Category Archives Photography

A few weeks back when we had Jared Polin (Fro Knows Photo) as our in-studio guest on “The Grid,” Jared asked if we could do an interview earlier that day (for his “RAW Talk podcast”), and he’d have his crew set up cameras in my office and we’d just go for it, and I guess I went for it with some very candid answers.

I’ve gotten a lot of great feedback on the interview and I have to say Jared did a great job by not asking the standard ol’ questions. He kind of let the interview go wherever we took it, and we took it down some streets I haven’t been down in interviews before, which I think is really cool.

Anyway, I’ve embedded the video above so you can watch it right here. My thanks to Jared for the opportunity and for coming down and being our guest on “The Grid.”

Today, I'm spending the entire day with a test-group of folks who will see the first draft of my all new "Shoot Like a Pro: Reloaded" tour. These fine, wonderful photographers will share all sorts of valuable feedback on my presentation so that when I launch the tour in Salt Lake City in April, it will be totally rockin' right out of the gate. Plus, I'm excited that I'll be teaching in our own brand new, in-house theater in front of a live audience (super psyched about that).

Hope you all have an awesome Monday!




Hi Gang: Lot’s of new stuff today:

Above: Here’s the Canon EOS 5DS model.

Above: Here’s the 5Ds R model.


Canon Announces a Full Frame 50.6-megapixel high-resolution DSLR

There are actually two versions : the Canon EOS 5DS and the 5DS R [“with the sensor’s low-pass filter rendered neutral. By cancelling the effect of the filter, the 50.6MP sensor is enabled to deliver an even higher resolution with more intricate details.”]. These are the highest resolution DSLRs out there (well, they’re not quite out-there yet â”  B&H’s page on the cameras says “expected availability” is around June).

The prices are pretty amazingly low for that high a resolution camera: The 5DS is $3,699 and the 5Ds R is $3,899.

Here’s a list of the specs (from Canon):

> Newly designed 50.6 Megapixel full-frame CMOS helps deliver ultra-high resolution images for large-scale printing and extensive, creative cropping, while Dual DIGIC 6 Image Processors enable spectacular image quality and processing speed.

> EOS Scene Detection System features a 150,000-pixel RGB+IR Metering Sensor for excellent precision.

> 61-Point High Density Reticular AF including up to 41 cross-type AF points and EOS iTR allows for high precision autofocus.

> Advanced mirror control mechanism and new user-selectable shutter release time lag helps suppress camera vibration for reducing image shake.

> Anti-flicker helps compensate for flickering light sources and provides consistent exposure and color during continuous shooting.

> Built-in intervalometer and bulb timer helps deliver expanded creativity.

> 1.3x and 1.6x crop shooting adds superb flexibility, while still delivering high resolution images required for demanding applications.

> Intelligent Viewfinder II with approximately 100% viewfinder coverage.

> Full HD 30p movie capability and Time Lapse Movie function, which takes still photographs at set intervals and combines them into a Full HD movie file.

> High-speed continuous shooting up to 5.0 fps allows you to capture fast action.

> 3.2-inch ClearView II LCD monitor, 170° viewing angle, 1,040,000-dot VGA, reflection resistance with multi coating and high-transparency materials for bright and clear viewing.

> Customizable Quick Control Screen allows you to quickly change frequently used camera settings and functions.

> Support for USB 3.0.

I haven’t had a chance to take this baby out for a spin yet, so at this point I can’t tell you much more than the specs you see above. With those crazy-high megapixel specs normally usually only seen on Medium Format cameras, it looks like the camera will be aimed at the serious landscape photographer, commercial photographers, and portrait photographers that need to make really, really large prints. So basically, the medium format crowd, but at prices that are around $25,000 less (I know resolution alone doesn’t make a medium format camera, a medium format camera, but it’s a good place to start).

You can read the official press releases here.

