Friday
Jun
2013
28

Behind-The-Scenes Video From My Airplane Hangar Car Shoot

by Scott Kelby  |  26 Comments

Here’s the behind-the-scenes video I mentioned on Tuesday from my car shoot at an airplane hangar (as luck would have it, the hanger was the exact same hangar at the airport where my wife flies out of). I used the Priolites again but I also used a new super-lightweight battery pack that let us take one of our Elinchrom studio strobes out on location (I did a quick demo of it on the video above).

Anyway, we were planning on shooting two cars and a plane, and it turned it to a six-car, six-hour long shoot with two Ferraris (an F-430 and a California); a Devon GTX, a Rolls Royce Ghost, a Spyker, and a Audi R8. We were psyched! (Plus, I was finally going to get a full-body shot of the Audi R8 I did the detail shots of last month).

Anyway, I’ll tell the rest in the captions (BTS photos by Brad Moore), but first a big thanks to my buddy David McComas who not only has some amazingly cool cars (and let me shoot them, and borrow his hangar), but he also has friends with more cool cars. Not a bad combination (thanks David!)

Above: This shot is just natural light. We only had a few minutes where the sun had tucked behind the other hangar, but it wasn’t sunset quite yet, so we actually had a decent amount of light, and that’s when I had my crew pull the R8 out in front. I wanted to take a shot that had lots of negative space (the total opposite of the close-up detail shots I took last time).

Above: The Devon GTX. What an insanely cool car (with gull-wing doors, no less). I love how the back has no bumper — it just go straight from the truck to the rear in one solid piece. The color of the car was pretty monochromatic so I went ahead and took it all the way with a black and white conversion. Again, just natural light near sunset.

Above: Here’s a shot with me standing where the Audi R8 was parked, looking back in toward the Devon in the hangar (now you can see the full-color version).

Above: That little red circle in the back of the hangar. That’s me. 70-200mm f/2.8 lens at ISO 100. I switched to the D800 for this one to get extra resolution.

Above: Here’s the over-the-shoulder view.

Above: here’s the Spiker (the one I showed in Tuesday’s behind the scenes shot). Sick car!!! I only had time to shoot two of the car full-body and this was one of them.

Above: Here’s the lighting set-up for the Spyker. Three lights total. #2 and #2 are Priolites (the same ones I did the Audi R8 with last month), so there’s no power pack or cables — the battery it built right into the lights (which is pretty sweet!). The #2 light is a bare blub strobe. It was supposed to have a grid on it, but we somehow misplaced it before the shoot and of course didn’t realize it until we were actually at the shoot. That posed quite a challenge because the light was spilling like crazy, but it was what it was. The #3 light is using a large strip bank.

The #1 light (with a large Tim Wallace-style strip bank) is a regular studio strobe — an Elinchrom BRX 500 (my go-to light int he studio), but we were able to take it on location thanks to the brand new lightweight battery pack I talk about in the video (though here’s a direct link to it at B&H Photo).

Above: I love the front grill of the Spyker! 

Above: I’m not a big fan of laying down on the job, but sometimes ya gotta do what ya gotta do. That’s Brad Moore holding a Priolite with a large strip bank and that’s how we made the detail shot you just saw. Shooting at f/22 makes the light fall off to black on the edges almost instantly (thank you Tim Wallace — it’s his technique). 

Above: Same lighting, same technique, same settings. It still amazes me how the light falls off to solid black like that. I know it makes sense, but it still makes me smile every time I try it. 

Above: Here’s the distinctive rear-end of the Spyker — same everything as far as lighting and camera settings. 

Above: Yes it was that bright where we were shooting, and yes shooting at f/22 makes it fall off to black like that without having to fake it in Photoshop. I was just as surprised as you are, but son-of-a-gun it works!

Above: The rear emblem and very soft lighting. 

Above: I wish I had the time to really experiment and get the lighting just right on this one, but with six cars to shoot in the absolute stiffling heat, we pretty much had to run and gun all day. Even though it was really cool to have all these cars on hand, I wish we had half as many cars and the same amount of time, because if something didn’t work lighting wise, I didn’t have the time to really make it work — I had to cut my losses and move it if it didn’t come together pretty quickly. 

