I thought I’d wrap up 2008 with another embarrassing promo shot of my old 80s disco band, Rumor Hazit (complete with annoying moire pattern). Also, dig the Duran Duran inspired hair, the long coat, and the gloves with the fingers cut out. Sadly, this is what we wore back then, and we thought it was cool. I was so wrong. ;-)

See you back here on Friday, and until then here’s wishing you all a happy, healthy, and prosperous New Year!



If you’re shooting sports with a Nikon D3, D700 or D300, you’re probably shooting fairly often in high-speed continuous mode, so you want the best performance (most number of frames per second) possible.

Well, if you’re shooting with a VR (Vibration Reduction) lens, once your shutter speed gets above 1/500 of a second, you should turn VR off to avoid any shutter lag or slower frame advance rates caused by the VR trying to stabilize the lens. (At high shutter speeds, you don’t really need to VR—after all, Vibration Reduction was designed to let you hand hold in low light, slow shutter speed situations. If you’re shooting with shutter speeds above 1/500 of a second, you really don’t need the VR, eh?).

When I’m shooting sports, to freeze action, I generally want my shutter speed to be at least 1/1000 of a second (or faster), so I know at the beginning of the shoot to turn my VR off. Anyway, I thought that might be helpful to other Nikon sports shooters out there. (Photo above by Eric Kuna).

Hi everybody. It’s Tuesday and 2008 is almost in the bag. Here’s what’s up:

  • A lot of people have been asking me for an update on how I feel about my Apple MacBook Pro now that I’ve had it for a while, and basically here’s where I’m at: I’ve gotten over the glossy screen thing. I’ve calibrated it a few times now and while the glossy screen is a bit more contrasty, it really hasn’t caused any problems (and maybe that’s because I’m compensating a bit, knowing that my screen looks more contrasty than the final images). My prints from both my Epsons, and from are coming out fine, so the glossy issue isn’t as big an issue as I thought (though if I could get this MacBook Pro without the glossy screen—-I would). The trackpad is still a real issue for me, and frankly it drives me nuts about a dozen or more times a day. I wish Apple would give us a way to turn gestures off, but as best I can tell—there is none. The two reasons I decided to stick it out with this model are: (1) The nVidia graphic card makes Photoshop CS4 zoom faster than I’ve ever seen Photoshop go, and (2) I doubt Apple is going back to matte screens, or bringing back a trackpad button, so I’m going to have to get used to it sooner or later, and I might as well just get used to it now. So, that’s where I’m at; I’m not thrilled, but I’m adjusting.
  • Thanks to for including this blog in their list of the Top 100 Photography Blogs. Here’s the link to their full list.
  • Want to see some cool Photoshop post production retouching? (Not so much portrait retouching—just retouching). Check out Ciklopas Photography Studio, and then when you get to their site (click here), click on the Post Production link on the left side of the page, and then toggle through their different projects. Very well done.
  • Dave Cross had my buddy Terry White as his guest last week for his popular “Finish The Sentence” feature. Here’s the link to check it out.
  • This I love: Go check out this Web site for a spa in Aspen, Colorado. They’ve got a pretty darn fabulous landing page presented in a simple, yet dramatic way that I haven’t seen before. Beautiful photography beautifully presented, even if it’s just for a few moments. Worth a quick look (here’s the link).
  • PROGRAMMING NOTE: I’m taking New Years Eve off along with New Years Day, but I’ll be back with more wholesome goodness on Friday the 2nd. Here’s wishing you all a safe, happy, and prosperous New Year!

See you guys next year! :)


Well, let’s get this out of the way first. We lost. At home. Miserably. To a team that’s only won 4 games all season. We’re out of the playoffs. Our season’s over. Ugh! I don’t want to talk about it. Until next year, of course.

Now, onto the shoot. It was a warm beautiful day (as you might imagine; I had a blast) and I have a quick story to share: It’s very late in the fourth quarter, we’re a touchdown behind with just a minute or two left on the clock. I’m shooting from the sidelines, right near the Buc’s bench, and when one of our receivers drops a pass, I look to the guy standing right next to me, and say something along the lines of, “Oh come on–you gotta catch those–it was right in his hands.” He looks at me and nods in agreement. It was Tiger Woods. I kid you not. I had to step back and grab a couple of shots of him, but I didn’t post any here because it would have ruined the story, as you would have recognized him instantly.

Anyway, after I took the shot, I went over to him and said, “I’m having a problem with my short game. I’m hooding my wedge a bit on my backswing, and I was wondering if you had any tips that might help?” (OK, I didn’t really walk over and say that. I had ya though, didn’t I?). Anyway, it was wild seeing him there (I wish I had noticed him earlier, I probably would have at least said “hi”).

GEAR: All shots were taken with a Nikon D3 with a 200-400mm f/4 lens, or a D300 with a 70-200mm 2.8 VR lens. ISO 200 and wide open (at f/4 and f/2.8 respectively, all day). My thanks to Matt May and the Bucs for giving me such a great day that I can nearly overlook the loss. Nearly. (Click on the thumbnails below for a larger image).

So, here are some of my favorite shots from this heartbreaking, season-ending game (and of course, besides the Bucs needing to win this game, to get in the playoffs the Eagles would have also had to beat Dallas. Of course, they did. Double-ugh!).

Photo courtesy of NIkon USA

If you’ve read this blog for any time at all, you know by now that I often write these posts either late at night, or really early in the morning. You also know that it’s not unusal for my posts to have typos, mistakes, and other mishaps that occur when you write blog posts when you’re really sleepy (by the way, my mistakes aren’t just limited to those two times; I make mistakes all day long).

Anyway, last week on my blog, in a December 23rd post about location shooting with the Lastolite EZYBox, I mistakenly called my Nikon 14-24mm lens a “VR” lens (which it is not). Now, generally when I make a mistake like that, one of my readers will usually post something like, “Hey Scott, there’s a typo in your post. That lens isn’t a VR” and then I’ll usually post back saying, “Hey, thanks for catching that” and I go and change it. It’s happened dozens of times.

Well, this time the guy who pointed out my error, added “Is this something they custom made for you?” (knowing it was not). He was kind of being a smart $#% with this  “Is this something they custom made for you” comment, so I thought I’d be a little one back, and added this comment, “Actually, it is a special custom-made version of the 14-24mm Nikon made for me with the VR added (this model isn’t available to the general public, but may be in the future). Happy Holidays! -Scott. I never dreamed that anyone would take me seriously (especially since this wasn’t a blog post—it was just a comment about a post).

Well, my comment turned out to be an even bigger mistake than accidentally saying it was a VR in the first place, because a Nikon rumors site picked up on it, and ran a post called “Is Scott Kelby kidding” which started a long debate about the lens existence (Maybe they actually made it for me, and I slipped up, etc.) and whether wide angles lenses would even need VR, and so on. Then it was picked up over in the forums over at, and the next thing I know I get a call from Nikon because they are getting calls from people who want this new VR lens, which obviously doesn’t exist.

Now, right when all this happened (last week), I went to both site’s forums and immediately posted a comment saying it was my mistake, and my reply was totally a joke, and that there is no 14-24mm VR lens from Nikon; they didn’t custom make one for me (as if), and so on.

So, I’m sorry to Nikon for the trouble, and to anyone who spent more than 30-seconds debating on forums about this. I’m even sorry to the guy I was a smart #%$ to. Totally my fault, and don’t worry—I won’t do anything like that again.

Note: Photo above courtesy of NIkon USA