Hi Gang, and happy Friday: Tomorrow (July 4th) is a big holiday for us here in the US â” it's Independence Day â” a day where all Americans celebrate their independence from Glyn Dewis and Dave Clayton (shown pictured with me above. They both serve as Beefeaters in service to Her Majesty The Queen as Yeomen Warders of Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress the Tower of London, and Members of the Sovereign’s Body Guard of the Yeoman Guard Extraordinary, but they are shown here in the regular street clothes, but you know and I know, those clothes are anything but regular).

If you're thinking of shooting some fireworks shots tonight, I wrote an article for ColaCola's Journey website where I take you through the recipe for how to make Awesome Fireworks photos (It's a step-by-step article â” follow the recipe and ya can't miss). Here's the link.

I would add three things to that article for the more serious photography crowd here on my blog. They are:

>> Set your focus to infinity (This isn't critical but if your lens can do it, why not). The fireworks are so bright you can use just regular ol' auto focus for the most part, but if you have a lens that has a distance scale window on the top of your lens barrel; first turn off your auto focus (right on the lens â” switch it to off), then rotate the focus ring on your lens until you see the Infinity symbol [it looks like the number 8 lying on its side]. Again, you don't have to do this, but it might make things a bit easier.

>> Last year @SuzanMcEvoy (one of my followers over on my Twitter page) recommended also switching your White Balance to Tungsten and it works really well (Thanks Susan for the tip).

>> This one probably goes without saying, but you're on a tripod so use your lowest ISO setting for the cleanest shots.

Hope you all have a safe, happy 4th of July as we celebrate our nation's physical distance, in miles and magnitude, from Glyn and Dave which makes it truly a day worth celebrating. ;-)



Taming Natural Light with Erik Valind
Natural light is all around us, but it is up to the photographer to control it in order to make a beautiful portrait. Join Erik Valind as he shows you how to tame that natural light, from direct noontime sun to overcast and shadowless days, and capture killer portraits with little more than just your camera and a reflector. No speedlights or strobes are required for this class. Erik teaches you about the factors that you can control, and then walks you various techniques you can use through a series of real world demonstrations, each one building on the last, that will give you the skills to start seeing and using natural light in new ways. Click here to see the first lesson of this class for free!

Getting Started with Dreamweaver with Janine Warner
Take control of your website by learning Dreamweaver CC. Join Janine Warner, author of Dreamweaver for Dummies, as she teaches you the basic skills every Dreamweaver user needs to know to start building and managing a website. Whether you are completely new to Dreamweaver or just looking for a refresher, Janine will take you step-by-step through the process of setting up a simple website, creating new pages, adding and formatting text, inserting images, controlling the layout, and then linking it all together. By the end of the class you'll have the foundational skills you need to take you to the next level.  Click here to see the first lesson of this class for free!

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, or Ben Willmore live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they're coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
July 14 - London, UK
Sept 22 - Phoenix, AZ
Sept 28 - Austin, TX

The Moment It Clicks with Joe McNally
July 13 - Ottawa, ON
July 15 - Calgary, AB
July 17 - Toronto, ON
Aug 21 - Orlando, FL
Aug 24 - Miami, FL

Lightroom & Photoshop Creative Integration Tour with Ben Willmore
Aug 4 - Kansas City, MO
Aug 6 - St. Louis, MO
Aug 26 - Charlotte, NC

These are just some of the upcoming dates for these seminar tours. You can find the full calendar of events right here, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Deacon Blues

If that’s you, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

Enter my world cautiously, for all is not what it seems, and behind every image, there is always more than a single truth. We're living in a world consumed by fear of the truthâ”but is there really such a thing as "the truth" anymoreâ”especially in visual terms? It is fear of the unknown that causes people to judge and criticizeâ”fear of an illusion created by our own experiences and teachings. One individual's perspective may not be the same as another's, because we process and interpret visual stimuli in a variety of ways. Thus, what is reality, if not a collection of diverse perspectives?