Above: The Rolls was Amazing. First time I had ever sat in one, and the interior was really something to behold. I could have spent two hours just on it, but I only had about 20 minutes (we spent waaaaayyyy to long on lighting the Spyker), and it caught up with us time wise. 

Above: As the heat took its toll on all of us, I started to lame out and shoot some of the shots from a chair, and that’s the on you saw above. We were beat like you cannot believe. Drenched in sweat, semi-dehydrated (we only brought six bottles of water for the three of us — huge mistake) and though we started at 5:00 pm, none of us got home before midnight.

Above: We had two Ferrari’s but all I had time for were detail shots. I just love the Ferrari nameplate so I spent a while on trying to get the lighting right, but I still had to add a radial gradient in Photoshop to get the look I was trying for. 

Above: I’m a sucker for headlamps.

Above: I had to get an engine shot of the California — just one light — still that Priolite but we switched to a small softbox. We probably should have switched back to a stripbank, but I’m still OK with how it came out. 

Above: In Tim’s online classes for Kelby Training, he talked about splitting the logo with the light, so we spent a few extra minutes trying to get it right on the money. 

Above: This is actually the interior of the Ferrari F-430 and I shot it with a 24-70mm f/2.8 using a technique I learned from Tim when we taped his class for Kelby Training on shooting car interiors (should be coming out soon. Brilliant class  — I learned a ton!). 

Above: Here’s a parting shot of the Ferrari California. 

Wrap up
While I’m getting much more comfortable with lighting and shooting the up-close detail shots, I still need a lot more practice with full body shots, and that’s what I’m going to focus on next. While we were out on location I heard about a studio locally with a huge drive-in cove and a giant overhead softbox made for lighting entire cars, and I got a line on a few other cars to shoot. Brad’s on vacation this coming week, so nothing next week, but when he gets back, it’s time to sweat once again!

Above: OK the lighting is kick of whacked in this shot, but I couldn’t leave without showing you at least one shot with the doors open. Is that car sick or what!!!! 

Thanks to Brad and John for assisting me on the shoot (couldn’t’ have done it without you guys), and thanks to David for rounding up lots of cool cars for us to shoot. Also, thanks to my readers for stopping by and here’s wishing you all a sweat-free weekend and lots of shooting opportunities.

 

Thursday
Jun
2013
27

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  67 Comments

Lightroom Conference at Photoshop World
If you’re a photographer, chances are you’re using Lightroom in your workflow (and if you’re not, find out why you should be right here). Did you know that there’s a whole Lightroom Conference that takes place at Photoshop World? It includes three days of classes taught by the top Lightroom instructors in the world including those from Kelby Training (Scott Kelby, Matt Kloskowski, RC Concepcion, and Pete Collins), Adobe (Tom Hogarty, Bryan Hughes, Julieanne Kost, and Terry White), and more! It’s all taking place in Las Vegas from September 4-6 (or come a day early and sign up for the Lightroom 5 Crash Course workshop with Matt Kloskowski).

Find out more over at PhotoshopWorld.com, and leave a comment for your chance to win a full-conference pass!

Copyright Essentials for Today’s Photographers
In the latest addition to the KelbyTraining.com course library, Copyright Essentials for Today’s PhotographersMia McCormick is joined by special guests Jack Reznicki, a commercial photographer, and Ed Greenberg, an intellectual property attorney, to discuss the most pressing, need-to-know copyright information for photographers in front of a live studio audience. Over the course of 2 hours, Ed and Jack answer questions from the audience, do a live walk through of how to register your copyright online, and share a wealth of wisdom, tips, and stories that will inspire you to take the necessary steps to protect your work.

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNally, Ben Willmore, or Matt Kloskowski? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
July 29 – Colorado Springs, CO
Aug 16 – San Antonio, TX
Aug 21 – Indianapolis, IN
Aug 27 – San Jose, CA

Photographic Artistry with Ben Willmore
July 22 – Cleveland, OH

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
July 31 – Virginia Beach, VA
Aug 7 – Charlotte, NC
Aug 9 – Pittsburgh, PA

Lightroom 5 with Matt Kloskowski
Aug 2 – Hartford, CT

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Winners
Beginner Sports Photography Rental
- Meg B.

