The reason I’m embarrassed is – this Photoshop portrait retouching tip for quickly reducing shiny hot spots on your subject’s face, was sent to me by John Weigley, a reader of my books – but it’s not the fact that he sent me the tip (I absolutely love it when readers send me cool tips. In fact, I shared another one from a reader today over at LightroomKillerTips), but what I’m embarrassed about is that I just found his message this weekend. That doesn’t sound all that bad, until you realize he sent it to me in 2004. Ack!

So, before I go into the video (below), I owe John a very, very belated thanks for sharing this tip with me, so I could share it today (some 12 years later) with you.

https://youtu.be/9cjOtVQvSPw

Hope you find that helpful (and thanks again to John for sharing the tip in the first place).

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Wanna spend three days immersing yourself in learning Photoshop inside and out? Come and join us out in Las Vegas, July 19-21st at the Photoshop World 2016 Conference. You’ll learn more in three days than you have in three years. Here’s the link with details – get your tickets now and save $100 bucks. 

Mornin’ everybody. Here’s another one of those hidden little things that Adobe snuck into Photoshop CC kind of under the radar in one of those periodic CC feature updates.

Believe it or not this one was added back in 2014 but it’s hard to find someone that actually realizes it’s there. It’s a built-in filter for creating all sorts of frames around an image. Here’s how it works:

photoframe1

Go under the Filter menu, under Render, and choose Picture Frame. If you just said, “What?! …Picture Frame?! Where did that come from…” you’re not alone.

photoframe2

Here’s the Frame window. From the frame pop-up menu you can choose 40-something different frame types from the awesome to the absurd. The more traditional looking frames are toward the bottom of the menu, like this art frame shown above. Depending on which frame style you choose there are a bunch of sliders to tweak it to your heart’s content.

photoframe3a

I create a new blank layer before I open the filter, so I can resize the frame after it renders using Free Transform. I also added a soft drop shadow here just to add some depth.

I hope that started your week off with something new to mess around with in Photoshop, here’s wishing you your best week of the year (so far). :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Hey, if you’re a photographer in the Portland, Oregon area – I’ll be there next week (on Thursday I believe) with my Shoot Like a Pro: Part 2 (reloaded!) seminar. Hope you can come out and join me. 

https://youtu.be/ovS3OhtJ6ks

Hey gang – it’s Friday (yay!) I’m back with another “Photoshop Finishing Move” that picks up right where my brand new “Start to Finish in Lightroom” (that I posted over at LightroomKillerTips.com just today – here’s the link), left off.

This one is a technique I use to take the “edge” off sharp images, and I get asked about this “look” a lot (the question usually is “How is it that some of your images have a soft look but they’re still really sharp?” Well, this is how I do it (no plug-ins, no-presets – just simple Photoshop stuff).

Hope you find that helpful, and here’s wishing you a fantastic weekend! :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. If you’re a KelbyOne member, just a heads up: we are taking the site down tonight at 11:30 pm EDT for a scheduled maintenance. It should be back up Saturday morning. We’re doing this maintenance to help give our members a better, more stable experience (we’re moving to an awesome new server platform) and it will bring us all lots of happy goodness and love, but to get the love, we have to do this maintenance thing first, so hang in there with us – a better experience is on its way. Thanks for your patience (and for the love. We all need love). :)

https://youtu.be/9m5IQEaQEF8

Photo Recipes: Beauty Headshots with Scott Kelby
Join Scott Kelby for the second installment in his Photo Recipes series with a focus on beauty headshots! Scott takes you through the entire process, from discussing his gear to setting up the lights, and from getting the shots to retouching the final images.

This very popular beauty lighting look is easy to pull off and it works for both men and women. Whether you are using studio strobes or speedlights, Scott shows the light modifiers you’ll need, how to position them, and how to work with your subjects to nail the shots you need.

Scott wraps up the class by showing you his approach to processing the photos from the shoot along with a demonstration of some of his favorite finishing moves to make the photos look their best. Check it out now at KelbyOne.com!

https://youtu.be/b9RLN2qcsWE

It’s “Throwback Thursday!”
Check out this awesome class already on KelbyOne you might have missed. It’s Mastering Beauty Lighting & Fashion for Portrait Photography with Joel Grimes!

