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Hi gang: When I seriously started using Instagram last year, I decided that I wanted to use it to share just my travel photography (I basically shoot three photo categories: travel, people and sports), and to get the kind of content I want to have one there (rather than just random shots from my iPhone’s built-in camera) that meant sharing images I’ve taken with my DSLR, and while that seems like a simple thing to do, it’s a bit clunkier than you’d think, which is probably why I get so many questions on what my workflow actually is, so that’s what I’m sharing here today.

Now, I will tell you this – my workflow is constantly evolving, and the one I’m using now I learned from my buddy Terry White (from Adobe), and it works like a charm as long as you’re a Lightroom user, so I’ll share my current workflow first, then I’ll share a workflow that is clunkier, but you can use without using Lightroom. Here we go:

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STEP ONE: The travel images I want to post to Instagram are already on my desktop computer, in my Lightroom CC catalog, so I created a collection with the final images I want to post to Instagram, and I sync that catalog to Lightroom mobile on my iPhone.

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STEP TWO: In Lighroom Mobile on my iPhone, I go to that sync’d collection; click on the image I want to share to Instagram (it’s already tweaked, sharpened and ready to go if it’s in that collection), then (1) I tap the Share icon at the top right corner of Lightroom Mobile, but I don’t choose “Share” from the pop-up menu that appears — (2) choose “Open In” (because you’ll need to open this selected image in the Instagram App).

NOTE: you can actually make this just a three-tap process by tapping and holding on the thumbnail of the image you want to post while you’re in the collection view and that menu you see above pops right now. You can watch a short video of how this works over on our YouTube page today (the video is only 24-seconds I believe). Here’s the link. 

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STEP THREE: When you do this, a list of apps open that you can open your selected image in; choose “Copy to Instagram” as shown above.

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STEP FOUR: Now your image from Lightroom Mobile appears in Instagram and you’re ready go to.

NON-LIGHTROOM WORKFLOW
This is the clunky workflow I was using before – you don’t need Lightroom Mobile for it, but it takes a few steps. Here goes:

(1) Find the JPEG image on your computer that you want to share to Instagram.

(2) Save that image into either Dropbox (if you’re a subscriber) or if you’re a Mac user using iCloud, save your image to iCloud Drive (this is what I used to do).

(3) Now go to the iCloud Drive app on your iPhone – click on the image you want to use; click “Download to View” then tap the Share button and choose Save Image. This saves your image to your iPhone’s Camera Roll.

(4) Lastly, launch the Instagram app; click the “new” post button and the first image that appears is the one you just saved and now you can share it to Instagram.

Whew that was a lot of steps (and you can see why, if you have Lightroom Mobile, it’s a whole lot easier).

Hope you found that helpful on some level, and we’ll see ya tomorrow!

Best,

-Scott

P.S. Hey, I’m coming to Seattle and Portland next week with my seminar. Hope I’ll see you there. 

Happy Friday, everybody. OK, before we look at this tutorial, you should probably look at this tutorial. It’s one I wrote today over at the other site I write – LightroomKillertips.com and it’s on how I went from the flat out-of-camera original image to the image we’re going to do a finishing move upon in the video you see below. So, if you want to go see how I got to here (without any presets, plug-ins or HDR), here’s that link again.

OK, now onto a Photoshop Finishing move I use often on interior shots like this (it’s super easy to do!).

https://youtu.be/PjYXxm-zNmQ

Hope you found that helpful.

One more thing!
If you missed our Photoshop World Alumni-only Webcast last night, we’re rebroadcasting it at this link (if you haven’t been before, wait for our public “Here’s what Photoshop World” webcast is – this one was just for people who have already been, so we only cover all the cool new things, and not the things new attendees would want to know. Thanks.

Have a great weekend everybody!

Best,

-Scott

PhotographyRockstars

The Secrets To Becoming A Photography Rockstar with Adam Elmakias
Learn how to get started as a concert photographer with Adam Elmakias! Adam is a music photographer based in San Diego who got started in the business at a young age and has learned the ropes from spending time in the trenches with bands on the road, and in all kinds of venues. In this class Adam will teach you all the tools you need to be a successful artist today, from how to get a photo pass to the importance of networking, and from how to build your brand to how to find balance with social media. The photo industry is constantly changing, and one of the most important things you can do is position yourself to be an influencer within your photographic community. Adam addresses all of these points and so much more!

It’s Throwback Thursday!
If you missed this class on KelbyOne, you need to watch it right now! It’s one of the best on the topic anywhere – it’s Daniel Gregory’s class Visual Literacy – it’s just brilliant! (ask anybody’s who has seen it).

https://youtu.be/TDMmOoQWHjk

hurleycruise

Check this out! The one and only Peter Hurley has organized the first ever “Headshot Crew Cruise” this month (on Norwegian Cruise Lines no less), where you cruise with Peter and his guest instructors from NYC down to Bermuda and back, and you learn and laugh and chill from port to port.

