Monday
Oct
2013
28

Here’s What’s Going On This Week

by Scott Kelby  |  6 Comments

Check out this quick “helicopter fly-over” of my seminar
The folks from IntelligentUAS & DJI Innovations were at my seminar on Friday in Washington DC and did a flyover of the seminar crowd using a DJI Phantom (with Zenmuse H3-2D and GoPro Hero 3+). I love that overhead video view. Too cool!

I’m on my way, today!
I’m teaching my “Shoot Like a Pro” Seminar there tomorrow at the Hynes Convention Center. Over 500 Boston-area photographers have already signed up, and if you want to come too, it’s not too late: Here’s the link: http://bit.ly/14bAUDJ

Next Stop: New York City on Thursday, November 14th.

I’ll be back for “The Grid” on Wednesday
I’m heading home right after my seminar on Tuesday, so I’ll be back for live airing of “The Grid” on Wednesday. Matt had a really good topic for this week….I just wish I could remember what it was, but I do remember thinking, “Man, that would make a great topic!” so make sure you tune in to see if I was right  (LOL!). It’s this Wednesday at 4:00 pm ET (New York Time) at http://www.kelbytv.com/thegrid 

What will photography look like 10 years from now?
PC Magazine did a nice write-up on the Photo Plus Expo industry panel I was part of on Wednesday night where we tackled that very question. Here’s a link if you’ve got a sec: http://bit.ly/1g3BbNi

Here’s one for Lightroom users
I get a bunch of questions about managing your images and folders in Lightroom, and Matt just did a really great, short, to the point video about it in his “Lightroom Killer Tips” show, and I included it right here (above).

Don’t Miss Wednesday’s Guest Blog
This week, we welcome Washington DC-based photographer John Harrington, and he has some really pragmatic business advice for photographers on working within a client’s budget (and determining what that budget really is). It’s a really insightful post and you don’t’ want to miss it this Wednesday right here.

That’s it for Monday. I’m off to Boston, and I hope I’ll get the chance to meet you there! Cheers (no Boston pun intended). ;-)

Friday
Oct
2013
25

Check This Out This Deal From Amazon: Buy Lightroom 5, Get My Lightroom 5 Book Free!

by Scott Kelby  |  3 Comments

This is pretty sweet deal, but it’s only good until November 3rd — you get Lightroom 5 and the PRINT version of my Lightroom 5 book for Digital Photographers (which normally sells for $38 even with the Amazon discount)  for FREE (whoo hoo!).

I wish I could take credit for this deal, but this is Amazon’s doin’, but I’m psyched they did it.

Here’s the link (click here), to take advantage of Amazon’s free Lightroom 5 book deal.

Thursday
Oct
2013
24

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  28 Comments

Scott Kelby at Photo Plus Expo
I know Scott covered this the other day, but I (Brad) just wanted to remind you of his schedule at Photo Plus Expo this week. He’ll be talking about sports photography in the Canon booth this afternoon at 2:30pm, and again on Saturday at 11:30am. If you’re there, make sure you stop by to see him! There are plenty of other amazing speakers (like our friends Greg Heisler, Peter Read Miller, Jack Reznicki, Vincent Laforet, Bruce Dorn, John Paul Caponigro, Tyler Stableford and others), so you can come by at any time and see some great people and images!

Freeze Motion Photography
This week’s free KelbyTraining.com class is Freeze Motion Photography with Frank Doorhof! The class just started airing yesterday and will run through October 30. All you have to do is go to KelbyTraining.com/onair and sign up for a free account, then click play! Of course, if you want to watch all of the other classes any time you want, you can always sign up for a KelbyTraining.com subscription ;-)

You can also leave a comment here for your chance to win a 1-month subscription!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNallyMatt Kloskowski, or RC Concepcion? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
Oct 25 – Washington, DC
Oct 29 – Boston, MA
Nov 14 – New York, NY

One Flash, Two Flash with Joe McNally
Oct 30 – Orlando, FL
Nov 13 – Los Angeles, CA
Nov 18 – South San Francisco, CA

Lightroom 5 Live with Matt Kloskowski
Nov 6 – Fort Lauderdale, FL
Nov 15 – Sacramento, CA

Photoshop for Photographers with RC Concepcion
Nov 1 – Phoenix, AZ

Lots more dates have been added for the rest of the year, so head over to the Kelby Training Live site to get the full schedule! Don’t forget, if you register for a seminar at least 14 days in advance, you can save $10 by using the code KTL10 at the checkout. And leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Last Week’s Winners
KelbyTraining.com Subscription
-Leslie

Kelby Training Live Ticket
-KC

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

Wednesday
Oct
2013
23

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Tim Boyles!

by Brad Moore  |  13 Comments


Fishing from a kayak in the Florida Keys with a GoPro camera

There is nothing like securing a contract to photograph an event like the one I was blessed with in June.