Kelby Training Live Ticket
- Scott Weintraub

Digital Photography Book Vol. 1, Second Edition
- crisdarocha

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in contact soon! I’m off to Tennessee tomorrow to visit family for a week and enjoy the musical stylings of Milk Carton Kids and Josh Ritter tomorrow night with my brother, so we’ll be skipping Free Stuff Thursday next week (plus it’s Independence Day, so we’re closed anyway). See you right back here in a couple of weeks!

-Brad

Wednesday
Jun
2013
26

It’s Guest Blog Wednesday featuring Tim Tadder!

by Brad Moore  |  18 Comments

Thank you, Scott and Brad for providing this opportunity to share my work and some thoughts. It’s amazing to have a chance to share with this audience. I hope my words are strong, for I chose a camera, not a typewriter as my medium of communication. So please bare with me, poor grammar and all.

Words have never been my friend, they tire me with the duration it takes to visualize a story. Think about how long a writer must spend describing the visual for his audience. There is a reason people read to fall asleep. Images on the other hand are immediate. They can take your breath away in an instant and shatter stereotypes in a heartbeat.

As I sit here staring at a blank white screen hoping something inspiring dribbles out, I am wishing I could just show you my images and they would tell my story. I enjoy the guest blogs where photographers share insight or philosophy into the craft. So, I really would like to share a few things that I hold onto at the core of my process.

The concept that my images are my voice guides me.  Images are the way people know me, therefore they must speak about what I love, how I am, see, and feel. Just as the audible words flow from ones mouth and give insight into the person behind them, so too should my images. Create images that are true to your own voice, who you are, what you stand for and what you love.

I love sports, I am intense, focused, driven, saturated with passion, outspoken and not afraid to share my opinions. If you look at my portfolio, I think you’ll see exactly that. If your images align with your voice, they will be full of soul and very powerful to an audience.

With that said, one of my favorite sayings is, “If my images are my voice, then I never want to be an echo.” I owe most of that to my Father, who always pushed me to be different, think differently and most importantly see uniquely. Today, our industry is overloaded with excellent, technically perfect image makers. One can learn how to do anything photographically online from numerous venues. The competition for work is fierce, so the easiest way to stand out is to do something so different that it demands attention.

Spend time thinking about ways to create images no ones ever seen before. These images stand out, everything else is just an echo.  Echoes are always a more hollow empty sounding version of the original voice. What I see most in image making these days are echoes, sad but true. When I do see someone’s work that is unique, I get so stoked. It’s those people that have careers heading in the right direction.

If your images are unique and true to your voice, then you must truly value them. One of the most frustrating experiences for every photographer is when a client wants to trade images for photo credit. My bills have never been paid with photo credits. Your unique vision has value, otherwise people would not want to pay money for ink and paper to print them. Doing assignments for less than market value creates great industry erosion. If we love what we do, we must protect the industry and each do our part to keep value in our product. Otherwise we will all suffer.

I live in southern California, and some of the best photographers in the world are surf photographers. Unfortunately the surf industry which is built mainly on “image” pays incredibly small amounts for incredible photography. Photographers themselves are to blame for year in and year out, new photographers are willing to trade their images for credit. Once the value is gone it never comes back.

Always make better images. It is impossible to be perfect, and I often call our craft the “illusive search for perfection.” So with each and every assignment, I approach it as a chance to snatch perfection. I never catch it, but I always believe that I will. This keeps me learning, searching, pushing and innovating. When I settle for good enough, it’s time to hang it up.

A fellow photographer once said that his clients did not know the difference between good enough and perfect. I never worry about whether the client knows the difference. I do, and that’s all that matters.You are only as good as your last shoot, and make every assignment an opportunity to make a portfolio piece.

Finally, the only thing about this industry you control is your images. If you spend your time making incredible images, you won’t have to spend very much time doing all the things we hate doing like marketing. Strong images speak for themselves and the internet tends to find them and spread them around to all the right people. You can craft the most killer promo piece in the world and send out a million, but if your images are not unique, strong and filled with your soul, it’s going right in the trash.

