Category Archives Photoshop

https://youtu.be/nSmPbgP0GK0

It’s actually two little things to do; the first one is a no-brainer, the second one (the main one) you’d kinda have to know the secret handshake to make it work, but chances are it’s going to fix whatever is messing with your copy of Photoshop or Lightroom, and get you back up and running right.

It’s short, sweet, and to the point. Hope you find it helpful.

Hope I get to meet you at my seminar here today in Seattle, or on Friday in Portland. 

Have an great Tuesday everybody. :)

Best,

-Scott

The reason I’m embarrassed is – this Photoshop portrait retouching tip for quickly reducing shiny hot spots on your subject’s face, was sent to me by John Weigley, a reader of my books – but it’s not the fact that he sent me the tip (I absolutely love it when readers send me cool tips. In fact, I shared another one from a reader today over at LightroomKillerTips), but what I’m embarrassed about is that I just found his message this weekend. That doesn’t sound all that bad, until you realize he sent it to me in 2004. Ack!

So, before I go into the video (below), I owe John a very, very belated thanks for sharing this tip with me, so I could share it today (some 12 years later) with you.

https://youtu.be/9cjOtVQvSPw

Hope you find that helpful (and thanks again to John for sharing the tip in the first place).

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Wanna spend three days immersing yourself in learning Photoshop inside and out? Come and join us out in Las Vegas, July 19-21st at the Photoshop World 2016 Conference. You’ll learn more in three days than you have in three years. Here’s the link with details – get your tickets now and save $100 bucks. 

Mornin’ everybody. Here’s another one of those hidden little things that Adobe snuck into Photoshop CC kind of under the radar in one of those periodic CC feature updates.

Believe it or not this one was added back in 2014 but it’s hard to find someone that actually realizes it’s there. It’s a built-in filter for creating all sorts of frames around an image. Here’s how it works:

photoframe1

Go under the Filter menu, under Render, and choose Picture Frame. If you just said, “What?! …Picture Frame?! Where did that come from…” you’re not alone.

photoframe2

Here’s the Frame window. From the frame pop-up menu you can choose 40-something different frame types from the awesome to the absurd. The more traditional looking frames are toward the bottom of the menu, like this art frame shown above. Depending on which frame style you choose there are a bunch of sliders to tweak it to your heart’s content.

photoframe3a

I create a new blank layer before I open the filter, so I can resize the frame after it renders using Free Transform. I also added a soft drop shadow here just to add some depth.

I hope that started your week off with something new to mess around with in Photoshop, here’s wishing you your best week of the year (so far). :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Hey, if you’re a photographer in the Portland, Oregon area – I’ll be there next week (on Thursday I believe) with my Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (reloaded!) seminar. Hope you can come out and join me. 

https://youtu.be/ovS3OhtJ6ks

Hey gang – it’s Friday (yay!) I’m back with another “Photoshop Finishing Move” that picks up right where my brand new “Start to Finish in Lightroom” (that I posted over at LightroomKillerTips.com just today – here’s the link), left off.

This one is a technique I use to take the “edge” off sharp images, and I get asked about this “look” a lot (the question usually is “How is it that some of your images have a soft look but they’re still really sharp?” Well, this is how I do it (no plug-ins, no-presets – just simple Photoshop stuff).

Hope you find that helpful, and here’s wishing you a fantastic weekend! :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you’re a KelbyOne member, just a heads up: we are taking the site down tonight at 11:30 pm EDT for a scheduled maintenance. It should be back up Saturday morning. We’re doing this maintenance to help give our members a better, more stable experience (we’re moving to an awesome new server platform) and it will bring us all lots of happy goodness and love, but to get the love, we have to do this maintenance thing first, so hang in there with us – a better experience is on its way. Thanks for your patience (and for the love. We all need love). :)

Happy Friday, everybody. OK, before we look at this tutorial, you should probably look at this tutorial. It’s one I wrote today over at the other site I write – LightroomKillertips.com and it’s on how I went from the flat out-of-camera original image to the image we’re going to do a finishing move upon in the video you see below. So, if you want to go see how I got to here (without any presets, plug-ins or HDR), here’s that link again.

OK, now onto a Photoshop Finishing move I use often on interior shots like this (it’s super easy to do!).

https://youtu.be/PjYXxm-zNmQ

Hope you found that helpful.

One more thing!
If you missed our Photoshop World Alumni-only Webcast last night, we’re rebroadcasting it at this link (if you haven’t been before, wait for our public “Here’s what Photoshop World” webcast is – this one was just for people who have already been, so we only cover all the cool new things, and not the things new attendees would want to know. Thanks.

Have a great weekend everybody!

Best,

-Scott

Howdy folks — happy Tuesday!

Adobe has been rolling out a stream of new features for Photoshop CC over the past couple of years, and even I sometimes lose track of all the things they’ve added, so I’m not surprised so many folks didn’t catch this one when it was rolled out (this one had been on my wish list for about 20 years).

It’s the ability to completely customize Photoshop’s toolbar, so you only see the tools you actually use (and hide the rest). It’s super easy to do. Here’s how:

toolbar1

STEP ONE: Go under the Edit menu, and near the very bottom choose Toolbar. This brings up the Customize Toolbar window you see above. The left column lists all the tools in Photoshop’s toolbar. If you see one you don’t use, just drag and drop it to the column on the right to hide it from the toolbar. The good news is — you can choose to have three little dots appear at the bottom of the toolbar which gives you access to all those tools you chose to hide, ya know…just in case. :)

Also, below the left column are a row of icons of features that appear at bottom of the toolbar, like the Quickmask button, and screen mode toggle buttons — you can even choose to each any or all of those.

STEP TWO: Click done and you’re done! Of course, if you ever change your mind and want to get back to the original default set of tools — just come back to this same Customize Toolbar window and click on the “Restore Defaults” button near the top right side.

toolbar2

BONUS TOOLBAR TIP:
By default you get a single column toolbar, but back “in the old days” (when dinosaurs ruled the earth), Photoshop actually had a two-column toolbar like the one you see above right. If you ever get in the mood to go all “old school” on us, just click the little double-arrow at the top left of the single toolbar to switch it to the double-column toolbar. You get five extra points if you play the song “Turn up the Radio” by Autograph right before you click that button. Doing that doesn’t actually affect Photoshop in any way, but will cause you, momentarily, to totally rock out and sign along. This is not a bad thing.

Hope you find that helpful. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Tomorrow, at 4pm on “The Grid” we’re airing a special “Live from the UK” tour from “The Photography Show” in Birmingham (it’s not actually live because we taped it at the show, but it was live when we did it, which is the kind of explanation a presidential candidate might give to any given question. I’m not one, but I’ve seen a lot of TV commercials for them). 😉

 

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