Category Archives Photoshop

Happy Friday, everybody! Today I’m going to share five very short trailers (each around a minute or less) for online classes you can watch this weekend over at KelbyOne.com, including three classes from me.

BTW: If you’re not already a KelbyOne member, you can watch all five of these classes (and all the rest for that matter), for $19.99 (the cost of a one-month membership). Well, truth be told, you could just sign up for a 10-day free trial membership and watch them all for free (but don’t tell ’em I told ya). ;-)

Here they are:

https://youtu.be/clkUtMJBsho

Above: Location Lighting
That’s my class on location lighting – shot in four difference places for four different types of shoots. I’m using the Elinchrom ELB-400 battery pack and flash, but as many people online have said, you don’t need that set-up to learn a lot from this class.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class

https://youtu.be/2XMCPvEtj04

Above: Shooting Fashion on Location with Frank Doorhof
This is an awesome class from Dutch fashion photographer Frank Doorhof, shot on location in Amsterdam, on how to shoot, pose, and work with models. Frank rocks!

Here’s the link to Frank’s full online class at KelbyOne

https://youtu.be/wh0vt4DKub4

Above: How to photograph and create fun Holiday Cards
In this brand-new class RC shows you how to make way cooler Christmas Cards this year by not only creating the images yourself (instead of using the Mall Santa), but using Photoshop to create something really clever, really unique, and something your friends will be talking about.

Here’s the link to the full online class on KelbyOne

https://youtu.be/YuGYmgc8WZ8

Above: How to design Holiday Cards in Adobe Illustrator (with Pete Collins)
I know I said it’s only 5-trailers, but this one kind of goes hand-in-hand with the previous one since these are Holiday-specific classes. Pete shows you how incredible easy it is to create really clever custom holiday cards in Adobe Illustrator (and if you’ve never used Illustrator, but you’re an Adobe Creative Cloud subscriber, this is your chance to start using it).

Here’s the link to the full online class at KelbyOne

 

https://youtu.be/5wHnAg3ocPM

Above: Location Lite: High end look – low cost budget
I called this class “Location Lite” because the goal was to make it look like we shot on locations, but we really did it on the cheap and indoors, keeeping our budget at $300 (including the hot shoe flash itself, the modifier, and even the background). I’m hearing from so many people who have fallen in love with this class – you’ll dig it.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class.

 

https://youtu.be/lFzD3xOG4iI

Above: Retouching Brides
If you’re a wedding photographer, this one’s definitely for you, but even if you just do portraits, you’ll pick up lots of Photoshop retouching techniques in this class that you can use in your portrait work.

Here’s the link to the full KelbyOne online class.

There ya have it – lots to watch this weekend, and hope you learn a lot. :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Make sure you check out my portrait lighting “fix” tutorial today over on LighroomKillerTips.com – I show how to take a technique we normally use for Landscape photos and repurpose it for portraits (see below).

portrait3

 

Last night Adobe released a ton of new updates for users in the Adobe Creative Cloud and Photoshop was among the apps that got a good amount of changes to it.  These features were things that we got to see a sneak peek at Adobe Max – but it is so nice to see that they are out as fast as they could.

update_creative_cloud

We are excited about the new features – so much so that we have them all set up in our Photoshop CC 2015.1 Learning Center! Our own Corey Barker takes you through all of the features and gets you up to speed on all of the new additions in no time at all!  We also have all of the updates in one spot there.

I believe there is no better time to be an Adobe Creative Cloud user.  Whether using the Creative Cloud Photography Plan or the Full Creative Cloud subscription, the amount of features you’re getting from Adobe is wonderful.

That’s right! It’s Friday and you know what that means – It’s “Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks” Friday!

The collage you see above is only one part of today’s trick, which has a whole bunch of steps, but every single one of them is easy, and you’ll learn all sorts of cool things along the way, so don’t let the amount of steps dissuade you. By the way — the US Military makes loads and loads of images available for download for free — just do a Google search and you’ll find about a bazillion to use to practice along. OK, here we go:

(more…)

Hi Gang: Sorry for the late post today (I’m still up in NYC – supposed to have gone home last night but the weather didn’t cooperate), but better late than never (at least, I hope that’s what you’re thinking). Anyway, today’s is a ad I was in a Web banner for a test-drive of some Olympus cameras, but of course as a Canon shooter I don’t have any photos of Olympus cameras, so I used a shot of a 5D Mark III (photo by Brad Moore) and it’ll do the trick.