Nik Wallenda was going to walk a high wire across the Grand Canyon, untethered, and the Discovery Channel was going to broadcast it to more than 200 countries with an estimated viewership of 200 million people.


Nik Wallenda walks a high wire across the Grand Canyon June 24, 2013

I had been hired to document the event, Nik’s family and friends who were there, and add to the already-vast Wallenda family legacy, archives and heirlooms. I would also feed to Getty Images.


Nik Wallenda gestures into the abyss on the first day of on-site training.


Nik sits on the edge of the Canyon at sunrise on the first day of on-site training.

All in all, it would be a demanding, pressure-filled shoot, four-day shoot, yet with a built-in cushion: Great visuals guaranteed. How could it get better?

By taking my near-80 year old father along.


Dad made friends easily. He laughs with Jack Hanna’s wife, Suzi, at the Grand Canyon within five minutes of meeting her

Nik Wallenda is a nice, kind, sweet, friendly, talented, charming, devoted family man. I didn’t steal that line from any press release. I learned it on my own. This year he let me photograph him nearly a dozen different times.


Nik Wallenda walks a high wire over downtown Sarasota on January 29, 2013


Nik Wallenda poses holding a piece of the cable he used to walk a high wire over Niagara Falls February 15,2013

His family is always there. Most times it’s the physcial presence of his wife and three children, his mother and father and many other family and close friends who rig his cables, handle his media calls, guarantee his safety and hundreds of other details that go along with being part of the most recognized high-wire family in history.

Always present is the shadow of his great-grandfather, Karl Wallenda, and others who carved out history in the 200 years the Wallendas have been performing.


Nik’s wife Erendira (Left) and his sister, Lijana, share a hug after the Grand Canyon walk.

I really like breaking rules. The big one on this trip, if Nik would allow it, would be to bring my father along. It’s not professional to have family and friends along on shoots. We all know that.


Nik Wallenda tugs on the wire that he’ll use to walk across the Grand Canyon during a training session two days before the actual walk.

When I thought about Nik’s devotion to family and legacy, I couldn’t help but think how great it would be to have my 78-year-old father, Marvin, along with me. He was a truck driver for most of his adult life. He’d never seen a TV stage in real life, much less one that crossed the Grand Canyon. But, he is in good shape, he is warm, smart, funny, charming and very sweet. He is devoted to his family.

He is much like Nik, in other words. I had to ask.

“Nik, can I bring my dad along?” I wrote in an email two weeks before our journey was to begin. ”I’d be honored to have your dad along,” Nik wrote back.


With Nik in the backround, my father Marvin and I pose for a photograph. Photo by Thomas Bender

So, for three of those days, my father was at my side as we followed Nik Wallenda and his family and crew to press conferences, training sessions, meet and greets with fans, rehearsals, meals, horseshoes and hijinks, and finally to Sunday, the day Nik was going to create history and put his life on the line in front of 200 million people on live television.


Nik Wallenda walks a high wire across the Grand Canyon

My father became a minor celebrity himself along the way. His hometown newspaper, The Altoona Mirror, wrote a story. Dad said he couldn’t go anywhere without people asking him about his trip with Nik Wallenda to the Grand Canyon.

He developed a true friendship with Jack and Suzi Hanna who invited dad to visit them at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. (We went this month)


I never asked Nik to pose with my father until the after-party. Dad was tired. We had been working together for about 12 hours by the time this photo was taken.

I think a lot of people were moved about seeing my father and I hanging out together at the biggest event in the world.

Two other photojournalists there told me they had lost their own fathers recently. One teared up, I believe from the wish that he could have been in my sooty shoes, with his own father. I was reminded how blessed to have mine there.