Canon Announces new 11-24mm zoom lens for Full Frame bodies
OK, this one I am totally drooling over. I already contacted Canon begging to do a field test on it, and if this puppy is as sharp or sharper than my Canon 16-35mm, this will be the next lens I’m buying. I’ve been dying to go wider than 16 with a zoom without going all the way to a fisheye (I already have the 8-15mm fish), so this lens is so right up my alley. Can’t wait (here’s the link to Canon’s press-release).

In Other Friday News: My New Lightroom Tethering and Lightroom Mobile Online Class is Now Available
This new class just went live, and I take you through how to set-up to shoot tethered directly into Lightroom (including how to troubleshoot when things get wonky), and I take you through how to incorporate Lightroom Mobile into your portrait photography workflow. If you’re a KelbyOne subscriber, you can check it out right here.

If you’re not a KelbyOne subscriber, it’s time to get on board (you’ll super-dig it). Here’s the link with details on how to become a member and get access to all our huge library of online training classes on Photoshop, Lightroom and Photography.

OK, it’s after midnight, I’m hitting the sack.

Hope you guys have an awesome weekend!




Hi everybody – good to see ya here!

I flew up to Nashville yesterday, just for the day, for the Imaging USA Conference & Expo, where I did a presentation on sports photography in Canon’s booth (excellent show by the way â” lots of buzz and really engaged photographers up there).

Anyway, I was standing beside the KelbyOne booth on the Expo Floor and a photographer from Colorado named Scott Yakel came up (nice guy), and we started talking. He was complaining that he looked thoroughly in my “Photoshop Book for Digital Photographers” and couldn’t find anything in there about how to prepare images for entering into a Print Competition (he’s a PPA member and he and his friends enter images into the local PPA chapter’s print competition). In particular, there was nothing in there on how to add a black border around your image as required by the Print Competition rules.

Anyway, I agreed that there was not a dang thing in my book about that topic, but then, he mentioned that he’d like to take it a bit farther and add a thin stroke inside that border using a color pulled from the image itself. He and his friends were really struggling with a simple way to do this, so I pulled out my laptop there at the booth, and I showed him what I’m going to share here with you now (I figured if he and his friends were struggling with this, they’re not probably not the only ones, and honestly unless you’ve been using Photoshop for a while, it’s not super-obvious how to do this).

Anyway, here ya go Scott (and friends), a recap of what I showed you on my laptop about how to prepare images for entering into Print Competitions (Well, at least the ones at PPA in Colorado, where the first prize is a really huge bag of pot. Totally kidding â” I’m sorry â” I just couldn’t help myself. It’s my first Colorado pot joke â” everybody should be allowed at least one, especially when they have the munchies. Whoops, that’s two).

STEP ONE: Here’s the original image opened in Photoshop. We want to add a 4-inch black border and a stroke inside that border.


STEP TWO: Go under the Image menu and choose Canvas Size to bring up the window you see above. At the bottom, for Canvas extension color choose Black (as seen here) from the pop-up menu. Now enter the number of inches of black border you want surrounding your image (in this case, he wanted to add 4-inches on all sides, so enter 4 inches for Width; 4 for Height and click OK.

STEP THREE: When you click OK, it adds that 4-inch black border around the image, as seen above. Some folks will end the process right there â” short and sweet â” but Scott wanted to add a thin stroke inside that black border (I’m not talking about myself in the third person here, like “Shaq likes his fries spicy” â” I’m referring to Scott Yakel, who asked about this technique.)

STEP FOUR: Now, go to the Layers panel and click the New Layer button to add a new blank layer above your background layer. Now get the Rectangular Marquee tool and drag out a selection that fits inside the black border we added (as seen here).

STEP FIVE: Now let’s add a stroke around that selection. Go under the Edit menu and choose Stroke. When the Stroke dialog appears, choose your stroke width (in this case, Scott wanted 9-pixels [Scott likes his pixels thick] and then I clicked on the Color Swatch to bring up the Color Picker (seen at left here), and then I dragged my cursor outside the Color Picker and out over my image (it appears over my image as the Eyedropper tool), then I clicked in the trees to sample the color of those trees to use as my stroke color. Click OK to close the Color Picker now, then click OK in the Stroke dialog to add a green 9-pixel stroke to your layer. Now you can Deselect your selection by pressing Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D).