Now that I've got the exposition out of the way, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Gisela Calitz, and I like to create worlds that viewers can explore, fantasy realms whereâ”even if just for a fraction of a single secondâ”everything is perfect. These ethereal worlds are my personal attempts at escapism, snippets and daydreams, where anything and everything is possible and dreams can become realities (even if just in print). Sometimes, I find there are surprising amounts of people who share my love for these ethereal fantasies, which is why I do what I do. So, I guess the logical question from here would be, what exactly do I do?

I'm a high fashion advertising and editorial retoucher. Generally, we make a lot less money than our everyday advertising counterparts, but I guess if I were in it for the money I would've been a doctor, or a lawyer. Case closed. I fell in love with the industry at an early stage in my life and have not looked back since. I thrive on working with people who are stimulated by fantasy and all things whimsical in nature, and I strive to highlight these elements in everything I do. Sometimes, I get lost in an ocean of colour and light; sometimes my work feels like a lucid dream, and I don't want to wake up.

Now, I've come to a point in my career where I've embraced the parallel between what I do to make a living and how I live life. Like life, the journey of an image through various editing suites (whichever they may be), involves a series of choices, each of which has its own set of consequences. And just like life, these choices need to be approached with a certain degree of forethought and caution. In the end, tools like Photoshop and Lightroom are just that: tools. But it's the human on the other end of these tools that is instrumental in the progression and, eventually, the execution of a quality image. I'm that human on the other side.

In Photoshop, as in life, there are a myriad of approaches at your disposal. There are technical retouchers and artistic retouchers, just like there are doctors and surgeons. Sure, they may use some of the same tools, but the end results are often vastly different. In my line of work, experimentation is crucial in discovering the ideal creative process. That's why I've spent a large deal of my life experimenting. I've chosen to do things my own way, opting for a totally unique routeâ”the road less travelled, so to speak. The results⦠well, I think they speak for themselves really.

It all began a few years ago when I was studying design and working as model. I approached a photographer I admired to do a design project on his work. No holding back. We began collaborating on more projects, and so my love for retouching blossomed. From there, it developed so rapidly it consumed me entirely.


Hi Gang: Once a month on “The Grid” RC and I do our “Blind Photo Critiques” episode where we ask our viewers to submit images for a live critique on the air. When the submitted images are portraits, we often see the same type of problems again and again, so I thought today I’d share a few hopefully helpful things to ask yourself about a portrait image to see if you’re on the right track â” kind of a checklist to mentally take your image through to see if it’s working.

This checklist is short and simple, and certainly not complete, but at least if you’ve asked yourself these things about it, you’ll be ahead of the game. Here we go:

(a) Does your subject look engaged, either with the camera or someone in the frame (or just off frame)?
Peter Hurley has a great staying for this, he says “Are they giving you anything?” This “engagement” from the subject is incredibly important, and without it, the rest of the stuff below, even if you have them all, probably won’t make it without this (unless “e” below works well enough).

(b) Is the light either really flattering or really appropriate to the subject?
That doesn’t necessarily mean soft â” it might mean hard light, depending on who your subject is, whether they’re male or female, and the mood you’re trying to create, but generally the flattering light part is pretty important.

(c) Is the background clean and simple?
If your background is simple for a straight up portrait, your chances for success go way up. This is bigger than it sounds. If the background is distracting, or has very bright areas that draw the viewers eye, your viewer won’t be looking where they’re supposed to be looking, and that’s not a good thing.

(d) Is the subject separated from the background?
In an outdoor portrait, creating some separation between your subject and the background usually helps put the focus on your subject. Try the lowest-numbered f/stop your lens will allow (f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6 â” the lower the number the better), and zoom in on your subject to help create that separation.

(e) Is the subject doing anything interesting?
They don’t always need to be engaged with you (at the camera) or someone in the scene if your subject is doing something interesting to the viewer. Seeing someone doing something interesting is justâ¦wellâ¦interesting!

