Category Archives Photography


I love behind the scenes training videos, and “Session from Joey L” is the brand new DVD from rising star photographer Joey Lawrence (remember his amazing guest blog here earlier this year? Here’s the link), goes beyond that, as he answers some of his most-asked questions about his lighting techniques and his Photoshop pro-processing moves.

I’ve been going through the DVD myself this past week (it’s available as a DVD or direct download), and I have to say—-it’s very cool seeing how he puts these shoots together (he’s got a really cool job, and get some amazing gigs).

He’s got a preview video on his site, and if you’ve got a minute, give it a look (warning: if you watch the preview; you’ll be hooked). Luckily, the disc lives up to the hype. Congrats Joey on being willing to share what you’ve learned. Here’s the link for more info, or to order his disc.


Well, now that Photoshop World Vegas is in the history books, I guess it’s time to get back to “real life” and the ol’ blog-a-roo. In that spirt, here’s what’s up:

Update on the New “Photoshop User TV
We’re just about finished building-out the new studio, with its totally new look, and new way-cool format for the show, and in just a couple of weeks, we’ll be launching our new season of Photoshop User TV, with loads of new Photoshop tutorials and tricks (and more content than ever!). We’re just getting so close now I thought I’d better check in and let you know it’s moving along really well. We’ve been running some “mini-shows” during the construction phases, but we’re almost there. Also, Matt Kloskowski and I are launching a new digital photography show as well (the one that’s taking the place of D-Town), and it’ll be up and running right after we get the new and improved Photoshop User TV on the air. Lots of really cool stuff coming up!

Incredible Sports Portraits from Photographer Paul Aresu
Somehow I came across the site of sports portrait photographer Paul Aresu and OMG this guy’s stuff just rocks! Great photography and great post production all the way around. Even if sports doesn’t interest you on any level, his images will. Just incredible work! (here’s the link).

You’ve got to read this article on ethical cropping
I found this New York Times essay, by photographer David Hume Kennerly absolutely fascinating, and if you’ve ever had an ethical debate about what can be done in Photoshop, then read this article about what can be done with just a simple crop. Here’s the link.

My Lightroom Tour is in the Detroit Area next week
I’ll be in Livonia, Michigan next Friday for my “Lightroom 2 Live Tour” and it’s the first time I’ve brought my Lightroom Workshop to Michigan, and I’m really excited about it (We already have nearly 350 photographers signed up), and I hope you’ll join me for a day that’ll change the way your manage and edit your photos—-guaranteed! Here’s the link with details.

That’s about all for today. We’ve got LOTS of cool stuff in the works, so keep an eye here on the blog. It’s going to be a wild 4th quarter for sure!!!! Have a great one!



If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you probably remember a post I did back in May of last year called “My Day with Jay” and it was about a remarkable day of learning I had walking the streets of New York City for a few hours with a true living legend of photography: Jay Maisel. (Here’s the link in case you missed it).

Here are some comments I got from that post:

“Thanks for sharing your amazing experience. I wish I also had got a chance to walk with him and learn from him.”

“I can only echo everyone else’s comments (thanks for sharing about your experience with Jay–what a master!) and requests (please, pretty please, share a bit more about how to shoot in the city while being unobtrusive)!

“As with some of the other posts, How do you shoot people? I, too, and afraid that I will get in trouble.”

“I’d love to take pictures of people in the street but I am afraid of it…”.

“As some other mentioned before are there any helpful tips and tricks on shooting on the street? It sounds always so easy but mostly I am “scared”or feel uncomfortable shooting people on the street.”

There were many other comments because people have so many questions about this stuff, and of course Jay is arguably the master of this genre. That’s why on Wednesday I flew up to New York City, with a Kelby Training video crew (and Brad Moore, who took the production photo above), to create Your Day with Jayan online class for Kelby Training Online. It was even more amazing than my first walk with him.

My goal was just to be there to keep things moving; to prompt him with the same kind of questions I thought you guys might have, and basically let Jay do all the talking.

