Tuesday
Jul
2014
15

If you heard from me…that was me.

by Scott Kelby  |  86 Comments

Above: That’s me. Not the print. That’s me holding the print. You know what I mean. 

So many times I get Facebook or Twitter or G+ comments, even emails, that start off by saying, “To the person who comments for Scott” or “To whomever answers Scott’s emails” or “To the intern that responds to comments on Scott’s blog” and stuff along those lines, so I thought I’d do a quick Q&A to let you know when it’s me and when it’s not me. Here goes:

Q. If I post a comment on your Facebook page, and I see a response from you, who is it that is actually writing that response?
A. Me.  

Q. So who answers for you on Twitter and Google+, then?
A. Ummmm… that’s Me.  

Q. What about here on the blog?
A. Me. Still, me.   

Q. Is it ever anyone else?
A. Nope. If you heard from me…that was me. 

Q. So Brad doesn’t answer as you? Not ever?
A. Never. If Brad answers anybody, he says “Hey, it’s Brad here…”

Q. How do you have the time to answer all these people directly?
A. I try and answer as many people back as I can, and some days that means I get to answer 40 or 50 people, and some days that means just two or three, and sometimes none at all (it really depends on my schedule at home and at the office, and if I’m traveling or out of the country). It also depends what they’re asking. If it’s something I can answer quickly, I try and answer, but if it’s something drawn out that takes more time I often run out of time. In fact, I seem to run out of time a lot. Lol!

Q. Do you respond to private messages on Facebook or G+ or DM’s on Twitter?
A. Honestly, I rarely check those, if ever. I’m trying to check the Facebook ones more now, but maybe just once at week at best.

Q. How come?
A. It’s because if I added those other three contact points to my daily inbox of literally sometimes over 200 emails, I would never get any work done; I wouldn’t be able to write books; or see my kids, see my wife, occasionally visit the restroom, sleep, drive, play guitar, ya know — stuff like that. I try to answer as many emails as possible, but I generally don’t even get through a day’s worth. My inbox is pretty scary looking. 

Q. So what’s the best way to get ahold of you? 
A. Hit me up on Twitter. I check it several times a day, but again — I’m not checking DMs — just public Tweets where you’re calling me out in the Tweet. I can’t answer them all, but I get to quite a few each day. Sometimes I get behind and catch up a day or two later.  

Q. Do you have a public email address?
A. I do, but those emails go first to my assistant Lynn.  A number of those she answers back directly, BUT NOT AS ME! She answers back as Scott’s assistant Lynn (so you know it’s coming from her). A lot of times people are asking for something that Lynn can send them or help them with, or get them to the right place or what have you and she does an awesome job of all that routing. Every day Lynn also forwards me emails she thinks I would want to see so I can answer those folks back directly, and I answer those daily (well, at least within a day or two). By the way, if you’re lonely and feel like talking to Lynn first, my public email is skelby@photoshopuser.com

Q. Can I call you?
A. Sure. My office number is 813-433-5000

Q. Will I get through?
A. I doubt it. I mean, someone will answer the phone, but then eventually you’ll wind up with Lynn and she’ll tell you I’m “unavailable” which is true since I’m not there. Well, at least not now anyway, but just so ya know — it’s easier squeezing toothpaste back into the tube than it is to get past Lynn. She’s like that USA Goalie Tim Howard, but with phone calls. By the way, she never falls for that, “I’m an old high school friend of Scott’s” trick. I had no friends in high school. Just my typewriter, and a stick and a ball of yarn.Well, those and Ken Toney. 

Q. Do you actually read all your comments on social media and here on the blog?
A. I read every single one. 

Q. But I sent you an email and I never heard back?
A. That’s because as much as I’d like to, I can’t answer every email I receive, even if you have a legit question or idea or concern or just want to chat about something happening in the industry (I get quite a lot of those and again, depending on my schedule, I answer as many as I can, which isn’t as many as I get). Also, shorter emails are MUCH more likely to get read. If you start your email with, “I started photography at the age of nine…” there’s a good change I won’t make it into your teens.