IMG_5741

“Lend me your eyes and I’ll show you what I see.” – Hybrid Dave, 2013 (fact). I’m Dave Williams and I’m a photographer from London, England. I shoot travel and people (which I realise is very broad!) I scour the world for photographic opportunities which will inspire, evoke memories, and make money!

DSC_0073

Telling an accomplished, professional photographer that their photographs look good based on the camera they use or the natural beauty of the subject they’re shooting is akin to telling a painter that their canvasses look good based on the skill of their brush. You just wouldn’t. A photographer who is successful puts a lot of work into their images, but what is that work in my mind? What’s my thought process? That’s what I’ve decided to write about for Scott’s blog the week.

8985633241_038ef31119_o

What I see in my minds eye will end up on the screen or the wall in front of you, no two ways about it. It’s those photos on that screen, or those photos in the dusty photo album you’ve pulled out of the attic in 50 years time to blow the dust off and show the grandkids which will evoke the memory of that one moment. Long after the dance has been had, the champagne has been drunk, the glacier has melted, the sun has long since set over the horizon, that memory will come to the forefront of your mind and you’ll be taken back to it in time, along with the sudden recollection of a lost memory of the 2 minutes either side of that photo being taken. The sights, sounds and smells, the emotions, they’ll all come back to life.

25001274841_e7f330d318_o

I’ll make it happen over and over again, and you won’t remember it unless I take that photo in such a way that the composition, timing, lighting and all other elements are skillful, creative and artistic enough to capture that moment precisely. You may not remember it unless I take the photo. The snapshots of time I can make happen through skilled consideration of angle, composition, exposure, lighting, aperture, timing, they are memories. My job is to take all those elements, package them up carefully, and then put them into the shot for everyone to see and it’s something that’s been tried and perfected over years.

IMG_5735

Forget composition, that’s been overcooked now. Let’s look at what happens inside us. Why do photos work? How do they release the chemicals in our mind that makes us feel a certain way? I’ve been working on this piece for a while now, and a fair chunk of research has gone into figuring out the link between photographic art and human emotion. Photography is powerful. It captures a real life event, as opposed to an imagined or otherwise represented painting.

24799015480_a011bd9bbe_o

It allows us, as photographers, to put people into our eye and our mind. It allows people to see the world from our perspective. One of my favourite photographic lines is, ‘lend me your eyes and I’ll show you what I see.’ More than this though, we use photography to understand ourselves in relation to everything and everyone around us. We can place ourselves into the perspective of those we see in the image.

IMG_3999

Our ability to identify with someone else’s point of view is deeply ingrained in the architecture of our brain. We can imagine what they are seeing. Photography plays a unique role in triggering the region of the brain that controls empathy. To understand how photographs activate this brain network, it’s first necessary to deconstruct emotional processing into simpler components. One of the most fundamental social skills that humans have, that of imitation, is key here. Imitation is automatic and a basic requirement for developing practical social skills, like empathy.

10672322675_1efcb3608a_o

When we see the expression of other peoples faces there is an unconscious activation of the same muscles. We’ve all heard of this, it’s been studied time and time again and comes into play daily on conscious and sub-conscious levels and in all our interactions. It’s the key player in the dating game. If you like someone you’ll copy them, and similarly they’ll copy you if they like you back. Imitation is a result of visual information combining with muscle activation, which in turn facilitates empathy.

10349797593_eaf539dc48_o

Our capacity to imitate is thought to rely upon a specialised network of brain regions called the human mirror neutron system. With a simple photograph our brain will unconsciously processes biological motion, attend to where emotions are being directed, activate muscles of those we are observing, and transmits this information to language processing centres where we can consciously express our own emotional reaction.

IMG_5739

Imitation is a basic social skill that often occurs unconsciously due to the learning we’ve been doing all our life. However, as we age we become much more aware of someone’s emotions not by direct observation by rather by judging their intent. Intent requires us to place ourselves into someone else’s perspective and to hold the belief that other people have minds that are distinct from our own. The mind is something we cannot see and thus we must believe that it exists in theory.

