hot-shoe flash for this technique. Lately I’ve been using the Phottix Odin hot shoe flashes, and I’m super-digging ’em as their just released new Phottix Odin II TTL Flash Trigger is hands down the easiest hot shoe flash transmitter I’ve ever used (it even has hard buttons for each group, which makes it incredibly easy to change groups, turn on/off flash, change the power [using a simple dial], etc.. Very smartly designed, and the price is right, at around $209).

Then, we’re going to use a collapsible softbox made for hot shoe flash — it’s the 50-inch Recessed Mega JS Apollo from Westcott (around $169 street price) Note: anyone who has been to my “Shoot Like a Pro: Reloaded” seminar would recognize this bad boy!

Figure 2

Above: The flash is mounted inside the softbox on a light stand, and then it aims inward at the back of the softbox, and the light returns back out toward the subject, giving you softer lighter without a bright hot-spot right in the center like usual.  

There are five really nice things about this softbox:

(1) It’s pretty huge, and the bigger the softbox the softer the light, so when I have a choice, I go “big” like this.

(2) It’s collapsible like an umbrella, so despite it’s large size, it’s super-portable, lightweight, and sets-up fast.

(3) The flash aims backward — toward the back of the softbox, not directly at your subject, so the light reflects and bounces back toward your subject, which avoids a hot-spot in the center and creates even softer more wrapping light all the way around.

(4) Since it’s so large, you can light groups with it

(5) For a softbox this large, $169 is really a bargain.

 

Camera Settings
When I’m shooting with flash, especially indoors like we are here at a very popular venue for weddings and wedding receptions, I’m setting my ISO at the lowest, cleanest native setting for my camera, which for my Canon 5D Mark III is 100 ISO. Since I’m using flash, I’m always shooting Manual mode so I can get my shutter speed at what I would say is a very safe, kind of “default no worries” shutter speed for flash, which is 1/125 of a second. Lastly, my f/stop is usually around f/5.6 if I want the background a little soft but in this case I went with f/4 (I probably accidentally hit the dial on the back of my camera at some point and it moved my f/stop).

The lens I’m using for this particular shot is in vast contrast to the price of all the lighting gear, because it’s a high-end lens — Canon’s new 11-24mm ultra wide-angle lens shot at 11mm (which is just insanely great). Of course, you don’t have to use this lens (but man is it sa-weet!) — any nice wide angle will do the trick (like the 16-35mm).

You’re going to take Two Shots. Shoot this one first.
First you’re going to position the light right near your subject, in this case I’m positioning it right next to our bride and as you can see from the production shot here, the lighting isn’t aimed directly at her — it’s kind of aimed a bit past her so the light is just skimming her a bit. That way, the light is more subtle and softer because the light that’s hitting her is from the edges of the softbox, instead of from the center (you’ve heard this technique referred to as “feathering” the light). You can also see my photo assistant Brad “The Beard” Moore standing by as I take the shot. This is important (more on why in just a moment).

Figure 4

Above: Here’s the shot with the softbox fully visible in the image. That’s OK – you’re supposed to see it in a wide angle shot like this, but it won’t be there for long. 

Then comes the 2nd shot
Once you take that shot, where you can clearly see the softbox, ask your assistant (or friend, or friend of the bride) to pick up the light (it’s not heavy) and move it far away so you don’t see the light at all in the scene, and take your second shot. You want to keep your camera up to your eye the entire time, so minimize your movement between frames. Of course, if you’re shooting on a tripod, it doesn’t matter — you can theoretically take all the time you want, but you need to tell your subject (the bride in this case) to please hold her pose until you’ve taken both shots, so you don’t want to take too long between shots.

So, the process is this:

> Get your light in place
> Take the first shot, and keep the camera up to your eye.
> Have someone move the light out of the scene quickly and take the 2nd shot. Pretty easy stuff.

Figure 5

Above: Here’s the second shot, once the light has been removed. All you’re getting is the ambient light in the reception hall and no light from the flash. 

The post processing part is easy
Now open both images in Photoshop. Go to the image that has the bride lit by the flash; select all and copy that entire image into memory.