STEP SIX: Here’s the final image, with the black border and the thin green stroke inside it (click on the image to see a much larger size).

OK, that’s it. Scott’s going to head to bed now (now that actually is me speaking about myself in the third person). Scott’s tired. Scott took two flights today on Southwest. That tires Scott out. Scott doesn’t like coach. Scott misses Delta and his free upgrades. Scott likes frequent flyer programs. Scott likes TSA Pre. Scott’s out. Peace. :)


P.S. Don’t forget to catch me and RC on “The Grid” tomorrow at 4pm. Scott will be on the air. Scott likes air. 



Happy Friday, everybody!. Here’s what’s up:

One minute and 41-seconds of brilliant advice for photographers
We do an “Inspire Me Monday” piece each week on our KelbyOne Facebook page and this week it’s a short 1-minute and 41-second clip taken from our business interview with Dave Black, and his advice to someone who asked him how to handle a portrait shoot with an athlete is just brilliant. Simple, yet so smart. You’ve got it watch it. It’ll be the best minute forty-one you spend today on your photography.

If you’re a Wedding or Portrait photographerâ¦
We’re doing a giveaway for TWO Full Platform passes to WPPI (the big Wedding and Portrait photographers conference & Expo in Vegas, coming end of Feb/Early March), plus a 1-year KelbyOne Membership (the prize package is valued at $598). Not too shabby. Details to enter are here. (by the way, I spoke at WPPI last year — one of the best shows I’ve ever been to. Absolutely first rate!).

If you’re into Lightroomâ¦
I posted #3 of my “10 Things I would Tell New Lightroom Users” series over at – hope you’ll check it out if you get a minute. While you’re there, check out Pete Collins post yesterday about applying presets on import. Really good stuff.

Secrets of Professional Photographersâ¦
Yesterday, on “The Grid” RC hosted sports photographer Dave Black and lifestyle photographer Erik Valind, and the reviews have been fantastic! You can watch it above (I haven’t had a chance to see it yet myself, but I’ve heard rave reviews. Figures, they crush it when I’m not there). ;-)

Shooting Tethered & Lightroom Mobile Studio Workflow
Next Thursday we’re releasing another of my new Lightroom online classes (we release new full-length online classes each Thursday on KelbyOne), and this one is on setting up Lightroom to shoot tethered and then how to incorporate Lightroom Mobile into your own workflow. Keep an eye out for it next week on KelbyOne.

A Big Shoutout and Thanks!
What an amazing week! I had over 1,000 photographers come out to my “Shoot Like a Pro” seminar this week in Columbus, Richmond, and Raleigh and I met some of the most gracious, kind, and just downright fun people during those three days! I’m very grateful to everyone who came out and spent the day with me, and I hope to see you all again next year. NOTE: I made it through the entire trip without buying a guitar, despite visiting three music stores along the way. I think that’s a record for me. ;-)

Catch me LIVE on Monday at ImagingUSA
I’ll be teaching a session on stage at the Canon booth at PPA’s ImagingUSA show in Nashville on Monday, so if you’re at the show, I hope you’ll stop on by and say Howdy.

One more thing:
If you see me in Nashville on Monday, my wife would probably appreciate it if you would please stop me from sneaking off to Gruhen Guitars shop. Last time I was there I wound up shipping back this candy apple red Fender telecaster). ;-)

Hope you all have a fantastic weekend! (I’ll be home on the couch recuperating) and I hope to see you back here on Monday!








OK, it’s not actually a “Photo storytelling app” –  it’s a Storytelling app that just happens to be really good for photo-storytelling
When I did a “First look” at Project Luca, back in December (here’s the link) there were things I really liked about it (like professionally designed themes, different fonts, a decent level of customization, that it’s app-based, there’s motion options and dissolves, and lots of stuff that makes it great for photographers who want to tell a story).