The successes were huge. Nik finished the record-breaking walk despite immense heat, windy updrafts from the Canyon floor, slippery desert dust on the wire and a thousand other challenges he and his team faced and conquered.


Nik blows a kiss to his wife and children as he nears the end of his historic high wire walk.

My dad and I had a great time, bonding and making memories and photographs that will be around long after we’re all are gone. One thing I didn’t plan on, but was incredibly satisfied to find out: Not only did I add to and enhance the Wallenda family heirlooms and legacies, but those of my own family as well.


My father and I at the Grand Canyon. Photo by Douglas Hay


iPhone close-up of Nik’s autograph on the 16×20″ I printed for my father.


iPhone shot of note we received from Jack and Suzi Hanna. I sent them a 20×30″ print of their choice. He said he wanted it signed. I told him, “you know Nik, you ask him to sign it.” He said, “I want you to sign it.”


Show hosts Willie Geist and Natalie Morales pose with Nik at sunrise on the morning after the walk.


Nik back on the wire at sunrise on the morning after the walk.

Thank you to Scott Kelby, David Hobby and Joe McNally for showing me the light.

Thank you to Nik Wallenda for saying yes to just about anything I ever asked him and for always giving me something interesting to shoot.

Thank you to my Jack and Suzi Hanna for treating my father like he’s the most important man in the world.

Thank you to my father, Marvin, for always having a sense of adventure and my mother for things I could never put into words.

You can see more of Tim’s work at TimBoylesPhotography.com, and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

Tuesday
Oct
2013
22

My Speaking Schedule This Week at Photo Plus Expo in New York (and in DC on Friday)

by Scott Kelby  |  8 Comments

I’ve got a busy week coming up, and I hope at some point along the way you’re a part of it. :-) [Photo above by Bede McCarthy].

WEDNESDAY
Tomorrow I’m speaking on a panel with a very interesting topic: on the future of photography

THURSDAY
Canon has invited me to speak in their booth theater on one of my favorite topics: Sports Photography, and it’s open to anyone at the Expo, so come on by — I’m on at 2:30 pm (I’d love to get to meet you in person, so if you come by, make sure you come up and say “hi”). Here’s the schedule for all the instructors and Canon Explorers of Light teaching in Canon’s theater:

Note: On Friday, Peter Read Miller is speaking at 1:00 pm. I’ll be out-of-town on Friday but that’s one I wouldn’t have missed. Also if I were there that day, I’d be sure not to miss Greg Heisler — he is really amazing (and a terrific speaker).

FRIDAY
On Friday I fly down to Washington DC for my “Shoot Like a Pro” Tour there at the Washington DC Convention Center. Over 600 photographers are spending the day with me on Friday, why not come along? Here’s the link to grab your seat and we’ll see you on Friday.

SATURDAY
On Saturday I’m back at Photo Plus Expo for my Canon booth presentation at 11:00 am, and then I’m headed back home to take a quick breather (Whew!) before I head to Boston for my Shoot Like a Pro tour there on Tuesday (here’s the link if you want to come and join me).

It’s a busy week, but I’m really looking forward to it, and for the chance to meet you in person, so I hope if you see me anywhere this week (NYC or DC), you’ll stop me and say “hi.” See you somewhere soon! :-)

 

 

Monday
Oct
2013
21

It was a Football Shootin’, Remote Firein’ Weekend!

by Scott Kelby  |  82 Comments

This weekend, I had absolutely one of my most-fun football weekends ever, covering the University of Tennessee Vols big upset win against the South Carolina Gamecocks in Knoxville, Tennessee on Saturday and then right after the game flying over to Atlanta to shoot with the Falcons crew for Sunday’s game. It doesn’t get much better than that!

Today, I’ll cover Saturday’s game and the two locations we mounted remote cameras. I called my buddy “Big Daddy” Don Page (the head of sports photography for UT) and asked if there was any chance of us mounting a camera on the Goal Post itself. I often see video cameras mounted up there, but so far I haven’t seen any still cameras, so I thought it was worth a shot. Don worked on it, and sure enough — on Friday we got the go-ahead, with the warning that the camera or lens absolutely could not cross the plane of the goal post which could interfere with the game (and we would make darn sure it wouldn’t).