NOTE: If you want to follow along using the same image I used here: here’s the link (right click on it to download).

There are actually three cool techniques in this tutorial
So it’s definitely worth giving it a try. Here goes: (more…)

OK, it’s official – I’m making every Friday here on my blog, “Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks Friday” where I’ll share a simple, hopefully helpful, and certainly fun Photoshop special effect — the type of effects you see in ads, on the Web, in banners, etc.

This one I’m showing you today I especially like because I’m showing how I created a perspective text effect for the Facebook promos I did for my last seminar tour (my “Shoot like a Pro Tour”), but I’m using the date of the next stop in my “all new” tour (my “Reloaded!” seminar), so it’s both a Photoshop trick, and a subtle plug of my upcoming Phoenix live seminar stop on Tuesday, September 22nd (like the way I worked that in there?).

Anyway, here’s how it goes (and it uses a filter a lot of folks haven’t tried, the Vanishing Point filter, which is designed to do the math for you on creating perspective effects).

D&Dsign1

STEP ONE: Open the image you want to add a perspective text effect to in Photoshop, like the road sign shown here (it’s a stock image – you can get one like this to practice on for a buck at dollarphotoclub.com).

D&Dsign2

STEP TWO: Get the Type tool and create your type. In this case, I’m trying to make it look like a road sign so I used Helvetica Bold, and I left lots of leading between the lines like they do in real road signs.

D&Dsign3

STEP THREE: Go to the Layers panel; hold the Command key on Mac (the Ctrl key on Windows), and click directly on the “T” thumbnail icon to put a selection around your type (as seen above). Now press Command-C (Windows: Ctrl-C)  to copy that selected text into memory. Now you can delete that Type layer by dragging it into the Trash can at the bottom of the Layers panel. You’ll want your perspective text to appear on its own layer, so add a new black layer above your sign layer, and then press Command-D (Windows: Ctrl-D) to Deselect your text.

D&Dsign4

STEP FOUR: Go under the Filter menu and choose Vanishing Point to bring up the Vanishing Point window, seen above. Click on the 2nd tool from the top (it’s called the “Create Plane” tool). You’re going to click it once just inside each corner of the sign (it works kinda like the Polygonal Lasso does, but with a rubber-band effect, dragging out a straight line as you move your cursor. It just takes four-clicks — one in each corner until you create the full four-cornered shape, and it applies a blue grid like you see here, to let you know the shape you created worked. NOTE: If you see a yellow grid instead, that’s a warning that’s it’s probably not exactly right, so you might want to futz with it a bit, moving your cursor slightly one way or the other until it turns blue. It the grid turns red, and the grid disappears, so you just see the outside border, that’s letting you know that you’re way off, and it’s not going to work. But never fear, this filter helps you out pretty well and chances are you won’t have a problem.

D&Dsign5

STEP FIVE: Press Command-V (Windows: Ctrl-V) to Paste your copied text into Vanishing Point. It’ll appear just floating there doing nothing special, up in the left corner, as seen here.

D&Dsign6

STEP SIX: Click your cursor inside your text and drag it down over your grid and all of a sudden it just snaps into the grid with the proper perspective automatically applied, (as seen here). The text here is a little too big for the sign (it’s cutting off the bottom of the letters in the bottom row), but we can fix that easy enough in the next step.

D&Dsign7

STEP SEVEN: Switch to the sixth tool down in the toolbar on the right — that’s the Transform tool (shown selected here). It kind of works like Free Transform, so hold the Shift key (to keep things proportional); grab a corner point and drag inward until the text fits on the size without any problem, as seen here. You can reposition your text anywhere within that grid (moving it up/down/left/right) using that same tool.  When it looks good to you, click the OK button in the top right corner, and it applies the perspective effect to your text, and renders it on that blank layer you created right before you open the Vanishing Point window.

D&Dsign8

STEP EIGHT: Now you can see the text added to the sign with the proper perspective effect (the letters are larger on the left and get smaller as they move to the right side of the sign proportionally, like they would in real life). Lastly, we want the letter to not look so “Added after the fact” and a great, simple trick for that is simply to lower this layer’s opacity a bit so the letters look more like they’re on the sign (in real life, those letters wouldn’t be 100% solid white — the ink would have bled into the sign, and been washed out a bit by the sun), so I always lowered the Opacity for these signs to 83% (as seen here).