Q. So who writes all your blog posts?
A. I write the blog on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays. On Wednesday, it’s “Guest Blog Wednesday” and I turn over the blog to someone else in our industry, and I’m so thankful to Vincent Versace for coming up with the idea, because over the years some amazing posts from some incredible people have blossomed there thanks to his idea (which is why each year Vinnie returns with a Guest Blog post of his on the anniversary of “Guest Blog Wednesday”). On Thursday it’s “Free Stuff Thursday and Brad writes that post totally himself, and he finds something to give away every Thursday as well. On Thursdays we feature any workshops or projects our friends or doing, or anything we have coming up that’s fun or interesting here at K1. I’m very grateful to Brad for shepherding Wednesdays and blogging for me on Free Stuff Thursdays. He works really hard on both and he rocks it like a boss! 

Q. OK, so you answer your social media sites and you write your blog three days-a-week, but can you please tell me who writes your books? 
A. Ugh! I’ve heard this one for years (even from other authors in our industry). but I write all my own books. Always have. My Publishers and Editors all know it, but I know nobody believes it. My wife surely knows it. It used to make me mad, but now I’m pretty much at peace with it, but if you see my name on the cover, I wrote ALL of it. Even the captions, even the forwards, all the intros — even though it kind of drives my in-house editor’s a bit nuts, because I know they’d like to help out but I’m just kind of anal about that stuff, so I feel like I have to do it myself. It’s probably some character flaw or something, and my life would sure be a lot easier if I used a ghost writer or an intern or just paid somebody to write my stuff, and while my life would be easier, I wouldn’t be happier. I joke around a lot, and I have a quirky often sophomoric sense of humor, but I take the education part of my writing, and my life, very seriously.

Now, if you see TWO names on the book title, that means I have a co-author and we split the book in half (for example, he did 5 chapters — I did the other five) with the exception of my Elements Book which I co-author with Matt Kloskowski, where Matt now does the Lion’s share of the book (and he kicks butt at it). 

Q. Do you ever delete people’s comments on FB, G+ or here on the blog?
A. Rarely, but if  someone is mean to me, calls me names,  or if they’re mean to someone else commenting, I do sometimes delete a comment. How often? Maybe one every six weeks. I let a LOT of stuff slide, but if someone crosses the line I have no problem with hitting the delete button. I wound up deleting two or three in a day once, but that was just a crazy day. Also, if you say really naughty words, that’ll get that button hit as well. Luckily, most folks here on the blog, or who follow me on social are pretty cool, so thankfully I don’t have to do it very often. Hey, I just realized — it’s been over two months now. Somebody’s probably due. LOL!!

Q. What topics bring out comments that might get deleted?
A. If I mention I’m buying a new iPhone — that’s #1. Now, understand, I’m not telling other folks to buy one — if I just merely mention “Hey, Apple announced a new iPhone — can’t wait to get it” you can almost count the seconds until someone gets deleted. It’s a lock. Look for that post around September, then step back a few feet so you’re not caught in the blast zone. It gets really personal, really fast. I wake up with my finger on the Delete and Block commenter button. 

Q. Are you, in fact, Ken Toney?
A. It’s possible.

Q. Really?
A. Anything’s possible.

Q. Come on?
A. OK, Ken Toney and I are actually separate people living in separate States (for legal reasons), but I love the guy like a brother. 

Q. Have you ever had to delete one of his comments?
A. Oh, all the time. He has a mouth like a sailor — his comments read like the transcript of an Andrew Dice Clay stand-up routine. 

Q. Really?
A. Anything’s possible. ;-)

Well, that’s it in a nutshell (this is me, in a nutshell). [did anybody get that reference?]. Anyway, I hope that clears the air a bit, so you know once and for all; if you hear from me…it’s me. :)

Have a fantastic Tuesday everybody. This has been an automated message. ;-)

Best,

-Scott #214a

Monday
Jul
2014
14

Protecting Your Photographic Memories. You Need to See This.

by Scott Kelby  |  16 Comments

Last week I heard about this Tedx talk given by photographer Kevin Gilbert on the importance of protecting your photographic memories (I don’t want share too much more than that, because I really want you to hear it from him).

His talk, titled “The Lost Generation,” is around 16-minutes long but it flies by because of the wonderful images, the funny and often touching stories, and his engaging, fun presentation style.

I promise you, this it will be worth your while. Not only will it make you think, it will probably put some great things in motion for you, and it’s sure to start your Monday with a smile.

Here’s wishing you all a fantastic Monday (if, ya know, there is such a thing. It’s kind of like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster).