 For me, there are two main reasons to use remote cameras: 

(1) To let you cover two or more locations at one time. For example, when I shoot Major League Baseball, I’ll cover the batter myself, but I have a remote camera aimed right at 2nd base, so if something happens there I’ve got it covered with the 2nd camera.

 (2) But mostly for me, it’s to give me angles and views from places either I can’t shoot (like with the Falcons, right up next to the smoke and fire pyrotechnics when the player intros happens right before the game, or hanging from the truss the players run out through), or in our case, a Goal Post came up high aiming down right at the 5-yard line with a wide angle lens. I totally dig this stuff! :)

My Loadout
We packed four Canon 1DXs, a slew of lenses for the trip (long and wide), and a Pelican case full of remote rigging gear for the trip.  This was going to be challenging since two of my flights this weekend would be on Delta CRJ-900 Regional Jets with small overhead bins. I took a Thinktank Photo Airstream Roller, which is like the Airport International but about half the height. It’s an amazing bag because it looks so small, but holds so much (Two 1Dx-bodies; a 70-200mm f/2.8, a 24-105 f/4, a 8-15mm fisheye zoom, a black rapid strap, my card reader, my backup drive, a Hoodman Loupe, memory cards, misc cables AND my 15” laptop and my iPad in the outer sleeve PLUS, my full-sized Gitzo Monopod. That is one amazing little bag, and believe it or not, it slides right under the seat in front of me on that small regional jet (the flight from Atlanta was only 24 minutes, so having a little less legroom was no big deal).

I carried my Canon 400mm f/2.8 in a soft-sided Lightware bag, and son-of-a-gun if it didn’t fit perfectly in the overhead bin of both the CRJ-900 and the smaller CRJ-200 on my way back to Atlanta (seen above right). I checked the Pelican case (with a TSA-approved lock) as baggage along with my overnight bag with clothes (and I tossed my gel-filled knee pads as well in there).


Above: That’s Randy and this custom-made goalpost rig (see the metal bands?). 

The Goal Cam
We got to the stadium really early because we realized that the goalpost was MUCH thicker than how wide a Manfrotto Magic Arm clamp would fit, and so Don called his buddy Randy Sartin, who shoots for USA Today Sports Images and is really clever at coming up with solutions to problems like this. On Friday night he went to Lowes and bought two large metal bands (the kind you would use on a dryer hose or indoor plumbing) that you can tighten with a screwdriver, and he connected those (somehow) to a Manfrotto Magic Arm. You can see the metal bands in the shot above.

Above: That’s “Big Daddy” Don Page flashing a classic Big Daddy “I’m up on a laddar” smirk

We pulled our a big ladder (at 7:30 am) and Randy got it attached to the goal, then Brad Moore (who came on the trip with me to help out, and to visit family in his hometown while he was there), scampered up that ladder and mounted a 1Dx up there with a 24-70mm f/2.8, and we used Auto Focus to focus it on the 5-yard line (at around f/8) and then once focused, we switched the lens to Manual Focus and used gaffer’s tape to make sure it didn’t move.

Above: That’s Randy, me and Brad testing the remote after it’s in place. 

Above: I cannot begin to explain this shot of Brad, taken by Brad (note the PocketWizard in his right hand).

Above: Here’s a close-up look at the rig (Randy added a GoPro camera on top to make a time-lapse video). You can’t tell very well from this angle, but the camera is well behind the plane of the goal post.

We would leave the camera there all game, but we’d also get the big player entrance as they take the field (and leave the field) from right behind that goalpost, so it was the perfect place to position it.

Above: Here’s the goal post cam of the players taking the field.

The camera was up and running by 8:00 am, so we went up to the roof of the stadium where I shot some fisheye shots of the empty stadium (it was scary as anything up there for someone like myself who has a fear of heights). On our way down to the field, we passed right over the tunnel where the players stack up right before they take the field and I took a fisheye shot of it empty, and showed it to Donald and said “Ya know, we’ve got another camera, and a couple more Manfrotto Magic Arms” and about an hour or so before kickoff, we mounted that camera, with the fish-eye set to 15mm on a railing above the tunnel. So, when I fired my camera, it would fire both the goalpost cam and the tunnel cam.

Above: Here’s the tunnel remote cam right as the players take the field. The two cameras both fire simultaneously when I fire my camera, or press the “test” button on the PocketWizard.