There was also some key stuff I felt was missingâ¦
â¦and I called them out on it pretty seriously in the article. The Project Luca team wrote me back that same day saying that a lot of the things I complained about (not being able to reorder photos, you couldn’t center captions, updating your story was funky at best, and hidden somewhere hard to find at work, and so on) and they let me know that stuff, and more, was coming in a future build. Well, I’m happy to say, they just released a pretty significant update (the app is still in a limited public beta” you can request to try it out at this link), and it’s come a long way in a short time.

Above: There’s better control over your photo size and location including the ability to move a place photo up or down within your story, which is a big improvement.

Here’s what the Project Luca team noted are the new features in the latest update:

– Centered captions

-Support for high res images on desktop browsers (folks said my London Luca project looked VERY pixelated when viewed on a desktop computer).

– (a little thing, unless you can’t find where they hide the themes)

-New publish dialog

-New theme

-Image re-ordering (much needed, and it works great)

-Photo grid image re-ordering (also needed. So glad this feature made it)

-Better copy/paste support (respects line breaks) (Oh, hallelujah!) 

But there’s still no bold and no italic
That’s a deal breaker for a storytelling app, because without those two, what do we have left at our disposal for emphasis? ALL CAPS?

They fixed a lot of the really glaring issues, which is great. Just one more hurdle to go: 
Building a Luca is still not intuitive enough. I talked about this pretty extensively in my previous post, and while stuff that was missing is now there, the overall process of building a Luca is still kind of counter-intuitive. For instance, the way you start adding photos and writing a story in the default template and then later you pick the template you actually want. Wouldn’t you pick the template first? If not, you start off working in a template you’re not going to use. The app has a lot of quirks like that. Sure, eventually you figure out how to do most of what you want, but do you really have extra time to “figure out” an app, or should it all just make sense?

They’re close. Really close. 
The experience for the reader is actually very good. If they can tackle the authoring experience issues, and make putting a Luca together more of a pleasure than a puzzle, they’ll pretty much have it licked. I’ll keep you updated as they move toward shipping the final version.

Give it try yourself
Give it a try for yourself and see what you think, and let me know if I’m just being too picky (which is entirely possible, but when I see something this close to being really amazing, I want to help push it over that edge to greatness). Get early access over at

That’s it from cold, gray, snowing Columbus, Ohio
where I’ll be spending the day inside, toasty warm with 300+ photographers who are here for my Shoot Like a Pro Tour. Really looking forward to meeting everyone today, and I’ll be sure to share a photo of Brad’s first-morning fresh beard at breakfast, over on my Instagram account to start your day off right. ;-)



P.S. I’ll be in Richmond on Wednesday with the tour, then Raleigh on Friday. Come out and spend the day with me.

This week, our in-studio guest on the Grid was renowned wedding photographer Cliff Mautner, and it was one of our best, most-informative episodes ever. It’s a 60-minute show but Cliff was on such a roll, and so “in the zone” that we let it run over to a full 90-minutes, and the feedback we are getting is just incredible. Here’s just a few of the comments:

“I’m glad that show went longer than 60 minutes, but I would have enjoyed that going on for many hours. 90 minutes was a bonus though. That was a GREAT episode! The Grid is off to a great 2015, first Joel Grimes, then Cliff Mautner. Wow!” [John Pokocky]


“Any chance this could be a part I episode and get him back for a part II? I could’ve watched him do critiques all day!” [Joel Thomas]


“Cliff was great. He joins Joe and Moose for my favorite blind critique guests.” [Tony Drumm]

It was supposed to be one of our “Blind Critique” shows, and we asked for just wedding images, and technically it was but we only got to 9 critiques if that tells you how it went. Cliff covered everything from the business side of weddings to the creative side, and his insights were just so incredibly valuable - it was more like an online class than a show (except for the goofy parts, and there were a few really funny moments).

Anyway, if you’re a wedding photographer, I would really encourage you to sit down and watch the show this weekend. I promise you, you’ll learn a lot and it won’t cost you a dime.

Hope you all have a fantastic weekend; hope you get some great shots, and we’ll see you back here on Monday.