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  • If you're shooting sports with a Nikon D3, D700 or D300, you're probably shooting fairly often in high-speed continuous mode, so you want the best performance (most number of frames per second) possible. Well, if you're shooting with a VR (Vibration Reduction) lens, once your shutter speed gets above 1/500 of a second, you should turn VR off to avoid any shutter lag or slower frame advance rates caused by the VR trying to stabilize the lens. (At high shutter speeds, you don't really need to VR---after all, Vibration Reduction was designed to let you hand hold in low light, slow shutter speed situations. If you're shooting with shutter speeds above 1/500 of a second, you really don't need the VR, eh?). When I'm shooting sports, to freeze action, I generally want my shutter speed to be at least 1/1000 of a second (or…

    Hi everybody. It's Tuesday and 2008 is almost in the bag. Here's what's up: A lot of people have been asking me for an update on how I feel about my Apple MacBook Pro now that I've had it for a while, and basically here's where I'm at: I've gotten over the glossy screen thing. I've calibrated it a few times now and while the glossy screen is a bit more contrasty, it really hasn't caused any problems (and maybe that's because I'm compensating a bit, knowing that my screen looks more contrasty than the final images). My prints from both my Epsons, and from MPIX.com are coming out fine, so the glossy issue isn't as big an issue as I thought (though if I could get this MacBook Pro without the glossy screen----I would). The trackpad is still a real issue for me,…

    Well, let's get this out of the way first. We lost. At home. Miserably. To a team that's only won 4 games all season. We're out of the playoffs. Our season's over. Ugh! I don't want to talk about it. Until next year, of course. Now, onto the shoot. It was a warm beautiful day (as you might imagine; I had a blast) and I have a quick story to share: It's very late in the fourth quarter, we're a touchdown behind with just a minute or two left on the clock. I'm shooting from the sidelines, right near the Buc's bench, and when one of our receivers drops a pass, I look to the guy standing right next to me, and say something along the lines of, "Oh come on--you gotta catch those--it was right in his hands." He looks at me and…

    If you've read this blog for any time at all, you know by now that I often write these posts either late at night, or really early in the morning. You also know that it's not unusal for my posts to have typos, mistakes, and other mishaps that occur when you write blog posts when you're really sleepy (by the way, my mistakes aren't just limited to those two times; I make mistakes all day long). Anyway, last week on my blog, in a December 23rd post about location shooting with the Lastolite EZYBox, I mistakenly called my Nikon 14-24mm lens a "VR" lens (which it is not). Now, generally when I make a mistake like that, one of my readers will usually post something like, "Hey Scott, there's a typo in your post. That lens isn't a VR" and then I'll usually post…

    I'm finishing up the update to, "The Photoshop Elements 7 Book for Digital Photographers," (co-authored with Matt Kloskowski) and each time I update a book, I always use all new photos throughout the book, which means I have to be shooting pretty much all the time (which gives me a great excuse to use with my wife, "Honey, it's for work." ;-) Anyway, I shot a number of new images just for the book, and I thought it would be cool to do an on-location sports portrait of some local kids who play Soccer (which is called football about every place else on the planet). My buddy Jim Workman is president of the local Soccer (football) league and he set-up a shoot for me with a family that had three talented, fun, and really sweet kids. This was my first location shoot with Brad…

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