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  • Category Archives Photoshop

    I forgot to post this fisheye shot from the game in Miami last week, but when I was getting ready to post it, I thought, "I wonder if I should correct the fisheye distortion?" So, I gave it a shot. In Photoshop CS5, it's an automated process---just open the image in Camera Raw, go to the Lens Correction panel, and turn on the Profile correction and it does the rest in all of two-seconds flat. Here are the results: (Above: Here's the original uncorrected photo, taken with a Nikon 10.5mm fisheye---a DX cropped lens on a FX full-frame body. I love how this DX lens looks on the Full frame body---it's not too over the top). (Above: Here's the fisheye effect corrected, removing all the roundness that comes with shooting a fisheye lens, using the Photoshop technique I mentioned above). The top one looks…

    After I did that post last week about my shooting the Notre Dame vs. Tulsa game, and I showed that commemorative poster I was making for my buddy Jim who went with me (Jim's a long time Notre Dame fan), I got a number of comments and emails asking how I did it, so I put together this short video, which starts with just the image, goes into Photoshop for the layout stuff, and then lastly to MPIX.com to turn it into a framed print (I show the final framed image in the video). Hope this helps. :-)

    I gotta tell ya---I wasn't there long, but I had a blast!!!! I flew out Wednesday night, got there Thursday at 8:08 am (slept a bit on the plane), and by the time I got to my hotel and caught a quick 45 minute nap, I grabbed my camera and headed out the door to meet Dave Clayton and Glyn Dewis (two faithful readers of my blog, and otherwise horrible people). (Above: That's Dave and I posing in front the famous Leaning Tower of Big Ben. Notice how un-touristy I look wearing a Chicago Bears jacket. Photo by Glyn Dewis). Dave and Glyn took me to an awesome place in Covent Garden called "Gourmet Burger Kitchen" for lunch. Yummy burger, and lots of laughs, and then we set out to find a Starbucks so I could charge my iPhone. (Above: That's Glyn and I…

    Hi. My name is Scott, and I'm a JPEG shooter. I wanted to step up and make this shocking admission after I read this comment (from reader Tom Bruno) on my blog post from Friday (link): Great shots, Scott! I’m green with envy, not just at how good your shots are, also that you get passes to shoot from the sidelines. But I am shocked — Shocked! — that you shot in JPEG. I know. Imagine how much better they would have looked had I shot in Raw. ;-) True Confessions OK, truth be known, I only shoot in JPEG on one single occassion: when I'm shooting sports. However, I'm not alone. Most of the professional sports photographers I've talked with shoot in JPEG as well, because when it comes to sports, JPEG offers a number of advantages to the sports shooter: (1) More…

    This is one of those things you just kind of stumble upon, and think to yourself, "Hey, that looks kinda cool," but you're not sure why (well, now I know why, but I didn't when I first found it). The idea for this came to me while I'm working in Lightroom one day. I normally work in a view called "Fit" which fits your entire image inside the center preview area, with a bit of gray canvas area around it (as seen above). But for some reason, on this particular day I had my View set to Fill (so your image fills the entire center preview window, as seen above). Probably did it by accident. Normally, when I want to focus on just the photo, without all the distractions of Lightroom's panels, I press Shift-Tab, which hides the top, bottom and side panels from…

    I loved doing this interview, because the Interviewer (Sophia Betz) asked some really great questions. We went into stuff like: Q. What do you find is interesting to talk to photographers about these days in terms of new technologies that didn’t exist even three or five years ago? Q. What tips do you have for photographers branching out into video? Q. When you’re out talking to photographers or taking photos, how do you define success in an image? Q. For first-timers to Photoshop World like myself, what advice would you give? Q. Do you have any other advice for up-and-coming photographers? And a bunch more. You can read it right now right here.

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