Category Archives Updates

This one (above) really is like a movie trailer, and I’m in a pirate suit, so I’m not quite sure what to say hereâ¦..anyway, we have a Pirate theme for the Vegas Photoshop World Conference & Expo this year, and this little trailer gives you a taste for what’s in the opening keynote movie that kicks off the three-day training event. It should be Arrrrrrrrr rated! (Sorry, I couldn’t help myself).

Anyway, Steve Nicolai, Daniel Bryant and our crew over in KelbyOne video land do some really clever, amazing, and often funny trailers for our online courses and I thought I’d share 10 of my favorite’s here (you can watch them below — they’re all pretty short — usually 30-seconds to a minute each). Here goes (in no particular order):

1. Peter Hurley’s “Mastering Headshot Photography”
I love how real Peter is throughout this trailer, but it’s the very end that just cracks me up!


2. Joe McNally – Making Great Photos in Bad Weather
This is just so Joe. Dig the Twister reference, and Joe’s inappropriate arm gesture.


3. Dave Black – High School Football Photography
Our crew did such a great taking the images Dave made during the live class and giving it a real big-time sports theme. The graphics, type and treatment are just great (and Dave’s class is killer, so it really fit).


4. Exposing HDR — What Happened to RC?
This was our first teaser trailer, andâ¦wellâ¦it’s just creepy. I wouldn’t have shot there.


5. Frank Doorhof ‘s “The Art of Dance Photography”
I love this one simply because of the shots Frank was able to pull off during this class (seen in the trailer). He is just amazing.


6. Bill’s Fortney’s “Close up: An introduction to Macro Photography”
I like the twist and reveal near the end of the trailer.


7. Bill Frake’s Environmental Sports Portraiture
Bill just flat out does some clever stuff and you get a peek at some of it in this trailer. One of my sports photography heroes.


8. Glyn Dewis’ Character Composite
Just like McNally’s trailer is so “Joe,” Glyn is just so “Glyn” in this trailer. The funny thing is, the mechanic in the trailer is a real mechanic who works right down the street from our studios.


9. Dave Black Horse Racing
I love the historic feel and look of this trailer. Really well done, and it makes you not only want to watch Dave’s class, it’s make you want to grab your camera and head to the track.


10. Tim Wallace — lighting cars with just one flash
I think what I love about this class is the final shot of the car, completely lit with one hot shoe flash, and I’m still like “dude, no way!” but yes. Way!


10.5 Matt’s Compositing Secret’s Book
OK, this technically isn’t a class, but it’s one of my all-time favorites, and one of the first one’s Steve did when he came on board with us as our trailer superhero and man he just won our hearts with this clever, funny, and really well done book trailer.

I know nothings worse that seeing a cool trailer and not being able to see the feature (or in our class, the online class), so if you want to watch any of these classes, and you’re not already a KelbyOne subscriber, you can get a free 24-hour pass and check them all out (as long as you don’t have anything planned that day, right?). Anyway, here’s the link just in case.

If you’re already a subscriber, if I were you I’d still watch all 10 — even if the topics aren’t what you normally shoot. Maybe today’s the day you fall in love with something new because these instructors are so inspiring, so amazing, and so information it just might open a whole new world for you. Hey, ya never know. :)



P.S. Tomorrow on “The Grid” it’s our “Blind Photo Critique” episode and if you’d like your 3 or 4 of your  images considered to be critiqued during tomorrow’s 4pm live show, submit your images at this link. Good luck! 

Bill Fortney’s Olympic Park
Pull on your boots and join Bill Fortney, a world renowned nature and landscape photographer, as he takes you on a journey through Olympic National Park on the majestic coast of the Pacific Northwest in his latest class, Bill Fortney’s Olympic Park. From dramatic close-ups to breathtaking landscapes, and from sun-up to sun-down, Bill will walk you through each step of his process to get the shot, all the while discussing the gear he is using and sharing many valuable tips along the way.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNallyMatt Kloskowski, or RC Concepcion? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Nov 14 - New York, NY
Dec 3 - San Diego, CA
Dec 9 - Toronto, ON

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
Nov 13 - Los Angeles, CA
Nov 18 - San Francisco, CA

Lightroom 5 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Nov 15 - Sacramento, CA
Dec 6 - Seattle, WA
Dec 13 - Jacksonville, FL

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Dec 11 - Calgary, AB

Don't forget, if you register for a seminar at least 14 days in advance, you can save $10 by using the code KTL10 at the checkout. And leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

The Grid – Lighting Critiques with Joe McNally
If you missed yesterday’s episode of The Grid, it’s one that you’re going to want to watch! Special guest Joe McNally joined Scott for a show focused solely on critiquing photographers’ lighting. Hearing Joe’s insight from his 30+ years of experience was incredibly eye-opening and thought provoking. The episode will be up at sometime today, as well as on the Kelby YouTube channel.