To learn more about me please take some time looking at my work. Like Richard Avedon once said  ”My portraits are more about me than my subjects”, hopefully you’ll come away knowing me.

To see more of Tim’s work, visit TimTadder.com, and follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Tuesday
Jun
2013
25

A Behind-The-Scenes Shot From My Latest Car Shoot

by Scott Kelby  |  10 Comments

OK, this is NOT a finished shot — just a behind-the-scenes shot from a 6-hour long, six-car shoot in an airplane hangar. I was going to show the finished shots today and include a behind-the-scenes video about a new piece of gear we took out on location, but the video’s not quite out of editing yet. Hoping for Friday.

In the meantime, you can see two of the three lights used in the shoot —- the one in the top left corner is one of those Priolites that we are totally digging on (here’s a link to my Audi R8 shoot video and Prioite demo video), and the long strip bank near the rear of the car is an Elinchrom BXRI 500 (my go-to studio strobe) running off a very cool, very small, very lightweight, and very affordable battery pack (more on it on Friday’s post).

Above: This is an Instagram shot Brad took of four of the six cars we shot that day. Top left: A Ferrari F-430.Top R:  A Devon GTX. Bottom Left a Spyker, and bottom right an Audi R8. 

Lots more to share of course (plus we got to shoot two other cars: A Rolls Royce Ghost  and a Ferrari California), here on the blog on Friday.

But Before We Get to That…
I just wanted to take a moment to give a heartfelt thanks to all the folks who took the time yesterday to leave me a comment with a kind word or a show of support. I was expecting the worst, and was pleasantly surprised (and relieved) to see so many supportive and understanding comments. Very much appreciated. :)

OK, Now We Can Get to That
Here’s wishing you all a great Tuesday, and here’s hoping all your car shots happen in slightly cooler weather than we were shooting in. Cheers, – Scott 

 

Monday
Jun
2013
24

You Said Something I Disagree With. You Must Be Getting Paid.

by Scott Kelby  |  371 Comments

So I’m reading a review of the new features of Photoshop CC over on Mashable.com, and of course it takes all of three seconds for it to turn nasty, where a commenter accuses the reviewer of getting paid by Adobe to write a favorable review, because after all, if it is a favorable review of something he doesn’t like, the reviewer is obviously “on the take.” He wrote:

“#letsbereal — How many free months of Photoshop CC did Adobe offer for writing this…”

Essentially, he’s saying ‘You said something I disagree with, so you must be getting paid.’ If you say anything positive about the Creative Cloud, like this reviewer did, you get attacked (The funny thing was that the reviewer mentioned how he didn’t like the rental model, yet he was still attacked for liking the new Photoshop features and not siding with the angry mob).

I know this all too well.

When Adobe announced their new subscription plan, the day after I wrote a post here simply addressing some of the misconceptions I had been seeing out there. I did a Q&A where I addressed everything from the misconception that you ran these programs inside a Web Browser to the misconception that you have to be connected to the Internet every day to run Photoshop. I was trying to help, since I knew a lot of the answers. Huge mistake.

There are 662 comments on that post. About 656 of them are direct personal attacks on me, many saying, essentially “I said something you disagree with, so I must be getting paid.” The other six were probably spam. I have literally had people emailing me, and coming up to me in person while I’m out on the road with my tour apologizing for the unwarranted public flogging I took. But that’s where we are today. If any one reviews a product of any kind, and you don’t agree with the reviewer for whatever reason, the reviewer must be getting paid because your opinion on this is so obviously correct to everyone, that only a person getting paid by the company could see it any other way than you see it.

Nobody read where I said, flat-out, at this point I wouldn’t recommend the Creative Cloud to photographers. Nobody seemed to acknowledge that I wrote in-depth about having direct discussions with Adobe about my concerns and the concerns of the 70,000 NAPP members I represent. In fact, I wrote “I’ve given my opinion [to Adobe] to the point that I can’t believe they would actually continue to take my calls.” Yet still, I read again and again how my post was “crafted or written by Adobe’s PR dept.” Geesh.

