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  • Category Archives Techniques

    I finally got around to covering a question that I get asked so often from readers here on the blog, and that is: "What is the difference between off camera flash (like a Nikon SB-800 or SB-900, or a Canon 580 EXII), and a Studio Strobe?" If I have time, I sometimes answer people back with a direct email, but I've gotten this question so many times, I haven't been able to answer them all. So, I thought I'd put together an example to show you my typical response to the question, which is purely my own opinion on the subject. What I usually say is something along the lines of: "Whether you use a small off-camera flash, or a studio strobe, what you get is a bright flash of white light aiming toward your subject." I know that sounds pretty simplistic, but that's…

    OK, today in Part 2 we're looking at the Post Processing I did to yesterday's image, and for that I used the new Lucis Art Pro plug-in (which I'm going to mini-review in this same post). DISCLAIMER: If you hate the Dave Hill look, or you're tired of it, or whatever...do me a favor---just skip this post. The reason I did the post in the first place is that this is the #1 most-requested technique I get from readers, and I thought I'd give it a whirl. Obviously, this was a huge mistake on my part, because apparently it just mostly made people mad at me (I don't know why it always has to come to this---it's just a Photoshop technique for goodness sakes). But since I did part one and promised to show the post-processing, I feel like I should finish it, so…

    I had so many requests last week to show how to create Photo Book layouts (like the one I did for my trip to Turkey, Greece, and Egypt), that I did three short videos for you (below), to show you how, but using different applications. The three videos are: How to create them in Apple's iPhoto How to create them in Lighroom 2 How to create them from scratch in Photoshop CS4 using Smart Objects Click on the videos to watch them. Hope this helps jump start you into making photo books, because once you start, you'll be totally hooked! The iPhoto Video: [kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/2iexUVyMRJ8" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /] The Lightroom 2 Video: [kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/t3EGSLPEYhY" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /] The Photoshop CS4 Video: [kml_flashembed movie="http://www.youtube.com/v/PTWnrGBbMM4" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /] NOTE: If you'd like to see a higher quality version of these videos, click on…

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