IMG_5740

Photography is important because it can influence our capacity to empathise, it affects our motivation to help others, and help us connect with people through imitation. Seeing children at war, viewing a familiar scene we’ve never actually seen in real life, watching the total destruction of cities undoubtedly appeal to our emotions and our yearning to interact and feel we have an involvement in the image. The very survival of our species has and still relies on understanding how other feel, attending to the needs of those around us, and working with one another to construct a better society.

IMG_3858

Photography is more important than ever because we need visual imagery that reflects our connectedness, especially in a world that is as dynamic as ours with a constant daily bombardment of visual stimulus in the digital world. The way we see is unique to each and every one of us, but the common theme is empathy and this can be generated in the capture of a good photograph. Not just through composition, but in content. The capture of the emotion in front of the lens. In terms of my specialist field, travel photography, I want each and every person to feel the love that goes into my photos.

To see more of Dave’s work, check out HybridDave.com, and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr.

cdown

Hey gang – just a quick update for what’s new and going on at the upcoming Photoshop World 2016 Conference in Las Vegas this summer, July 19-21, 2016:

(1) CALL FOR ENTRIES: The Photoshop World Guru Awards
This is a photo/image competition just for people who attend the conference (so your odds of winning in a category are pretty decent), and there are categories for everything from illustration to retouching to compositing, and entry is free to any registered attendee (and entry is only for registered attendees). The official rules and form for uploading your images to the competition are right here. Good luck! (btw: if you’re on the fence about entering, read this post from Photoshop World Instructor Corey Barker about how his career changed after winning a Guru Award back when he was an attendee – here’s that link).

https://youtu.be/priPeOvZH3o

(2) We have an incredible roster of instructors this year!
Along with some very familiar faces, we’ve got some up-and-coming star instructors that you are absolutely going to love learning from. Take a look at this year’s instructor dream team (below):

instrs

(3) Join us for “An Evening With Gregory Heisler”
We’re doing something very cool this year — and it’s an evening you’ll never forget with one of the most respected, engaging, and captivating presenters of our time, and author of the critically acclaimed 50 Portraits: Stories and Techniques from a Photographer’s Photographer (seen below), Mr. Gregory Heisler. You’ve seen Gregory’s iconic portraits of A-list celebrities, athletes, and even Presidents countless times on covers of Time magazine, GQ, Sports Illustrated, Esquire, and ESPN among others, and now he brings those images and stories to life on stage for an evening of inspiration, laughter, and art — you are going to just love it.

gregbook

(4) Free re-broadcast of our Alumni-only Webcast
Last week we did a live Webcast (hosted by Larry Becker and me), about all the new things coming to Photoshop World this year (and there’s plenty).  This webcast was just for folks who have already been to Photoshop World before, so we don’t talk about “what is Photoshop World” because they already know – instead it’s all about what’s different, what’s new, what’s the buzz this year, and stuff like that. It was a lot of fun, and we had tons of interaction from the viewing audience. If you missed it, you can watch the rebroadcast right now at this link. 

alumnicast3

(5) Corey & Vanelli on Photoshop World
While I was on the road, we did something very dangerous — we turned the Grid over to Photoshop World’s Official Mascot, the one and only “Vanelli” (but we had Corey Barker join him to make sure the train didn’t run off the tracks), and I have to say — they nailed it. They totally nailed the Photoshop World experience, and if you’ve been thinking on any level of going, watch this episode (below), and you’ll totally “get it.”

https://youtu.be/U_IIpIDlLP0

(6) If you’re going, better book your rooms NOW!!!!
We’ve got special discount room rates for our attendees, right at the resort where Photoshop World is held (and where our staff and instructors stay); the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino right on the Vegas strip. We have a limited number of rooms at our discounted rate, and when they’re gone…they’re gone, so reserve your room now. Here’s the link with details.

mand

(7) Here’s why you gotta go!
It’s just 30-seconds long (below), but you’ll see why you gotta join us this summer in Vegas:

https://youtu.be/tnpOIvXcZpI

That’s it for this Photoshop World Conference 2016 update! :)

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Tomorrow is “Blind Photo Critique Day” on The Grid with our in-studio guest, lifestyle portrait photographer Erik Valind. Submit your “portrait photos” for critique at this link right here, and we’ll see you tomorrow at 4pm EDT for the show at http://kelbytv.com/thegrid

 

 

 

Close