Now that you know this technique, on some level doesn’t it make you subconsciously want to come spend the day with me in just about three weeks learning some really cool, really intriguing, and really inspirational photography stuff? It does? Great! Then just follow this link to sign up and we’ll spend the whole day together on that Tuesday (I wish all my effects worked this well as a seminar promo). ;-)

Hope you all have a great weekend. I’m shooting the Bucs/Browns game tomorrow night (sad to hear Johnny Manziel probably won’t be taking any snaps due to soreness in his arm — I was hoping to get some “Johnny Football” shots). It’ll still be a blast, even shooting in the Florida heat (and it’s crazy hot here right now), but it’s still football, so I’ll be there with a big smile and a long lens or two). :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. We just released my “Retouching Brides” online training class. If you shoot weddings, I think you’ll really find it helpful. You can watch it right now, online for just $19.95 – here’s the link –  and after you’re done, you can watch all my other classes too, because that $19.95 gets you a full month of unlimited access to the entire library of all our online photography, Photoshop, and Lightroom classes (not just my classes – all of ’em!). Just sayin’- that’s a pretty awesome deal. :)

 

Here’s a really popular, super simple, technique for creating ad backgrounds (you see this look a lot in print ads and online banners. The one we’re going to recreate is a print ad I saw for the Modern Shoe Hospital), but there’s an added super-handy trick inside of this, and it’s how to keep the original drop shadow from a placed product shot on a white background. It’s cooler than it sounds. Here goes:

Down1

STEP ONE: Open a new document and fill the background with a solid color. This doc is around 8″x10″ at 72 ppi resolution.

Down2smSTEP TWO: Create a new blank layer, then get the Elliptical Marque tool and create a large oval-shaped section (like the one you see here). Now set your Foreground color to white, then press Option-Delete (PC: Alt-Backspace) to fill your oval with White (as seen here). Now you can Deselect by pressing Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D on PC).

Down3smSTEP THREE: Now you’re going to blur the living daylights out of it. Go under the Filter menu, under Blur and choose Gaussian Blur. Enter 80 pixels and click OK (you can use a lot higher amount on a high-res image. This is just 72 ppi). The goal is just to make it look really blurry like what you see here.

Down4smSTEP FOUR: now that our background is done, open the product shot you want on this background and copy and paste it into your background document and position it in the center (as seen here).

Down5smSTEP FIVE: Our goal here is to remove the white background yet keep the original drop shadow. This is easier than it sounds. First, duplicate the product shot layer (the sneaker layer) and hide that layer from view by clicking on the eye icon to the left of the layer. Now click on the original sneaker layer. Hold the Shift key then start pressing the “+” key on your keyboard. Each time you press Shift-+ it toggles you through the different Layer Blend Modes. At this point, don’t worry at all about what the sneaker looks like — we’re only concerned about the drop shadow at this point, so keep toggling through the blend modes until you find one where the shadow looks natural (in this case, it was the blend mode Linear Burn). The shadow looks pretty good, but the front and back of the sneaker are white, so they’re letting the teal background show through quite a bit, but that’s why we created that 2nd sneaker layer.

Down6smSTEP SIX: Now make the top layer (the duplicate sneaker layer) visible again. Hold the Option key (PC: Alt-key) and at the bottom of the Layers panel click on the Layer Mask button (it’s the third icon from the left). This adds a black Layer Mask over your original sneaker image (so, the layer is still there, you just can’t see it because it’s hidden behind that black mask). Now get the Brush took; make sure your foreground color is set to white; choose a small soft-edged brush tip (from the Brush Picker up in the Options Bar), and paint over the front and back of the sneaker to reveal the original sneaker in those areas (as seen here where I’m painting over the front of the sneaker. You can see the original sneaker being painted in).

Down7smSTEP SEVEN: To finish things off, just add your text headline, your logo (with a slight drop shadow from the fx menu at the bottom of the Layers panel in this case, since it’s really hard to see that white text over that white glowing oval), and you’re done.

It’s Down. It’s Dirty. It’s Done!

Hope you all have an awesome weekend, and we’ll see ya back here on Monday when we’re all not so cheery. ;-)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Let me know how you feel about this Photoshop Down & Dirty tricks. This is the third one I’ve done in the past two weeks, and I want to make sure you’re digging this type of stuff. If it’s too far away from what I normally do here, let me know. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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