Best,

-Scott

 

Friday
Jul
2014
11

Adobe Quietly Allays a Big Creative Cloud Concern in Lightroom 5.5

by Scott Kelby  |  15 Comments

In the most recent update to Creative Cloud users, Adobe did something I just did not see coming, and it’s designed to allay the concerns of some Lightroom Creative Cloud subscribers (or potential subscribers). Watch the video above first (it’s really short) which explains what they did, then I did a short Q&A below, which will only make sense after you watch the video:

Q. Does this affect me if I bought Lightroom outright, rather than subscribed?
A. Nope. Not at all. This only affects folks who are using Lightroom through a Creative Cloud subscription (either the full subscription or the Photographers Bundle).

Q. So, if the scenario plays out like you said in the video, can I still import photos into Lightroom?
A. Yup. You can import and export (so, if you’re working with Raw files, you can still export out JPEGs or Tiffs. you can even print your images!). 

Q. Why do you think they disabled the Map module?
A. That one had me stumped at first, but my guess is — they would owe royalties to Google for part of the Map integration and if they’re not collecting subscriptions they probably don’t want to pay royalties. I haven’t confirmed that with Adobe, but that’s my guess.

Q. Do you think they’ll do something similar for Photoshop CC?
A. If you had asked me Monday, I would have said no. Today, I’m thinking they might do something similar. Makes sense to me, but again — that’s just my guess (have not asked Adobe if this is in their plans).

Q. Does this mean that every time that I’ve opened either LR or Photoshop 2014 that its checking with Adobe to see if I’m paid up? (This question from Dave Cooley over on my Facebook page).
A. No. It checks just once a month.

Q. Hey Scott, I just bought your Photoshop for Lightroom users book! It’s great thank you! (that’s another comment from my Facebook page, this time from Monika Rohfeld).
A. Monika, that’s not a question, but I’m going to let that slide because any comment that refers to my “Photoshop Book for Lightroom Users” should be highlighted here as an example of “the perfect Facebook comment,” so thank you Monika. My Publisher thanks you. My children’s college fund thanks you. I thank you. 

Q. If I already have Lightroom, can I still subscribe and get PS also? And if I cancel, the only gone for me would be PS? (another from my Facebook page. this one from Kellie Durbin Carey).
A. OK, that’s a toughie. You can subscribe to just Photoshop, but I believe it’s actually more expensive (like double) the cost of the Photographer’s Bundle of Lightroom & Photoshop and Lightroom Mobile for $9.99 a month, so here’s what I’d do: Go with the Bundle deal for $9.99, but keep using your current Lightroom for now (don’t update it to the Creative Cloud version of 5.5). That way, if you cancel, you’ll still have a fully functioning Lightroom. However, when Lightroom 6 comes out (whenever that is), then you’ll pay the full upgrade price. 

Q. Can you still write xmp data to file? Then you can use Bridge/ACR with settings that were applied in Lightroom? (Facebook comment from Susan Koppel)
A. I haven’t tested it myself yet, but you can still write XMP files (that’s a Library module function) so theoretically you could do just what you’re saying. Again, haven’t tested it, but it makes sense. Good thinking by the way, Susan.

Q. This has nothing to do with Lightroom, but I heard Joe McNally’s new online class came out yesterday. Is it as good as everybody says?
A. It’s better. This is a comment on Joe’s class I saw on Google+ from Martin Gleixner “Hands down – the best class ever I’ve seen on #kelbyone. Joe is unbelievable. Thank you so much for this great evening with Joe McNally.” Saw this one on Twitter from @irishmikenyc: “Wow! Thank you so much scott & joe, this kind of info is just as or more valuable than settings n’ gear.” This one from Facebook from Jill Martin, “I didn’t want to have my hopes up when you talked about it on the grid a week ago, but no worries, it was everything you claimed it would be. Very good class. The entire year’s subscription would have been worth it just for this one class.” Yes, it’s that good. Here’s the link: http://kel.by/TV6fFV

Q. You are so incredibly lucky that someone asked that question about Joe’s class, right?
A. Ummmmmm, yeah. That was lucky, right? (cough, cough). 

Q. Hey, wait a minute…you didn’t ask that last one yourself did you?
A. Would I do something like that? (don’t answer that — you’re already out of questions). 