It’s not just Adobe
This isn’t my first public trashing. I’ve had it nearly as bad once before, when I did a post where I said I was going to buy an iPhone. I didn’t review the iPhone. I didn’t tell other people to buy an iPhone. I just said I thought it looked cool and it had the features I wanted, so I was going to get one. I read comment after comment asking how much Apple had paid me to say I wanted an iPhone, because after all anyone that wants a phone different than that they want is obviously being paid off.

It’s Getting Better Now, But….
Well, last week the Creative Cloud products were released to subscribers, and while I was hesitant to even mention it (which is just sad that it’s come to that), I did post on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ that it had been released and I mentioned that my favorite CC feature was the ability to apply Camera Raw as a filter. It’s one I’ve been waiting years for. I’ve begged everyone at Adobe I know, and it’s finally here, and I love it even more than I thought because it’s faster than I thought it would ever be. But I made the mistake of mentioning it. Cue the haters.

For example, I read this comment:

“I’m going to ignore anybody promoting Photoshop CC, Scott – just cannot afford it, so stop teasing us poor people. Will have to be stuck with CS6 for the rest of my life ;-)”

If you have CS3, CS4, CS5 or CS6, a Photoshop CC subscription is $10 per month for the first year. Two cups of coffee. That’s it. If you can’t swing $10 per month, perhaps Photoshop shouldn’t be your biggest concern, but this is just typical of what I’m reading — not just on my posts, but anywhere somebody posts anything positive about the Creative Cloud.

By the way, the old deal was this: Photoshop is $700. Take it or leave it. Now, anyone can subscribe to Photoshop for $20 a month. I think that’s progress (unless you fear the idea of people who don’t “deserve” to use Photoshop will now actually be able to afford it and become your competitors).

The Entitlement Factor
Another thing I read a lot, still, is from people who skip upgrades complaining that Adobe is being unfair to those “loyal customers.” In fact, in that Mashable article, I read an argument from a guy who skips three releases before he upgrades. I’ve got news for you. You’re not an Adobe customer. Let’s test this theory.

Go to Best Buy, ask for the store manager, and complain about how much the new 4K TVs cost and let him know that he’s being unfair to you, his “loyal Best Buy Customer.” Here’s how that might go:

You: My name is Bob Johnson, and I’m one of your customers.

Best Buy Manager:
OK Bob, let me pull up your records here. Hmmmm. I don’t see any purchases in 2013. Did you buy anything from us this year? No? Let’s check 2012. Hmmm. Nothing there either, Bob. How about we check 2011. Gees I’m checking there and I don’t see any purchases from you in 2011 at all. Let’s go back to 2010. Oh, OK, wait….here it is. You bought something from us back in April of 2010.

Me:
Guess what Bob? You were a Best Buy customer. Yup, back in April of 2010. But Best Buy doesn’t consider you a customer any more. Now, I’m sure the Best Buy manager would like to have you back as a customer again in 2013, but buying something back in 2010 doesn’t keep you as a customer entitled to gripe about…well…anything. Customers are people who buy a company’s products on a regular basis. By the way, if you’re still using Photoshop CS5, it came out in April of 2010. Just so you know.

So when I read people whining about how they’re entitled to upgrades and entitled to this and that, I just shake my head in amazement. Maybe I should go to Exxon and complain how I’m somehow entitled to $2.85 a gallon gas because that was the average price of gas back in April of 2010. By the way, that was probably the last time I bought gas at an Exxon station. I wonder if they still consider me their customer?

I know you’re waiting for an Open Letter to Adobe from me
I still get letters each week from outraged people asking why I haven’t risen up to be the “voice of the people” like I did back in November 2011 when I wrote an “Open Letter to Adobe” here on the blog about a policy Adobe had announced (but totally flew under the radar) which had to do with the cut-off date for when users of CS3 and CS4 would be eligible to upgrade to the Creative Cloud. I didn’t know about it until I read it on an Adobe blog, and I called Adobe out on it, asking them to consider giving those users more time, and thankfully Adobe reconsidered their policy and moved the date until the end of the following year. Very fair I thought, but it was your comments that changed Adobe’s mind, not my letter.