Last Week’s Winners 1-Month Subscriptions
– Mark Soderlund
– Peter Nord

Kelby Training Live Ticket
– smilingmike

LensProToGo $150 Gift Card
– Lisa Crane

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

(picture of the Dancing House in Prague, Czech Republic.  Can see more info & vote at 500px)


Hey Guys, RC here- wanted to thank Scott for letting me randomly come in and just share with you a couple of things that i’ve been up to, as well as some resources that I think you guys would really dig – in the event that you’ve missed them.

The Exclusive Look at the Profoto B1 500 AirTTL

I’ve been out traveling a bit more than normal (the shot above was something that I took while in Germany and the Czech Republic testing out the 41Megapixel Nokia phone), but that didnt stop me from making it out to the Photo Plus conference in New York.  While there I was approached by the folks at Profoto and given an exclusive access to do a “First Look” video at their new battery powered light.  I was grateful for the opportunity, and wanted to get as much information as I could into a bonus Photography Tips and Tricks episode.  If you’re not familiar with my weekly podcast on this, make sure you click on this link to check it out.

Exposing HDR : Zombie Attack!


I love being able to find new and interesting ways to teach something.  To that, I had been cooking up an idea for going through HDR in an urbex fashion, yet add another dimension to it.  With the Halloween season, I figured it be a good idea to take this concept and add a splash of zombies to the mix, making “Exposing HDR”.  It seems like people are really digging it – and Im thankful to all of you who have checked it out already.  If you havent – make sure you go and see it here 


Just Plain Love: A Bresson Documentary

A couple of weeks ago, I did an episode of  The Grid with Pete Collins and Brad Moore talking about the importance of having a visual library of photography from which to build on your own work.  In there, I had mentioned a free documentary that was on youtube from Henri Cartier Bresson called “Just Plain Love”.  I thought this was a great shot in the inspirational arm for this morning and thought i’d reshare that.


I Got Gregory Heislers New Book and Love It!

While I was out at Photo Plus, I was able to take in a lecture and a live shoot with someone that I have on my top 3 list of inspirations for me – Gregory Heisler.  Gregory is widely considered to be the master at the art of the Portrait – and he is one person that never disappoints in a talk.  He has a new book out (thats been killing it, btw), and in NY his book release party was actually thrown by Mayor Bloomberg!  I was fortunate enough to be in a spot where he was selling his book and got a signed copy of it – something I am personally very proud of.  Just great stories and information on what it takes to really get down to the essence of making a portrait of someone, with some amazing photography in it (my fav shot right now has to be his OJ Simpson shot… wont spoil it).  To check out the book, click on this link


Hopefully this has brought a little something for everyone, and giving you a quick taste of the things i’ve been up to.  Again.. thanks for the opportunity.  If you’d like to keep up with my antics, i’d suggest following me at or at

Photo by Jana Mobley

Very honored to be able to have this platform today. Great thanks to Scott and Brad for giving me the opportunity.

It was about 6 years ago that one of my good friend's dad loaned me his Nikon 35mm film camera. I had decided that I was going to major in Studio Art at The University of Alabama. One of the required classes for that specific major was a black and white darkroom photography. I can remember like it was yesterday; learning to expose film properly, develop it with chemicals, and then print in the darkroom. This had not been my original plan. Not at all.

When I was 15 my step father gave me a video camera for Christmas. That camera really changed the way I saw things. I was always making videos of friends and family. It might have been that I was trying to recreate a scene in a movie or I was just filming my friends doing highschool type of stuff. Nonetheless, I really became attached to the motion camera. Because of my interest in motion and cameras I started watching as many movies as I could and studying the camera moves, the composition, the blocking, the lighting, colors, etc. At a friend's recommendation, I watched the film, "American Beauty" directed by Sam Mendes and DP'd by Conrad Hall.

That movie had one of the greatest impacts on me as far as drama and lighting go. It really opened me up to what the possibilities of filmmaking could really be. From that point on, I decided that I wanted to be a feature film cinematographer. So I of course started to apply to all the great schools of cinematography. I was pretty naive at the time. I was an 18 year old kid from Alabama who barely passed high school. Who was I kidding thinking that I was going to get into USC. But I gave it a shot anyway.