Q. So does the LR news also mean any PSD files aren’t orphaned & can be seen/exported via LR if you loose PS w/o a subscription? (On my Twitter page from Steve Brazill – @razz2)
A. Yes, but your PDS files weren’t orphaned even before this news because you can open PSDs and view and print them in a dozen different programs. LR does like you resave as a JPEG, but there are probably others that do, too. 

Q. I’ll stay with my non subscription version on my Mac. (David Hays from my Facebook page).
A. Thanks for letting me know. That’s really helpful?

Q. Adobe listened when a lot of us were bellyaching when CC was released. Kudos to them.  Great company! (from Kevin Graham over on my Google+ page).
A. Not a question Kevin, but I’m still running it here because I’m happy to see someone acknowledging that Adobe made a big positive step by doing this. This is a good thing — it adds a safety net for subscribers — many of whom I felt had a valid concern and I’m glad Adobe addressed it the way they did. A little amazed, but glad. Still surprised they left the Web, Slideshow and Print modules intact. 

OK, that’s the big news from yesterday — (well, that and Joe’s class which I think was pretty big news). Hope you all have a fantastic weekend, and we’ll see you back here on Monday. :)

Thursday
Jul
2014
10

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  15 Comments

The Art of Digital Photography: The Inspirational Series with Greg Heisler
Join Mia McCormick and Gregory Heisler as they sit down to discuss Greg’s award-winning career as a portraitist. Greg is known the world over for his evocative portraits of some of the most well known leaders in government, business, the arts, and more. Spend an hour hearing inspiring stories of how Greg got started in photography, and some of the many lessons he has learned along the way. From the importance of having a unique vision that transcends technique to the willingness to take chances when everything is on the line, Greg and Mia discuss key moments in Greg’s experience as a portrait photographer that will surely give you a new appreciation for his thoughtful approach to his work.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

Creating Websites with Lightroom and the SmugMug Plug-In
SmugMug is known as one of the industry’s best looking and easiest ways to show off, sell, and print your photos online. In this class, Matt Kloskowski walks you through setting up and using the SmugMug Lightroom plug-in to get your galleries online.

Leave a comment for your chance to watch this class for free!

KelbyOne Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, or Corey Barker? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Aug 26 – St. Louis, MO
Aug 28 – Kansas City, MO

One Flash, Two Flash with Joe McNally
July 24 – Milwaukee, WI
July 28 – Boston, MA

Photoshop Down & Dirty Master FX with Corey Barker
Aug 1 – Miami, FL
Aug 13 – Austin, TX

You can check out the full schedule for seminars through August, and we’ll be updating it with more dates soon! Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Lost Photos from Macphun
Ever wanted to find photos that you know are buried deep in your email but have no idea where to find them?

Lost Photos is a handy Mac app that securely scans your email account for every photo you’ve ever sent or received and then displays them for you in a convenient browser.  All photos are downloaded to your computer, making it ultra-fast to view them, archive them to permanent storage, edit them and even share them again.

Install Lost Photos for FREE to access the first 100 photos from your email account(s), then upgrade for a couple of bucks to get an unlimited number of photos.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free canvas print of one of your photos that Lost Photos uncovers for you!

Last Week’s Winners
KelbyOne Class Rental
- Thor Doc

KelbyOne Live Ticket
- Jose G

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

Wednesday
Jul
2014
09

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Brad Moore!

by Brad Moore  |  28 Comments

I recently had the opportunity to cover a sold out arena show for the band Third Day, who gave me full access to do pretty much anything I wanted. Today I want to share some of those shots with you, as well as my experience covering the show. I also recently shot some band portraits for another artist that I’ll share after the concert stuff.

As soon as I got the phone call asking if I was available to come to Atlanta and cover the Third Day show, and being told I would have full access, I knew I wanted to set up a remote camera on stage to capture the view of the band performing with the sold-out audience as well. I set it up during the band’s sound check (as you can see in the test shot above) using two Manfrotto Magic arms (one to hold the camera and another attached to the rail and arm holding the camera for added security/support).