Just like on “My Day With Jay,” Your Day with Jay starts out at Jay’s studio in Manhattan, and then we headed down through the streets around his neighborhood, his camera in hand, then we caught a subway to 42nd street; we shot a little in Times Square, then headed down 42nd street to Bryant Park, and ended up at Jay’s favorite local restaurant for lunch and more conversation, which included an impromptu shoot of our waitress and the owner. We wrapped at Jay’s studio with a personal tour, and commentary on some of his favorite pieces, along with even more learning.

It was truly an amazing day packed with wisdom, insightful comments, humor, and humility. I learned more about photography than I have in years (including an eye-opening revelation about my frustrations with my own photography), and I think by letting Jay just be Jay, we came away with something really special. It’s real. Not rehearsed. The shots he took happened as they happened. The situations. The people. The challenges. You see how he deals with all of it–you see it, hear it, experience it all firsthand like you’re walking right alongside him.

It was part roving class. Part documentary. Part creative thinking class. Part photography master class. And parts will even bring a tear to your eye.

Although a lot of this class is devoted to teaching you to how to shoot people in the street (and he answers all those lingering questions), he covers so much more than that, on so many levels, and he covers so many different photography topics. I’m so glad I was there, and I’m so glad that now you’ll get to be there, too.

I’ll let you know when Jay’s class “goes live” on Kelby Training Online (there’s still lots of video editing and production work to be done), but when it does, I promise you—-you’ll have a day you’ll never forget.


I’m not talking about “metallic prints” (which are prints made on Kodak metallic-finish paper) I’m talking about images actually printed on metal (well, Aluminum to be exact). I got two different kinds in the past two weeks, from two different sources, so I’m going to cover them both here.

First, the print I’m holding above, which is from Image Wizards, and it’s one of their “AluminArte” images (which they call, “High Definition Images on Aluminum”).

On their site (link) they make a pretty bold statement:

“Remember the first time you saw HDTV? Our AluminArte samples will show you a level of imaging never seen before.”

I have to admit—it’s actually right on the money. My buddy Matt Kloskowski had the first AluminArte print I’d ever seen (it was of his amazing landscape shot of a barn in Washington State’s Polouse region), and when it came in the office, we all just stood around it slack-jawed. I’d never seen anything like it. Then when mine print came in (shown above), we all did the same thing—the depth and detail is like what you see on HDTV (compared to regular broadcast).

The sad thing is—-in a regular photo of it (like you see above—photo by Brad Moore), you lose all that depth and dimension that you see so clearly in person (just imagine seeing a HDTV image on a regular TV with no HD and you know what I mean). I found a video on their site, about the process, but again, because it’s video, it can’t show the depth of this type of printing on any level (this is just one of those “you have to see it with your own eyes” type of things).

Anyway, I’m incredibly impressed, and I’m going to have some of my favorite images reprinted as AluminArte images when I get back from Photoshop World. Here’s the link to their site.

Now, onto the 2nd type of metallic printed image:


This one is actually a six-piece mural (made up of six 12″x12″ metallic tiles) from Metal Murals and although theirs isn’t the Hi-Def type of images that I got from Image Wizards, the impact here comes from the size and presentation.

The funny thing is; these two types of images had a different impact on different groups of people. The photographers in my office lost their minds over the quality of the Hi-Def  image (shown above), but everybody (the non-serious photo crowd) were all taken in by the mural. Everybody was talking about it when it came in (and a bunch of golfers in the office wanted to snag it for their office).

The pole they’re connected to (shown here, with the help of Brad Moore—photo by Matt Kloskowski), are also how you mount them to your wall (it came with the mounts, and it’s pretty darn clever how the whole thing works).

Also, you can buy a much smaller 12″x12″ sample version (the size of just one tile) if you want to make a proof for your client before creating the final full-sized mural. Since the mural will have gaps, I think this is really a smart idea—especially if you’re creating a really large mural (these murals can be any size, and not just made up of 12″x12″ squares, and you can have more than just six squares).

They’ve got a page of samples on their site (link) and from their sample page, these must be very popular for tradeshow displays (or it just includes a lot of photos from their own tradeshow booth—I couldn’t tell). Here’s the link to Metal Murals Website.

Anyway, despite the fact that the ‘metallic-ness’ of both types of printing get totally lost when you show a regular photo of them (like you see here), when you see them in person—-either one—-you’ll be amazed at how much impact they have.