Figure 6

Above: Open both images in Photoshop; copy the shot with the flash in it into memory. 

Now go to the image with no flash (the ambient light image) and paste that image with the lighting visible right on top. If you used a tripod, you can skip this step and go on to #8, but if you handheld the shot (like I did), you’ll need to have Photoshop automatically Align the two images so they were perfectly aligned with one another.

You do this by going to the Layers panel; selecting both layers, and then go under the Edit menu and choose “Auto Align Layers” as seen below. When the Auto Align dialog appears, use the default setting of “Auto” and click and in just a few moments your two images will be perfectly aligned. Note: you’ll need to slightly crop the image to hide the white edges created by the alignment, but we’ll do that later.

Figure 7

Above: Paste the lighting shot onto the unlit shot, then select both layers and use Auto Align Layers to perfectly align them. 

Go to the Layers panel and click on the top layer (the layer with the lighting). Next, hold the Option key on Mac (the Alt key on a Windows PC) and click the Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers panel (it’s the third button from the left). This adds a black layer mask over your entire layer, so the lit layer is now hidden behind that black mask, which is exactly what we want. Now, get the Brush tool and choose a small soft-edged brush from the Brush Picker up in the Options Bar at the top of the screen. Make sure you Foreground color is set to white. Now take the brush tool and simply paint over the bride and now she appears “lit” as you’re revealing just that one part of the lit image layer that was hidden behind that black mask (this is similar to the trick we used last issue for creating a cityscape at dusk).

As long as your bride isn’t close to the background in the shot, you won’t have any trouble painting her in — it’ll take all of five seconds. If she’s close to the background, then you have the worry of spilling light onto the background as you reveal the lit version of her. You can still do it, you just have to be more careful, take more take, and use a smaller brush.

Figure 8

Above: Add an inverted Layer Mask (hold the Option key on Mac, or the Alt key on Windows, then click the Layer Mask icon) to the lit layer; take a brush and paint over the bride in white to reveal the lit version of her in just that area. No spill on the ground, or the walls, or anything.

The last step is to use the Crop tool to crop away those white edges created by the Auto Align move. Lastly, I hate to say just “Add contrast” but — add some contrast in Camera Raw; sharpen the image, and you’re done.

There ya go: Some camera work, some Photoshop work, and a beautifully lit final image without spending a bunch of money.

Hope you found that helpful, and if you’re a KelbyOne member and want to see the full video on it, here’s the link.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Next week, I’m coming to New York City with Part 2 of my “Shoot Like a Pro: Reloaded” seminar. Hope you can join me. 

scottstage

Mornin’ everybody – here’s what’s up:

New Tour Dates and Cities for My Seminar
We just added a bunch of new cities and dates for my full-day “Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (Reloaded) Seminar” [photo above by Kevin Newsome]— they are:

> March 3 – New York, NY – View
> March 30 – Boston, MA – View
> April 26 – Seattle, WA – View
> April 29 – Portland, OR – View
> May 12 – San Diego, CA – View
> June 7 – Orlando, FL – View
> June 9 – Ft. Lauderdale, FL – View
> July – Nashville, TN (exact date in July TBA)
> August – Indianapolis, IN (exact date in Aug TBA)
> August – Columbus, OH (exact date in Aug TBA)
> September. 21 – Minneapolis, MN
> September 23 – Milwaukee, WI
> October – Arlington, TX  (exact date in Oct TBA)
> October  – Sacramento, CA (exact date in Oct TBA)
> November 14 – Denver, CO
> November 16 – Las Vegas, Nevada
> December, Charlotte, NC (exact date TBA)
> Plus a few more cities yet to be announced.

Hope I’ll see you in one of these cities (you can find out more details here).

 

psw2016

Photoshop World Registration Opens Next Week
I can’t wait to tell you what we have in store this year for the Photoshop World Conference (including some awesome new instructors we’ve added to the roster, some fun new events, cool new classes, and lots more). Registration opens next week for this year’s conference in Las Vegas. Awwwwyeah!