Well, a few months later I opened the mail and to my disappointment I could not get into any of the schools that I thought would be the best for my "career."

So I ended up going to the school in my hometown’s backyard, The University of Alabama. Unfortunately, there was no cinematography or film program being offered at the time at UofA. That's where we come back to my story about borrowing the 35mm Nikon. Because I could not study cinematography, I decided the next best thing would be photography. So once again I gave it a shot.

I soon fell in love with photography so much that I decided I should make it my career path. One of my teachers shared with me a book by photographer, Richard Avedon, called In the American West. It was a book of portraits that Avedon took over a period of several years every summer out west. He traveled with his assistants by car through the west and photographed complete strangers that piqued his interest. After seeing Avedon's book it really changed everything for me as far as photography goes.

His portraits had this drama, authenticity, and power to them that really tugged at my heart. They moved me in a way that nothing else did at the time. That's when I realized how powerful a single photograph could be.  Before that I had no objective with my camera. I was a young 20 year old kid shooting everything from flowers, to buildings, to railroad tracks. I was just a guy with a camera that did not have a voice or vision. But after seeing Avedon's book I became literally obsessed with portraiture.

At this point I had no idea how to exactly make a career out of photography, but it didn't bother me.  All I wanted to do was photograph the people that I would encounter. I started driving hours outside of my hometown to rural southern towns. I would walk up to complete strangers and ask to take their portrait. At first it was scary asking someone you didn’t know if you could make their portrait. Most people did not understand, but usually always said yes. I ended up shooting lots of people and making a true foundation for my portfolio. I was never being paid to create any of this work. I really had a true sense of commitment and passion to be constantly making portraits.

After a few years, I started to think about how I was going to turn this into a career. I started showing the work that I had created to magazines and advertising agencies around Alabama. I did a lot of studying and reading on the internet about what kind of people actually hire photographers. Before I knew it, people started hiring me for jobs. It was nothing too glamorous, but I was having the time of my life actually getting paid every once in a while to take pictures of people. It was almost like I was so naive at the beginning of my career, not knowing exactly what to do and showing work after I had only been shooting for a couple of years that it worked in my favor.

Fast forward 4 years later, and a lot has happened. I got married, tooks lots of pictures, showed lots of pictures, hustled all over the south trying to meet people, got an agent, hustled more, took more pictures, got a few breaks in Alabama shooting some big ad campaigns, left it all and moved to New York, started over again, hustled even more, took even more more pictures, and now I've been living in New York for two and a half years still shooting.

Through all these years I've learned a few things that I thought I would share today that have helped me in the photography industry.Hopefully not to disappoint, but there are no lighting tips involved, nothing about lenses and cameras, or the latest gear.

1.) Persistence/Hustle
This is probably one of my greatest strengths. It has helped me build the career that I've had so far and has led to a lot of amazing opportunities. Without persistence I don't think I would be a photographer right now. When it comes to getting hired in photography a lot of this business is about relationships + talent. You have to have talent, but you also have to be good at getting to know the right people. I've always been very persistent in going after new clients. I have lists pinned to my wall near my computer that have my "dream" clients listed. I'm always looking at that list reminding myself of who to stay in touch with and who to be showing new work to. There are some people on that list that have never responded to one of my efforts, but I don't stop trying. However, it is important to find a personal balance of being persistent without being too pushy or annoying. I've made a lot of work that was never seen or never appreciated, but I've continued to constantly produce new work and refine my skills.

2.) Focus/Vision
Knowing what I want to make photographs of is really important to me. I've always felt an attraction to making pictures of people. That's what I've focused on ever since I fell in love with portraiture. I really try to hone my craft by always making portraits and pushing myself technically and creatively. There are sometimes where I feel that I get into a rut from a creative standpoint. I sometimes go into my default way of photographing, which basically means that I resort to what feels comfortable. That can be a trap. It's always good to get out of your comfort zone and try something new – usually that's when your best work is created. I decided a couple of years ago that I wanted to be known for something in photography. In a sense, I wanted to become a master at something. I'm not implying that I'm in any way shape or form a "true master" at photography, I just simply strive to be one. My focus is making portraits and always trying to improve the way I work. I would much rather be great at one thing in photography, than be mediocre at a few.

