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  • Category Archives Reviews

    My one complaint with my new Retina Display MacBook Pro is that it no longer has a locking hole drilled in the side of the laptop itself, so you can no longer secure your laptop with a Kensington security lock and cable (like you could with other MacBook Pro models). So far, after searching around the only simple solution seems to be this new clear plastic skin from http://www.macLocks.com which lets you attached a cable lock. Here's how it works: You remove five screws from the bottom of your MacBook Pro, then (using the supplied screws and screwdriver) you attach this very lightweight clear, plastic "skin" to the bottom of your laptop (it has ventilation slats), and it has special locking mount in the back right corner (seen in the photo below). I tried it at the Bucs/Chargers game on Sunday and it worked well (and the…

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    Tuesday afternoon I was walking by Kevin Agren's office (he's our Director of Sales), and he asks if I ever got a chance to try the Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom he had gotten us as a loaner. I told him I had actually tried it out on a shoot I did back in December for an upcoming book (one of the images from that shoot is shown above), and that I really liked it, (even more so after I looked up the price----around $725, whereas most of the f/2.8 glass I had been using for the past few years was more in the $1,800 to $2,300 range, which any way you look at it, is a lot for a lens). The shot you see above was taken with that Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8, and during the shoot I switched back and forth between it and…

    Hey, before I mention Terry's review, I have to stop right now and give a big thanks to Jamie Smith for yesterday's totally awesome Guest Blog. I loved it!!!! (and I think Jamie has a second career in writing just waiting in the wings). I loved the insights he gave into working for Jay, and I especially dug the Jay Trivia. What a perfect way to kick off our series of Guest Blogs by assistants. :) Now, back to the reason for this post: Terry White (over at the popular Terry's Tech Blog), just posted a review of Westcott's new Green Screen kit (it's a crazy inexpensive way to light and shoot people, or objects for that matter, that you want to composite on a different background in Photoshop). Basically, it makes your Photoshop compositing job that much easier (of course, you can use…

    Last week Mark Astmann from Bogen Imaging came by our studios, and showed us one of the coolest, and most anticipated, new battery-powered strobe systems ever, and well...you've just gotta watch the video below to see what all the fuss is about (Note: this is the same kit that Joe McNally was using for his shot of the diver in the water last week at his workshop in St. Lucia). UPDATE: I just learned that the first shipment of these is due to hit B&H photo any day now, and they're acceptings orders right now. Here's the link to the "S" head two-head kit I talked about on the video, but you can find all the Quadra gear there by searching for "Ranger Quadra."

    I'm calling this a "First Look" review because I've only gotten one opportunity to really work with this pack, but since I did use it out in the field (I did an on-location shoot for a book project), I wanted to give you my first impressions. The Problem If you wanted to take studio lightning on location, you could do it but there two problems: 1. You had to buy special strobe heads that were designed to work with on-location battery packs 2. Good quality location kits are VERY expensive (you were lucky to get a decent single head and a battery pack for around $1,200). The Dream Use your own existing regular studio strobes and take them on location. Unfortunately, monoblocks (also called monolights) are strobes that are designed to be plugged right into the wall like any other appliance, so they don't…

    I've been wanting to try out Lastolite's new Kickerlite ever since I read about it back around the Photokina time frame, and while doing some shoots for my Digital Photography book, Volume 3 , I finally got a chance to use it, and I have to say, it's surprisingly sweet (and a lot better than I thought it was going to be by just looking at it and reading the description of what it's supposed to do). So, here's how it works: it sits on the floor in front of your subject (as seen above---photo by Brad Moore) and it's in the shape of a wedge aiming up at your subject (kind of like a vocal monitor for all you rock heads out there) and it kind of looks like a softbox. There's a horizontal H-shaped pole and flash bracket in the back where…

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