So, where’s my letter this time? When I wrote that letter, it was asking for something very simple — move the cutoff date. This is a totally different situation. This is a multi-billion dollar software company, the 6th largest software company in the world,  re-inventing the way they do business forever. The software industry is changing faster than ever, and the development, engineering, costs, delivery and methodology of how software is created today is in a state of rapid evolution.

This new plan isn’t something Adobe decided on a whim — this is the biggest change in the history of Adobe, and one that I’m sure has been considered from every possible angle. I’m certain an open letter from me would be accepted as warmly as I would greet Adobe telling me how much I need to charge for my products. There is a line, and me telling Adobe what to charge for their products, is clearly over it. The public is responsible for telling any company what “the right price” is for their products, and the market always determines what that price will be, which is why you see sales, rebates, deals, and price changes on everything from cars to cameras.

You can’t name a concern you have that I didn’t voice to Adobe before their official announcement. I didn’t just write a letter. I sat in front of them, face-to-face, carrying your message forward but there are some things that I just flat-out have no control over, and no right to interfere with, but yet…they are listening.

Look, Adobe is listening
How could they not be? They read every article. They read every forum comment. I’ve forwarded every single email I’ve been sent directly to the executives at Adobe because I want them to hear from the people I represent.

Yet, haters are still waiting for someone, anyone, to mention the Creative Cloud so they can say the same things over and over again that they’ve been saying since the subscription-only plan was announced. Believe me, Adobe’s heard it. They’ve read it. Adobe realizes all the concerns around pricing for photographers and about the whole file access/editing thing if you ever leave Creative Cloud. This subscription-only plan is still new, and like any plan, it can be tweaked, improved, and modified (but it’s not going to be reversed), so hopefully now we can take a deep breath and start looking using the new features we’ve been waiting for.

By the way, posting the same exact thing on every forum you can find and publicly knocking anyone that disagrees with you doesn’t help your cause. It actually makes you seem like a troll or spammer. When you see 300 negative comments but then realize 150 of those are by the same few people making the same point again and again, makes Adobe or anyone else realize “this isn’t as bad as it looks.”

When I did write an Open Letter back in November of 2011, Adobe did respond but it was two months later. Big multi-billion dollar companies are like aircraft carriers — they’re not speed boats — it takes them a while to turn. Give them a chance to digest all the feedback; consider their options, and give them the benefit of the doubt.

Haters — prepare for a shock
One thing that drives me kind of crazy about the haters is that they feel that everyone out there feels exactly the same way they do. They feel like everyone hates this new plan, it’s universally bad for everyone, and Adobe will soon be in huge trouble financially for it. They completely ignore the fact that there were 500,000 Creative Cloud subscribers already in the program before Adobe announced the Subscription-only deal. These are people who felt it was a better deal for them, and for their business, to sign up for the subscription plan than it was to continue the old plan. Well haters, your day is about to get worse, because this news kind of flew under the radar but Adobe just announced that in just a few weeks, more than 221,000 more people jumped on the Creative Cloud subscription plan (That’s 221,000+ in one quarter alone and that was BEFORE the new CC Apps were available for download).

They now have over 721,000 subscribers, and it’s growing at an incredible pace. The fact is, there are a great many people who feel the Creative Cloud subscription plan is perfect for them, for their needs, and there are a ton of new Adobe customers who could never even dream of using Photoshop that are now becoming Photoshop users. That is cool!

I still feel the same
I still feel that the deal isn’t there for photographers yet. But I talk to Adobe all the time, and I know they are considering lots of options and possibilities and I know one day, hopefully sooner than later, I’ll be able to say “Hey, photographers, now it makes sense.” It’s just not yet. No one will ever acknowledge that I wrote that.

But the tide is starting to turn 
A few weeks ago, it was all negative. I just went through the Mashable list of comments (there were plenty), and son-of-a gun the tide is changing. 721,000+ people are already on the Creative Cloud. By the end of the year, it’ll probably be over a million. There are people out there totally digging it, and they’re starting to stand up for it, and let people know what it’s really about and that it can be really great. They’re going to the forums and writing positive things, despite the trolls and haters, even though they will be accused of “Getting paid by Adobe.” Just like I was.