The cool thing is — the training part is free — just get your cabin, and you’re “in” to all the live classes.

Here’s a link with the details: https://headshotcrew.com/crewz/

Really cool opportunity to learn and lounge on your way to Bermuda.

Best,

-Scott

Clay-Cook-Ethiopia-3

Throughout my journey to impoverished countries all over the world, one trait has reigned true: warmth. No matter what stressful situation or unknown location we find ourselves, there is always good people we meet among the madness. The old saying goes “A few bad apples spoil the bunch” and I find that to be very true, especially in places that have been riddled with war for decades. Good people are everywhere, even in the darkest of corners of the earth. These good people are responsible for uplifting others and guaranteeing awareness of the problems that many face, every day.

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When I was first offered the opportunity to travel to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia I was really unaware of the problems and issues that plague the city and the country as a whole. On the minimal available information I had been given, it was tough to surround my brain around our mission. There is so little knowledge, I was forced to dive deeper and I only scratched the surface of what I would eventually come to find.

It all started with my friends at Nadus Films and their “Give A Story” grant project. We give a grant to those world-wide foundations that need it most. The grant provides the opportunity to document, capture and provide the right tools, so these initiatives can raise awareness and gain traction for further funding. Our project in Ethiopia focused on a foundation titled “Youth Impact” which provides shelter, food and a solid path for homeless children located in the city of Addis Ababa.

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Due to famine and communist civil war, nearly 60% of Ethiopia, Africa is under the age of 18 and of that demographic nearly 100,000 children are completely homeless and suffer from tremendous injustice. Poverty, addiction, prostitution and disease. Some children, just 6 years of age roaming the streets of the city. There is an extreme lack of leadership, parents and grandparents. It is a country of youth.

I knew the project would involve children who have struggled. Children who have stories and I wanted to tell their story the only way I know how, through imagery. I decided to form a portrait series of homeless street children as well as people that have grown through the Impact program. I wanted to bring the aesthetic of my portrait work blended with a journalistic mood. That style involved creating a custom 3×4 canvas solely designed from the ground up for this series.

Upon arrival at the Youth Impact shelter the initial mood wasn’t shock, but difficulty. The shelter was small, similar to a one floor ranch-style two bedroom home. The front yard was piled with random rusted debris and the back porch was a concrete dorm with open doors and ropes covered in wet clothing. The shelter is completely surrounded by a 10-foot concrete wall which was embedded with shards of glass; an inferior barbwire.

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We didn’t have a system to rig the beautiful 3×4 canvas, so we grabbed what we could from the pile of wreckage on the alley-way next to the Youth Impact shelter, a cracked wooden ladder and trashed twin bed frame. Using a Manfrotto 035 Super Clamp, attached to the backdrop draped over Manfrotto 2983 Adjustable Background Holder Crossbar, we linked the clamp to another Manfrotto 035 Super Clamp and attached it to the debris. Using a combination of Gaff Tape and Zip Ties we secured the bottom of the backdrop to avoid kick up from wind.

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The light setup was simple; a Profoto B2 Location Kit attached to a Manfrotto 026 Swivel Umbrella Adapter which we attached to a Manfrotto 680B Compact Monopod for complete mobility. The Profoto B2 head is modified with a 46” Photo Softlighter II, the softest source of modification I’ve ever used. Luckily, I had two trusted assistants who spoke enough broken English to understand my instructions of feathering the light and keeping the strobe consistently directional opposite the sun.

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Youth Impact has blazed a trail for dozens of successful business men, architects, carpenters and artists. Once homeless, now-adults had been saved through the Youth Impact initiative. I wanted to capture not only the current children living through the shelter, but also these blossoming people who had so much to owe to their mentors. It was a humbling experience to photograph this community that has so much to say, but no voice. Hopefully, this series provides that voice that they so yearn to have.

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Behailu Kassanhun – Orphan, joined Youth Impact, he has since graduated with a College degree and teaches Architecture.

 

 

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Amanual Haile – Orphan, joined Youth Impact at the age of 12, he has since graduated College.
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Genet Fantanhun – Orphan, joined Youth Impact at the age of 14, she has since graduated College and is currently a Elementary School Teacher.

 

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Kidist Tesfaye – Orphan, joined Youth Impact, she has since graduated College and is currently serving at a local hospital as a nurse.