We used PocketWizard Plus IIIs to trigger these remotes, which are just perfect for stuff like this (with a 300+ foot range) and they are just so easy to work with and incredibly reliable. You just need a cable that goes from the remote into your camera’s sync port, and you find the exact right cable that works with your camera using the free cable-finder widget on the PocketWizard site. Works like a charm.

After the players took the field, Brad quickly removed the remote and the rest of game I just kept a PocketWizard Plus III in my pocket, and when the play got near the end zone, I’d fire shots with it, no matter where I was in the stadium.

Field Camera Gear & Settings
I used pretty much the same gear I’ve been using all season: two Canon 1Dx’s with a 400mm f/2.8 on my main body (with a 1.4 tele-extender attached most of the game) supported by a Gitzo monopod, and a 70-200mm f/2.8 on my 2nd body. Canon sent me this loaner gear at the beginning of the season, and I already let them know not to expect it back any time soon LOL!! (and by soon, I mean not until well after football season. 2015). ;-)

Above: I do this when I get sleepy. ;-)

At the beginning of the season a friend at Canon who shoots sports too asked if I’d like to try out some of their gear, and ever since their 1Dx came out (and my buddies from the Falcons all shoot the 1Dx and just rave about it), I’ve been anxious to see if it’s “all that.” Well, I can tell you, “it’s all that” and then some. So much so, that for shooting sports I’ve totally switched over to Canon (in a related note, I saw my buddy pro-sports shooter Paul Abell [who guest blogged here my blog] at the Falcons game yesterday and I noticed he had switched over to Canon as well).

Anyway, I haven’t had much time with Canon’s other bodies, just my trip to Rome using a 5D Mark III, and I’m still getting used to using it, but it’s been a lot of fun trying out some goodies. I also tried out some Sony gear at a studio shoot last month which was really interesting, but I didn’t get to shoot with it long enough to get used to the electronic viewfinder.

At some point, I’ll do either a video review or an in-depth blog post about the 1Dx and Canon lenses, because there’s a lot I want to share about why that body was born for shooting sports, but this week I’m off to Photo Plus Expo in New York, and then my Washington DC seminar on Friday, and then back to NYC on Saturday (whew!), and then off to Boston for another tour date on Monday, and well…it’s gonna be a few weeks, at earliest.

Canon did invite me to do a presentation in their booth about shooting sports at Photo Plus Expo this week, so if you’re in NYC, I’m on stage at the Canon booth at 2:30 pm on Thursday, and at 11:00 am on Saturday, so I’ll hope you stop by, so I can meet you in person (I haven’t been on stage at Photo Plus Expo since 2010 so it’s exciting to be back, and my thanks to Canon for the invitation to talk about one of my favorite topics).

What was especially exciting about all this though, was the game itself. For the past two years I’ve been only  shooting NFL games which are great, don’t get me wrong, but the traditions of college football, and the passion of the fans is really something special, and something I have definitely missed, so it was great to get swept up in it all again. When the game came down to a last-second field goal for a big upset Vols win, the place just erupted into celebration that was beyond those even any college bowl game I’ve covered, and that was just amazing, since I was right in the middle of all of it. I have had special access to the locker room after the game, and that was just insane!!! A really amazing experience.

At the end of the game, when the Vols lined up for the last-second kick, instead of covering the kick (which I knew they had covered by the other team photographers), I turned and focused on the Vols bench and I figured I’d know whether the kick was good or not based on their reaction, and either good or bad it would still have the makings of a interesting story-telling shot. The kick was good, and the players exploded off the bench to rush the field, where I got the shots you see above.

I haven’t had a chance to process all the images yet (I sent some to the Vols that they needed right away), and I I’m working on more Falcons stuff today, and I’ll share those as soon as I can, but since I did some different stuff with remotes from this game, I wanted to share those here today.

Above: A really great moment when Coach Jones jumps up on the podium and directs the UT Marching Band in a rousing chorus of the Vols fight song “Rocky Top” — the place was just going nuts!!!

Above: I was able to fight my way through the sea of players and photographers and video camera crew to get this shot from the front side. 

Above: Go Vols! 

Here’s wishing you call an awesome Monday (well, as awesome as a “monday” can be anyway).

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