So what am I going to do?
I’m going to move forward with what I’m supposed to be doing — teaching people how to use Photoshop and Lightroom, and by gosh that’s exactly what I’m going to do. I’m tried of arguing about it — I want to get back to using it. I’m going to go back to reporting what’s going on with Photoshop CC; I’m going to talk about the new features, and I’m going help people along their path and I’m going to continue to voice your legitimate concerns to Adobe.

I’m going to ignore the haters, the trolls, and just move on about my business of teaching, evangelizing, and enjoying the coolest software product ever. If you’re coming with me for the ride, I welcome you along with open arms. If this is the end of our journey together, no worries — I understand, and maybe we’ll meet again one day. :-)

Cheers everybody and thanks for letting me get all this off my chest. Now, I just can’t wait for Apple to release that iPhone 5s. ;-)

All my best,

-Scott Kelby

Thursday
Jun
2013
20

It’s Free Stuff Thursday!

by Brad Moore  |  76 Comments

Beginner Sports Photography with Scott Kelby
If you’re interested in learning how to shoot sports like a pro then Beginner Sports Photography with Scott Kelby is the class for you! Join Scott as he teaches you everything you need to know to take your sports photography to the next level. The same basic principles apply whether you are shooting your kids on the weekends or covering a professional sporting event. You’ll learn about the gear you need to bring the viewer into the heart of the action, the camera settings that allow you to stop motion and achieve tack sharp focus, compositional techniques you can use to tell the story of what is happening in the game, how to get started on the road to gaining greater access to shooting professional level events, and so much more!

Leave a comment for your chance to win a free rental of this class!

Kelby Training Live
Want to spend a day with Scott Kelby, Joe McNallyRC Concepcion, Ben Willmore, or Matt Kloskowski? Check out these seminar tours!

Shoot Like A Pro with Scott Kelby
July 29 – Colorado Springs, CO
Aug 16 – San Antonio, TX
Aug 21 – Indianapolis, IN
Aug 27 – San Jose, CA

Photoshop CS6 for Photographers with RC Concepcion
June 21 – Calgary, AB
June 26 – New Orleans, LA

Photographic Artistry with Ben Willmore
July 22 – Cleveland, OH

One Light, Two Light with Joe McNally
July 31 – Virginia Beach, VA
Aug 7 – Charlotte, NC
Aug 9 – Pittsburgh, PA

Lightroom 5 with Matt Kloskowski
Aug 2 – Hartford, CT

Leave a comment for your chance to win a ticket to one of these events!

Ron Martinsen’s Review of The Digital Photography Book Part 1, Second Edition
Photo blogger Ron Martinsen recently wrote a review of Scott’s update of his best-selling The Digital Photography Book, Part 1. You may remember Ron from last week’s 100th episode of The Grid, where he joined Scott and myself (Brad) to tackle viewer requested topics like Lightroom 5, copyright law, photography role-models and more. In the review, he talks about Scott’s approach to sharing photography tips, shares what’s new in the book, and gives a chapter-by-chapter synopsis, along with his thoughts on the book.

Head on over to RonMartBlog.com to see the review and even get some great discounts on stuff like Kelby Training, NAPP, and Photoshop plug-ins! And leave a comment for your chance to win a free copy of The Digital Photography Book, Part 1, Second Edition!

Photography & Photoshop Training from Serge Ramelli
Our good friend and Paris-based photographer Serge Ramelli has just released a new class that covers his entire workflow from shooting to post processing. Join him as he goes on location in Paris and Israel to capture beautiful images, then takes them into Lightroom and Photoshop to finish them. He even gives you the RAW files so you can follow along as you’re watching the 3+ hours of training!

You can check it out right here, and use the discount code kelbyblog to get an extra 15% off this and any of his other classes!

Winners
Dave Black Class Rental
- Ray Fitzgerald

Kelby Training Live Ticket
- Phil Berg

Signed Photography Q&A Book from Zack Arias
- Gerg1967

If you’re one of the lucky winners, we’ll be in touch soon. Have a great Thursday!

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