 

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Yemisrach Tesfaye – Orphan, joined Youth Impact at the age of 12, she has since graduated College and is currently serving at a local hospital as a nurse.
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Dawet Daneyl – Runaway, joined Youth Impact from the streets of Addis Ababa, he left his home in Ghana to find work in Addis Ababa.

 

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Mubarek Abedela – Runaway, joined Youth Impact at the age of 16 from the streets of Addis Ababa, he left his home to find better work.

 

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Sebesebea Akalu – Runaway, joined Youth Impact from the streets of Addis Ababa, he left his farm in Ghana to find a better life in Addis Ababa, which resulted in homelessness for over 4 years.

 

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Habetamu Fentetahun – Runaway, joined Youth Impact from the streets of Addis Ababa, he left his farm in Dessie to find a work in Addis Ababa, which resulted in homelessness for 2 years.
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Alem Kere Tiehay – Runaway, joined Youth Impact from a tough life on the streets of Addis Ababa. He has been jailed 8 times for alcohol related crimes. He left his farm in Ghana for Addis Ababa.

 

 

 

It was a true honor to hear the stories behind these young adults, who have so much to offer but, nearly had zero foundation to create a life. Fortunately, Youth Impact has provided a reachable dream and given the ladder of victory. Built upon a dark past, they are the future of Ethiopia.

You can see more of Clay’s work at ClayCookPhotography.com, and follow him on Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook.

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Mornin’ everybody. I get a steady stream of questions about tethering into Lightroom (that’s where you connect your camera directly to your computer and when you shoot, your images appear really large on screen, instead of seeing them on the tiny 3″ monitor on the back of your camera). So this morning, I thought I’d quickly go through seven things you’ll probably want to know. Here goes:

  1. Not every camera can tether to Lightroom
    Here’s a list from Adobe of the cameras it supports for tethering. It’s pretty much Canon and Nikon cameras, with a few Leica camera models (the tethering in Lightroom requires camera manufacturers to provide Adobe with support for tethering to their cameras, so it’s not something Adobe can just decide to do on their own without their support).
  2. You can “super shrink” or hide the Tether bar (the heads up display)
    If you hold the Option key (PC: Alt key) and click on the little “x” in the top right corner of the bar, it will shrink the bar down to just a shutter button (yes, you can fire your camera’s shutter with that button). If you want to hide the bar altogether (but keep the tethering still active), press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T).
  3. That Table that holds my laptop is from Tethertools.com
    I always get asked where I got that table. There’s a company called Tethertools that does nothing but create accessories for people who tether, like the table. They also make an optional little slot under the table for holding an external hard drive; and (my favorite) a nicely designed pop-out drink holder (it’s handier than you’d think).
  4. How to recover from a stall
    At some point, without warning, your tethering will just stop. It’s not your fault, but you will have to know how to recover from a “stall.” First, make sure you camera is awake. If it goes to sleep to protect the battery life of the camera, it puts tethering to sleep, too. If waking it doesn’t work — turn the camera on/off. If that doesn’t work, turn off Lightroom’s tethering (choose Stop Tethered Capture from the File menu), and then turn it back on in the same place. Lastly, unplug and replug the USB cable from your camera and your laptop. One of those will usually do the trick and get you back up and running. BTW: my wife is a pilot and takes great umbrage with my use of the phrase “recovering from a stall” for tethering. Just sayin’.
  5. Canon cameras write a copy to the memory card in the camera. Nikon’s don’t.
    It’s just the way they’re set up by the manufacturer — it’s not Adobe showing a preference. On my 5D Mark III it writes to the compact flash card in the camera and I dig that because it gives me an automatic backup as I shoot, which is nice. NOTE: if you have trouble tethering to Nikon — try popping the card out of the camera.
  6. You might already have the cable you need to tether
    Nearly all cameras ship with the exact cable you need to tether — it’s simply a USB cable with a mini USB on one end (that connects to the mini-USB port on your camera) and a regular USB on the other to plug into your computer. So, go look in the box your camera came in (it’s in your closet) to see if you kept it (you probably did). If you didn’t, you can buy a USB cable online — just ask for one with a mini USB on one end, and a regular USB on the other. The one I use (the long orange cable seen above), is from tethertools. It’s orange so you can see it easier in a dark studio.
  7. Once tethered, you can do live client proofing to an iPad
    You can hand your client an iPad and have them see images from your shoot live on the iPad as you’re shooting (btw: clients super love this!). Not only that — they can see the shoot live on the Web, even if they’re not there (or, if they are there, they can share the shoot with a colleague or friend off site. I have a short video that explains the entire process below.

https://youtu.be/3qofLKdZ0uY

Hope you find that helpful, and hope it inspires you to give tethering a try. Once you do, you can’t imagine not tethering (yes, it’s that good!).

Best,

-Scott

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