Category Archives Photoshop

livestream

Greeting from San Francisco, where tonight NAPP (the National Assn. of Photoshop Professionals) and Adobe are hosting a special party to celebrate Photoshop’s 20th Anniversary, and we’re broadcasting the whole event LIVE on the Web, and you’re invited!!!

You’ll see live Photoshop tricks from:

  • Dave Cross
  • Matt Kloskowski
  • RC Concepcion
  • Corey Barker
  • Julieanne Kost
  • Terry White
  • Russell Brown
  • Johnny L
  • and Yours Truly

Along with some “Surprise Guests.” :)

I hope you’ll join us tonight, no matter where you are in the world. It’s going to be an incredible night, and I wouldn’t be surprised if you guys saw a sneak peek of some Photoshop ‘things’ NOBODY has ever seen before!

Don’t miss it (it’s at 7:30 Pacific Time tonight!).

It’ll be broadcast on this page right here.

See you then!

-Scott

20yrposter

I’ve got a few more details for you about the Live Webcast of the big party/presentation/Photoshop love-fest happening this Thursday night (the 18th) in San Francisco celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Photoshop (if you hadn’t heard about it, here’s the link).

Anyway, here’s what I know so far:

(1) You sign up here (it’s free): http://www.photoshopuser.com/photoshop20th

(2) The Live Webcast starts at 7:30 pm Pacific Time (10:30 EST).

(3) There are some VERY special guests making an appearance that night.

(4) Matt, Dave Cross, Corey, RC, and I will all be on stage showing cool Photoshop stuff, as well as Adobe’s Julieanne Kost, Terry White, Russell Brown, and Adobe VP John Loiacono.

(5) That’s all I know. At least now anyway. Tomorrow, I may know more but hey, ya never know.

That’s it gang. I hope you can join us, because it’s shaping up to be an incredible night of fun/learning and Photoshop stuff galore!

tone1

Thanks to everybody who shared their views on the HDR issue last Friday (link). When it comes to HDR, it seems like most folks are on one side or the other, with very little middle ground—-you either like it or you really, really hate it.

One comment posted by a reader named Cory really stuck out to me. It’s short and sweet, but says volumes.

repsonse

The biggest trigger point for most commenters seemed to be the amount or style of HDR tonemapping applied to a photo, and they seemed to feel that the over-processing was strictly to hide bad photographic technique.

So, if a photographer creates an HDR photo, and even if they over-process it, does that somehow instantly mean that they’re now a bad photographer?

Not everybody that uses over-the-top HDR effects uses them as a crutch. They may just like they way it looks—plain and simple, and the photo they tone mapped may have been a strong photo without the processing, but they just like it better with the effect. Is that wrong?

Somebody I talked with this weekend about Friday’s post posed a really fascinating question, totally on the other side of the gamut from what I just wrote:

“If a photographer took a photo, and they looked at it on their camera’s LCD and thought it wasn’t a very good photo. But then they were able to add an effect to it in Photoshop (or whatever) that turned it into what a lot of people then thought was a good photo, is that a bad thing? At the end of the day, they created a photo that people like. What’s the harm in that?”

I mean, we all take a bad photo or two now and then, but the fact that the photographer knew a process that turned that boring photo into an interesting photo, is that all that bad?

Apparently, for a lot of people, it is.

test

In honor of Photoshop’s 20th Anniversary (this Thursday, Feb. 18th), the gang here at NAPP (the National Assn. of Photoshop Professionals) put together a Photoshop Trivia Quiz on Photoshop’s history, what features were added when, and stuff like that.

The quiz is just for fun, of course, but it’s harder than you might think (I did “OK” on it, meaning I passed, but I didn’t do well enough to brag about my score).

If you’ve got a couple of minutes, click this link to take the quiz and see how you do.

(NOTE: if you do take the quiz and get a great score—don’t post a comment with your score. It’ll only make me feel even worse). ;-)

hdr2

A week or so ago, by buddy Dave Cross had a great post called “The Debate about HDR”, which talked about the strong feelings photographers have about HDR, both pro and con (here’s the link). But what really caught my attention was a comment posted by one of his readers, because I’ve heard other photographers say the same thing, but none as succinctly as this reader’s comment:

“I too use to love it…now, not so much…and for some reason, once I quickly identify the HDR effect, my opinion of the picture drops a notch.”

This reminds me of something my teenage son does. If it hears a song on the radio from one of his favorite new bands, and I tell him, “Oh, that’s a remake of an old song from the 70s or 80s—no matter how much he liked that song—it now drops a notch in his book.

So, what is it about HDR that, once identified, that kind of taints the overall photo for these photographers?

Is it that they feel like it’s “Cheating” to use HDR, because it transforms the photo so magically? I have to admit that I’ve taken an HDR shot or two that, when I looked at the original base exposure, the shot was totally unimpressive, but once I applied lots of HDR Tone Mapping, and then take it back through Camera Raw for the final tweaking, it looks much more interesting. (the HDR photo above is courtesy of istockphoto.com /photographer cinoby).

Personally, to me, HDR is an effect like any other effect. It’s a strong effect, but it’s still just an effect, and I totally understand that when it comes to visual effects, you either like them or you don’t (especially if they’re overdone). But I think there’s something more going on here, because creating a duotone is an effect but nobody seems to complain about duotones.

One of my photographer friends once said, “The photographers who don’t like HDR are the ones who don’t know how to do HDR—just like people who complain about the use of Photoshop in photography—those are people who aren’t very good at Photoshop. You don’t hear HDR experts complaining about HDR, just like you don’t hear Photoshop experts saying “There’s too much Photoshop!”

I’m not at all saying that’s the case, but I’ve heard and read that argument a dozen times or more. So what is it? What is it that makes people so emotional about HDR? When you learn that an image has been “HDR’d” does it taint your opinion of the shot? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

kelbytv2

About a month ago we launched KelbyTV.com, a new home for all the video shows we produce each week, so folks would have a central location to find all our shows right online.

Last week I mentioned that Dave Cross has launched his own new weekly Podcast called “Ask Dave” and now NAPP News (hosted by Larry Becker)  has joined the channel.

The full list of weekly shows on KelbyTV.com include:

  • Photoshop User TV
  • D-Town TV
  • Layers TV
  • Lightroom Killer Tips
  • Photoshop Killer Tips
  • Ask Dave
  • NAPP News

Of course, you can subscribe to all of these shows using Apple’s iTunes, and watch them right on your iPhone, iPod Touch, etc.

Here’s a direct link (make sure you catch the new episode of D-Town, with special in-studio guest Joe McNally).

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