Category Archives Photoshop


Well, now that Photoshop World Vegas is in the history books, I guess it’s time to get back to “real life” and the ol’ blog-a-roo. In that spirt, here’s what’s up:

Update on the New “Photoshop User TV
We’re just about finished building-out the new studio, with its totally new look, and new way-cool format for the show, and in just a couple of weeks, we’ll be launching our new season of Photoshop User TV, with loads of new Photoshop tutorials and tricks (and more content than ever!). We’re just getting so close now I thought I’d better check in and let you know it’s moving along really well. We’ve been running some “mini-shows” during the construction phases, but we’re almost there. Also, Matt Kloskowski and I are launching a new digital photography show as well (the one that’s taking the place of D-Town), and it’ll be up and running right after we get the new and improved Photoshop User TV on the air. Lots of really cool stuff coming up!

Incredible Sports Portraits from Photographer Paul Aresu
Somehow I came across the site of sports portrait photographer Paul Aresu and OMG this guy’s stuff just rocks! Great photography and great post production all the way around. Even if sports doesn’t interest you on any level, his images will. Just incredible work! (here’s the link).

You’ve got to read this article on ethical cropping
I found this New York Times essay, by photographer David Hume Kennerly absolutely fascinating, and if you’ve ever had an ethical debate about what can be done in Photoshop, then read this article about what can be done with just a simple crop. Here’s the link.

My Lightroom Tour is in the Detroit Area next week
I’ll be in Livonia, Michigan next Friday for my “Lightroom 2 Live Tour” and it’s the first time I’ve brought my Lightroom Workshop to Michigan, and I’m really excited about it (We already have nearly 350 photographers signed up), and I hope you’ll join me for a day that’ll change the way your manage and edit your photos—-guaranteed! Here’s the link with details.

That’s about all for today. We’ve got LOTS of cool stuff in the works, so keep an eye here on the blog. It’s going to be a wild 4th quarter for sure!!!! Have a great one!


I certainly don’t think so (I’d rather see airlines regulated as to how they treat their passengers), but according to an article in Yahoo’s Shine magazine, a governing body in the UK thinks things have gotten so out-of-hand that maybe photo retouching should be regulated.

Here’s what the Shine article said:

“In what’s poised to be the biggest uproar yet over the ongoing issue of Photoshopping in mass media, members of the British Parliament are calling for a ban on digitally altering ads aimed at children under 16, and disclosure of these modifications in ads aimed at adults, reports Jezebel.

Here’s the link to their article to read more.

My video crew was on hand at my recent Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks seminar in Orlando, Florida, and right before the 2nd session kicked off, I did a quick little “howdy,” but beyond that, they included a behind-the-scenes look at the seminar, so if you’ve never been to one of our one-day workshops, take a look at the video clip below for a quick glimpse at the day.

Just a quick heads-up: we have well over 600 people already signed up for my seminar on Friday, and so we’re totally sold out for this workshop.

Thanks to everybody who signed up—we’re gonna have a wild day!!!! See you guys in Orlando!


P.S. My Lightroom 2 Live Tour is coming to Detroit on Friday, October 16th, and then my last Lightroom 2 Tour of the year will be in Tampa, Florida on Monday, November 16th. Here’s the link for more details or to reserve your seat now!


Yesterday I found out that over 500 people are already signed up for “Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks” one-day workshop in Orlando, Florida (held next Friday—one week from today), but somebody’s missing. You!

It’s not too late to register—follow this link, where you’ll find out the full class schedule, and how to reserve your seat (It’s only $99, or $79 if you’re a NAPP member) for a day of nothing but the latest Photoshop special effects (these are real commercial effects—the same ones you see in print, on the Web, in ads, on TV, and in Hollywood—-techniques you can really use in your own everyday work).

Hope I’ll see you there next Friday—we’re going to have a blast!


I got an email yesterday from a reader of one of my books, and it’s an email I’ve gotten dozens of times before, and it always puts me in an uneasy position. Uneasy enough, and yet common enough, that I wanted to share it with you guys.

He had read something in my book “The Photoshop Book for Digital Photographers” where I said to do something a particular way, but then he found someone on a Web site somewhere who said to do it differently (in fact, they said to do it the exact opposite of what I said in my book). So, basically, he was emailing me to ask me to defend what I written in my book. Ugh.

As I’ve done dozens of times in the past, I set out to write a lengthy explanation of why what I had stated in the book was correct, and give even more detail and background than was already provided in the book, but the more I thought about it, the more I realized (from previous exchanges exactly like this over the years) that this was just going to start a long back and forth, and that in the end, because he had doubts (based on what he read on some Web site) he was going to believe what he wanted to believe anyway.

So instead, without being a smart-alec in any way, I politely let him know that what I wrote in the book is actually how I feel on the topic, so he already knows that’s what I believe, but I also told him (I’m paraphrasing here):

On the Web you’ll find conflicting information on every topic; whether it’s medical advice or how to hang a picture frame; from how to play the Blues on guitar, to how to cook spaghetti bolognese. It really comes down to you making a decision about which advice to follow. You have to choose which person’s explanation, theory, or technique sounds more “right” or makes more sense to you, and try that and see what you think. :)

In the end, I’ve realized how important it is to find sources that I can trust on a wide variety of topics. I usually look for experts on the topic, and once I find someone who makes sense to me, and then (this is important), I take their advice and try it for myself and it works for me, then that becomes my go-to person for that topic.

That doesn’t mean I ignore the rest of the world, but if I read something conflicting, I take it with a grain of salt. For example, if Joe McNally tells me something about off-camera flash—I know he’s speaking from experience, and I take his advice and run with it. If I read in a forum, or even in a book something that flies in the face of what Joe says, that doesn’t mean Joe is necessarily wrong; it just means somebody else does it differently, and that may work for them.

In Photoshop, it’s the same thing. There are so many different ways to do things, and so many of us teaching how to use Photoshop, that you’re going hear and see different techniques that we found work for us, and we pass those on to our students. For example, there are a dozen (probably more) books written on color correction in Photoshop. Which one is right? They all work (you don’t ever see a color correction book where the correction looks worse than the original), but again, you have to choose which experts techniques makes the most sense to you (for me, it’s Dan Margulis; to me he’s the bottom line on color, but you’ll find others who disagree). That’s OK, what I’ve learned from Dan works for me.

But finding an expert who makes sense to you, whether its about Photoshop or how to drive a race car, is only one part of this. It’s perhaps even more important to try this person’s techniques yourself and see if it actually translates to what you were looking for. Does it actually work the way you were hoping?

The person who wrote me that email could have tested both theories (the one outlined in my book, and the one he read somewhere on the Web) in less time than it took to find my email address and compose that email. He would have known right then and there if what I said was right, or what he read on the Web was right. That’s what’s so great about Photoshop. Testing is nearly instant. It’s not like medicine (where you have to wait to see if you got it right, and a lot more is riding on the line).

I guess the point of all this is that at some point, you’re going to have to trust somebody, but beyond that once you do find somebody whose opinions you trust; if at all possible, try them out yourself. See if their techniques/advice/theory works for you, and if you’re getting the results you hoped you would. Oh yeah, that, and don’t write an author asking if what they wrote in the book is what they really meant. I doubt they’ll say, “Oh that….oh, I was just making up stuff for the book. I really think something completely different.” ;-)