The camera itself is a Canon 5D Mark III with a 8-15mm fisheye lens at 15mm, and I put the biggest memory card I had in it to make sure I didn’t run out of card space during the show as I wouldn’t have access to it to swap out cards. Since this was my first time setting up a remote camera on stage, I just took a guess at the settings and hoped it would work. I went with Spot Metering, Auto ISO with 1/250 as the minimum shutter and 12,800 as the max ISO, and f/5.6 just to be safe on depth of field.

To trigger the camera, there’s a PocketWizard Plus III in the hot shoe and connected to the remote port with the appropriate cable, and I had another PocketWizard Plus III in my front shirt pocket that I used to trigger it during the show. I could have put the PocketWizard I had on me on one of the cameras I was carrying if I wanted the on-stage camera to shoot at the same time I was shooting, but I opted not to.

This allowed me to capture some key moments during the show from a unique perspective, as well as show the size of the crowd. These guys aren’t doing too badly for a band that’s both been around for over 20 years, and it’s still four of the founding members!

It’s always a privilege to shoot soundcheck, so here are a couple of my favorites from that:

The band invited some friends to join them for the show, including one of my other favorite bands, Needtobreathe, who were also in town for their own shows at The Tabernacle that weekend and stopped by for a couple of songs:

And here are a few more of my favorites from the evening:

And at the end of the show, I went on stage to get a shot of them facing me with the crowd behind them:

It’s a cool experience being able to shoot for a band that you grew up listening to and can now call friends, so I’m hoping to have the privilege of shooting for these guys more in the future!

Speaking of friends in a band, my buds in Preson Phillips recently released a new album and needed some shots to help promote it. They wanted a close up, kinda harsh and gritty look, so here’s what I wound up doing for them:


Preson Phillips (aka Tommy), singer, acoustic guitar


Nate Murray, bass


Mickey Holm, drums


Tim McTague, one of a few dudes who play rotate on electric guitar

I mainly used all constant lights for these shots; two Westcott TD6s with strip banks on either side and a fluorescent ring light (mainly for the catchlight in the eyes). The background light was an Elinchrom BRX 500 with a reflector aimed at the white wall behind them:

So there you have it, a look into a couple of my recent shoots. Hopefully some of this was helpful and will inspire some creativity in you as well. If you have any questions, leave a comment and I’ll do my best to respond as soon as I can!

You can see more of Brad’s work at BMOOREVISUALS.com, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram.

Tuesday
Jul
2014
08

100 Ways Lightroom Kicks The Bridge (and Camera Raw’s) A$$!

by Scott Kelby  |  17 Comments

A few years ago, Matt and I started a project to answer a question we’ve been asked again and again: “I already have the Bridge & Camera Raw — why should I switch to Lightroom? ” or “I thought Lightroom was just the same as the Bridge and Camera Raw.” Uggh! It kind of like saying “I already have a kit lens — why would I want anything else?” 

It’s particularly frustrating because Lightroom has so many advantages over the Bridge & Camera Raw — it’s a whole different world, but Matt and I know there’s just no way to explain that in just a few words, and that’s why way back in Lightroom 3, we created this side-by-side comparison called “100 Ways Lightroom Kicks The Bridge (and Camera Raw’s) A$$!” where we created 100 short, straight-to-the-point videos (30 to 60-seconds each) that make it all crystal clear.

That way, people could go directly to the topics that interested them most (since I doubt anyone would watch all 100, or would be willing to sit through 100 when they only needed a few to change their mind). NOTE: There is a little forward button at the top right corner of each video, which you can click to take you to the next video, in case you want to watch all 100.

Here’s the link.

Why Now?
Because it came up once again on last week’s episode of “The Grid” (the same old questions and misconceptions) and with Adobe’s Creative Cloud Photographer’s Bundle now a permanent part of Adobe’s product line (You get Photoshop CC, Lightroom 5 and Lightroom Mobile for $9.99 a month), I thought it was time to revisit that list, even though Lightroom has added tons of new features since we created that original site (at the very least, watch the short intro that Matt and I put together to get you started).

By the way, you can download a free 30-day fully-working trial version of Lightroom 5 from Adobe, and give it a whirl yourself (download link for Mac & Windows) — you’ll super-dig it ( I cannot tell you how many emails we’ve gotten from people around the world who have thanked us for turning them on to Lightroom over the years). Hope you find it helpful.

Have a great Tuesday everybody! :)

Best,

-Scott

Page 17 of 488« First...10...1516171819...304050...Last »
Advertisement