Again, this isn’t the be-all, end-all list, but the next time you’re sitting in front of a portrait and you’re wondering if it “works,” run it through this checklist and see how it holds up (an ideal time to do this, is when you’re reviewing images during the shoot, while you can still do something about it â” if not, it’s still something to strive for on the next shoot).

Hope you find that helpful, and here’s wishing you an usually awesome, Tuesday! :)



P.S. If you live in the UK, I hope you’ll catch my monthly column in Digital Camera World magazine (link). I’ve been writing it now for about 7-months and having a lot of fun with it. 

Active Lifestyle Photography with Erik Valind
Get up and moving with Erik Valind in his latest class on active lifestyle photography! Lifestyle photography is all about capturing believable moments and showing that ideal reality in an image. When done right it should make you want to jump into the photograph and join the people in the picture. In this class Erik takes you through the basics of planning for your shoot, doing your research, and selecting your gear, and then moves through a variety of locations and activities to demonstrate how it works in the real world. Working with natural light, reflectors, studio strobes, and speedlights, you'll get a good handle on how to tailor your lighting to fit the mood of the scene, so you can capture those hero images showing the peak of action.

Click here to watch the first lesson of this class for free!

Adobe Encore: In Depth with Greg Mulvey
Greg Mulvey has been authoring DVDs since the late â˜90s, and in this course he will teach you how to use Adobe Encore to bring any project to life. Greg will go through the steps on how to create motion menus in after effects, pop up menus for blue ray, as well as publishing the full version of your project to the web.

KelbyOne Live
Want to learn from Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, or Ben Willmore live in person? Check out these seminar tour dates to see if they're coming to a city near you!

Shoot Like A Pro: Reloaded with Scott Kelby
July 14 - London, UK
Sept 22 - Phoenix, AZ
Sept 28 - Austin, TX

The Moment It Clicks with Joe McNally
July 13 - Ottawa, ON
July 15 - Calgary, AB
July 17 - Toronto, ON
Aug 21 – Orlando, FL
Aug 24 – Miami, FL

Lightroom & Photoshop Creative Integration Tour with Ben Willmore
Aug 4 - Kansas City, MO
Aug 6 - St. Louis, MO
Aug 26 – Charlotte, NC

These are just some of the upcoming dates for these seminar tours. You can find the full calendar of events right here, and leave a comment for your chance to win a free ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winner
KelbyOne Live Ticket
– Michael Scott

If this is you, we'll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

Hey, I’m Courtney and I’m a commercial beauty photographer located in Los Angeles. I was pretty excited when Brad asked me to do a guest blog, simply because I respect the Kelby Blog and its audience so much.

A bit about me: I’m originally from The Detroit Suburbs. I started my photo business in 2004, in Pontiac, Michigan. After about two years of fighting my way in a small competitive market, I set my eyes on a bigger prize. I had to move to a bigger market! NYC or LA? My sole determining factor of choosing LA, was its zillion sunny days and lack of snow. I know SO many of you feel me on this. Now I’ve been in LA for nearly 9 years and I’ve fine-tuned my studio down to one genre: I shoot beauty editorials, campaigns and e-comm for health and beauty companies. Basically, I get to work with gorgeous women all day and make money doing it. Not a bad gig at all!

Cosmopolitan Mexico

Allure Russia

Campaign image for a Fashionable health and beauty line

Back a few years ago, I had an opportunity to teach on the photography tradeshow and workshop speaking circuit. It was exciting and scary all at the same time. But, I had 10 years of professional work under my belt and many war stories. After years of fighting in the trenches with contracts, NDAs, and painful negotiations, I felt I was ready to guide others on how to close deals and how to not be taken advantage. That’s when I launched PhotoBeautyCoach.com, my coaching site. Over the last few years, I’ve seen a trend in the most common topic I deal with in Skype sessions, “Licensing Images for Commercial Use.”

With the rise of social media, and specifically Instagram, the business is changing rapidly. But I always advise photographers to stay true to their business, aka don’t be a sellout.