I’ll post a link here when registration goes live next week, but you can start planning now because the official dates are July 19-21, 2016 (at the beautiful Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino). It’s going to be (wait for it…wait for it…) epic!  :-)

memonly

Rebroadcast of our Canon Total Gear Head Live Q&A
On Wednesday afternoon we did a special live Q&A exclusively for KelbyOne members featuring two of the super genius tech guys at Canon (Rudy Winston – DSLR tech guru seen above right, and Brent Ramsey -DSLR Video guru seen above left).  They were there to answer questions about the newly announced Canon EOS 1D X Mark II, and we have the rebroadcast now available and the questions were just pouring in.

The feedback we have received has just been phenomenal, if you’re a KelbyOne member, you can watch the rebroadcast right now at this link. (if you’re not a member, you can take the free 10-day trial and watch it that way, along with all the rest of our classes). Thanks to our friends at Canon for lending us Rudy and Brent – they totally rocked it!

 

weddingbook

New Online Classes
Yesterday, we mentioned my new KelbyOne online class on Designing Beautiful Wedding Albums in Lightroom, but I thought it was important to let you know about what makes this class different than my existing online class on creating Photo Books in Lightroom.

This class is really about the design of the book – the layout, and creating beautiful looking photo books – that’s the focus of the book — not learning all the Lightroom photo book features (even through you wind up learning those, too). Check out the preview here. 

Also, here’s a peek at some of our other upcoming online classes already taped and in post production:

> Get Up To Speed Fast on the Sony a7R II
> Photo Recipes: Dramatic Lighting
> Using the Canon 600EX RT Hot Shoe Flash
> Design Basics for Adobe InDesign
> Adobe InDesign for Photographers
> Light Painting & Photographing The Stars
> DIY Photography Gear Solutions

Next month we’re taping new KelbyOne online classes with Moose Peterson, along with new classes from Photoshop Retouching Shark Kristina Sherk, and Adobe’s own Bryan O’Neal Hughes on using Adobe’s latest mobile apps, PLUS I have a few new classes I’m taping as well — one on my own simple system for organizing your images, and 10 Things Every DSLR User Should Know. 

Just a quick look at what’s coming your way — hope you all have an awesome weekend (hate to see that football season has ended), and we’ll see ya here next week.

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Houston, Texas — I’ll be there a week from today. Come on out!

instatall
You guys have probably heard me talking about the role “size” plays on the impact of your images, especially when they’re viewed on the Web, and this tip really reinforces that concept.

Last night I was working on a post for our other blog (LightroomKillerTips), about some new Lightroom presets from “The Creativv” and while I was on their site I saw a post they had written about an Instagram tip —  something I hadn’t realized they added when Instagram recently added the ability to post landscape images (instead of just square images), you can now post images in Portrait (tall) mode as well.

The tip is — if you crop your image to a 4×5 ratio (a built-in cropping preset in Lightroom), your image then takes up pretty much the entire screen (see above right).

Compare the impact of the image on the far left, with the full screen portrait image on the right (note: if you scroll down, you’ll still see the caption for the image, but if you want more impact and engagement, I believe the one on the right will bring a lot more of both).

Here’s the link to their post (with the step-by-step cropping Lightroom details):

IMPORTANT: There’s one thing they didn’t mention in their post that had me scratching my head for a moment, and that is — once your image is in Instagram, you need to tap that little landscape/portrait button in the lower left corner of the image to switch your image to portrait orientation (from square). In the preview, this will show a gap on either side of your image, but when you post it, the gap doesn’t appear (as seen above right).

Also, thanks to all the awesome feedback I’ve gotten from my “How to Build Your Audience on Instagram” online class — as an educator, that type of feedback has us walking on air.

JOIN ME TOMORROW — If you’re a KelbyOne member, tomorrow at 2pm New York Time we have a live broadcast with two of Canon’s awesome super techie guys doing a live Q&A exclusively for KelbyOne members. Keep an eye out on your email for the link to come join us — we’ll be answering questions about the new Canon EOS 1D X Mark II, and anything else you can ask to stump our DSLR and DSLR video gurus (Rudy and Brent know this stuff at a terrifying level).

Hope you find that Instagram tip helpful (and thanks to Creativv for sharing it). :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Why did Adele cross the road? To say “Hello from the other side.” ;-)

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