3.) Show your work
Life's too short to not give a go at something you love. Once photography became my passion, I have never stopped trying to make it my sole career. I would go to meet potential clients while I was still in college. I hardly knew anything about photography, but I knew that I wanted to make a living from it because of how much I loved it. Most people I hear from are always waiting to show their work when they think it's perfect. That was not the case for me. I started early – I got out there and showed it to anyone that would give me the time – I still do. Anytime I'm traveling on assignment, I might stay in a city for another day or so and make meetings with agencies and magazines. Once I had built a successful career in Alabama, I left it all to start all over in New York. I knew what kind of photography I wanted to do and I knew that I needed to be in a place like New York to make it happen. From the moment I moved to the city I hit the subways and went all over the city lugging my portfolio. I still make an effort every few months to make more rounds of meetings. The point is that you can't wait, you just have to get out there and show your work.

These three points have really been a foundation for the success of my career thus far. Without them I really don't think I would be anywhere. As you know, there is obviously more to my work than these three principles. I think to be successful in the photography industry you have to find a way to stand out. Which is much easier said than done. I still don't feel like I'm there yet, but I'm really enjoying the process of finding that path. Hope you enjoyed the post and maybe you can take something away from it.

You can see more of Miller’s work at, and follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Audi R8 Detail Shoot with some interesting new lights
When I found out one of my friend’s had a brand new red Audi R8, I was begging them to let me shoot it, and this week I got about an hour to shoot some detail shots (here’s a few above), and the car was, just insane! I’m hoping to get another chance soon to shoot the full car in an airplane hanger, so I’m pretty psyched. But for this shoot I tried out some groundbreaking new lights, and I don’t want to spill the beans because I did a behind-the-scenes video (hopefully I can share it here next week), but they were pretty darn slick, and I can’t wait to share it with you as soon as the video is ready.

Location shoot for Empower Boxing
Yesterday I snuck out of the office with Brad to do a quick portrait with James, the owner of the literally just-opened Empower Boxing gym in Tampa, Florida. Very cool guy and a very cool set-up, with heavy bags hanging…well…everywhere. Some behind-the-scenes shots coming next week as well.

Wednesday’s Episode of “The Grid”
If you missed this week’s “Scott Responds to the Creative Cloud Feedback” episode of “The Grid,” the rebroadcast is above. The first half of the show is about Adobe’s subscription-only announcement, and the 2nd half is about an idea I had for Adobe for photographers, and it got lots of love from the community. If you’re going to comment here, make sure you watch the Grid first, before you comment, ’cause if I can tell you didn’t watch it, I’m pulling it. Just so ya know.

That’s it for now. Hope you all have a great Friday, and a kick-butt weekend.



P.S. I’m in Seattle with my new tour on May 23rd, and then LA on the 24th. Hope you can join me

Photoshop World
There are less than two weeks left to take advantage of the Early Bird pricing for Photoshop World Orlando! Register before March 15 to save $100 and join the greatest Photoshop and photography instructors in the world.

Once you’re registered, make sure you book your room at the Rosen Centre Hotel so you can stay where the instructors stay! Rooms at the most conveniently located hotel (just across the street from the convention center) are limited, and once they’re gone, they’re gone.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a full conference pass!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Matt KloskowskiRC Concepcion, or Ben Willmore? Check out these seminar tours!

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Mar 15 - Tampa, FL
Mar 25 - Houston, TX

Photographic Artistry with Adobe Photoshop with Ben Willmore
Mar 19 - New York, NY
Mar 20 - Washington, DC

Lightroom 4 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Mar 22 - Phoenix, AZ

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Growing Your Business with Scott Kelby
Ever wondered how Scott Kelby started Kelby Media Group then grew it into what it is today? Check out his latest class, Growing Your Business, on to get his advice on partnering with the right people, taking risks, using social media for promotion, and more!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Southwestern Photojournalism Conference with Dave Black
This weekend, Dave Black will be presenting at the Southwestern Photojournalism Conference in Fort Worth! This conference holds a special place in my (Brad’s) heart because it’s the first place I ever met Dave and Joe McNally. Past presenters have also included Scott Kelby, Jeremy Cowart, Bill Fortney, and myself.

If you’re in the area (or up for a flight or drive), sign up to come hang with Dave and some other great photographers like Eugene Richards who are presenting. I’ll be there as well, so come join us!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of one of Dave Black’s classes.

FREE Photoshop Elements 11 Book for Digital Photographers
Our friends over at the Photoshop Elements Techniques Newsletter (PET), have a great special right now. Subscribe for the PET newsletter and member website, and you’ll get Scott and Matt’s Photoshop Elements 11 Book for Digital Photographers free. It almost makes your membership absolutely free, but it’s only for a limited time so head on over to

Kelby Training Live Seminar
– Alex Alegre

That’s it for today. Enjoy the last day of February!