Let’s say you are a portrait photographer in Omaha, Nebraska and you are contacted by a large mall store chain. Their email fluffs your ego as they gush about an image on your website. They would absolutely love to “feature” you in their next catalog, campaign, mailing; pick your poison. For this use, they will offer you a gift card, exposure or maybe a t-shirt. I use this as an example, simply because I see and hear of this scenario weekly.

This is where it all begins, This is where you set yourself apart from the others. Time to negotiate.

Temptu Cosmetics

Personally, I would never move forward with a large company offering me payment in something so small, for so something so large. It’s insulting, and exposure equals nothing. A t-shirt costs them most likely $2. I have YET to see exposure work in the real world. And you’re worth more than $2.

Before you even consider to think about what the use means to you and your business a few questions MUST be asked.

I'll walk you through the process of getting the information you need to make it worth your time for someone else to benefit from your hard work. Because no one should profit from your work, unless you're profiting too!

Footnote: Im just barely touching upon this.  These are the questions I advise my clients to get answers to before I Skype with them. 

I CANNOT stress this more. Do not negotiate until the Copyright Office have been paid $35 and it’s processing your claim. It takes 10-15 minutes and will save you a huge nightmare later! Also, if there are clients in this photo in question, look for your release STAT.

Second: Now what to ask the buyer?
You need to rank the client in order to set your fee - Are they are an ad agency, editorial, direct client, mom and pop shop, individual, etc.? I’m much more flexible for an upstart or mom and pop shop than I am for a large company. If they have a giant budget, they should have a proper budget to pay for use. I was recently contacted by a well known dentist in Detroit to do work for his billboards. Five billboards along the side of every major freeway in the area. $150 budget. Thanks, but no thanks. The way I see it is, if someone is going to market and make money off my images, I should be compensated fairly. I took the time to explain my estimate and why I charge what I do. (Every opportunity I see to educate a client, I do!)

Third: Licensing
Ask how exactly will the image(s) be used. Here are factors to consider when estimating:

  • What is the use?  Print Ad, trade ad, packaging, direct mail, billboards, Brochures – single use or multiple use?
  • What is the circulation? Local, state, regional, national, international?
  • What is the frequency?
  • What is length of the desired license? 1-2 years max Is advisable
  • Would they like the image to be used exclusively by their company (i.e. can you sell it to others or do they want to be the only entity using it?)

Now, take the time to consider all information given, and to think about where you’d be comfortable. Knowing what you know now for use, that sweet t-shirt that was offered might seem really uncool. So many companies are not very transparent when it comes to facts. They are hoping their charm will woo you. Look away from the shiny red t-shirt, and focus your attention on your worth.

Draw up a proper estimate. I use BlinkBid for my bids and invoicing. You can also use Quickbooks or other invoicing programs. What makes BlinkBid my personal choice is it has a built-in Bid Consultant that gives a range for pricing based on many of the questions asked above. Sometimes on larger bids, it really helps me find my target. Also, searching stock archives and seeing their pricing can help give you a gauge of where you should look to put your decimal in the amount. Note: do not look at Microstock for pricing. Microstock is sold over and over, and isn’t exclusive. Getting estimated rates there will only make you sad.

I promise I’m not sponsored by them. It has just been a lifesaver!

After you determine what your pricing should be, issue a PSD estimate and send it to the client. Use a friendly, but professional tone, explaining your rate and the terms of use. Ask them if they have any questions. Often they will come back with either a, “This sounds great!” or a, “This is outside our budget.” If it’s outside their budget, respond with, “Let me see if I can work within your budget. What is your range for this placement?” and most certainly they will come back with a dollar sum that is much more then that t-shirt.

It is now up to you, if the price is right for your business.

Warmest regards and Happy Bidding,
Courtney Dailey

You can see more of Courtney’s work at CourtneyDailey.com, check out her coaching website at PhotoBeautyCoach.com, and follow her on InstagramTwitter and Facebook. If you’d like to learn from her in person, you can register for her upcoming Las Vegas workshop, Wondergloss! Use the promo code GLOSS to save $200 when you register!

The views and opinions expressed in the Guest Blog series are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Scott Kelby or Kelby Media Group.