Designing with Type with Scott Kelby
Make your type look awesome! Join Scott Kelby for a class on designing with type. This class was created for non-designers who need to use type with their photos, such as when creating slideshows, photo books, watermarks, etc., and want that layout to have more impact. Starting with a look at some of the cool type features in Photoshop, Scott moves on to explaining what types of things you should not ever do, and then steps through a series of in-depth type layout recipes that you can use with confidence in your projects. At the end, Scott wraps up the class with a look at some of his favorite and most useful fonts and how to get them.

In Case You Missed It
In High School Football Photography, Dave Black and Scott Kelby cover everything from choosing your ISO, shutter speed, and white balance to the right gear for the job and the best approach for the different styles of shooting you might be interested in pursuing. Whether you are out there for the school’s sports information department, a magazine, a wire service, or a trading card company, you’ll learn all the tips and techniques the pros use to capture jaw dropping action shots as well as the peak moments that go on to define a sporting event for generations to come.

Glyn Dewis-1000

“I invented nothing new. I simply assembled the discoveries of other men behind whom were centuries of work. Had I worked fifty or ten or even five years before, I would have failed. So it is with every new thing.” – Sir Henry Ford

From what felt like day one being involved in this industry I remember reading in books, magazines and hearing people saying…

1) You MUST specialise.


2) You MUST have a unique and recognisable style.

… but, like most I guess, when I first started out I didn’t have a clue what it was I wanted to specialize in, and I certainly didn’t have a recognisable style; geez when I look back at my earlier work, there’s definitely no consistency as every photo shoot looks like it could have been from a completely different photographer.

Now both made complete sense but how on earth do you get to this point of knowing what you want to specialise in and also having your own unique and recognisable style?

Well with the specialising, if I’m honest I just went out and tried everything. If you’ve ever heard the phrase ‘spinning too many plates’ well, this was me. I tried Weddings, Family Portraits, Baby Photos, Food Photography, Architectural and so it goes on but by doing so I very quickly realised what I didn’t like to do which by default left me with what I did like to do … Portraits; the Style thing though was a completely different ball game.

One thing I did when I first started out was to set up a blog; not with the intention of gaining masses of followers or anything like that but rather as something to motivate me and get me out to produce content. You see by committing myself to writing one post a week I was ‘hung by the tongue’ to get out with my camera to create a new picture each and every week that I could then write about. As the blog grew and gained more followers than just my wife, I introduced a Monthly Interview section where each month I would interview another Photographer who’s work I liked and/or was well known in the Industry and ask them a set list of questions; one of which was about style and in particular, how to develop your own.

99% of the responses I got back basically said that you can’t force your own style; it just happens after a period of time and lots and lots of time behind the camera and in front of the computer screen. One Photographer in particular said that he believed your own style is heavily influenced by your life experiences from a child to adulthood, your likes and dislikes and this definitely rang true with me as in my own portfolio you’ll never see pictures of white backgrounds, balloons and people jumping in the air clapping their hands. Not to say there’s anything wrong with that but it’s just not for me and that’s not a conscious decision I made but just a style I was never drawn to.

So if style comes from your life experiences, likes, and dislikes where do you start? Surely you have to have a starting point that you can move on from and this would likely mean copying?

It’s at this moment when you mention copying that there’s a sharp intake of breath across the Photography World…”Copy? You can’t copy! You MUST have your own unique and identifiable style.” Well that’s all well and good and I get the whole unique thing but what I’m talking about here is using copying as a way to develop yourself, not plagiarism.

The best way I can explain this is by going off topic for a moment so let’s choose the Music Industry as a perfect example…

Copying is widely accepted within the music industry. Every day you can listen to the radio and almost every other track you listen to will be either a cover version or have parts of one song mixed in to create a completely different track, and this is just the norm. You mention copying in Photography though and lightning bolts will fall from the sky.

Design by Ivor Arbiter

Back when they started out, The Beatles would tour all the Working Men’s Clubs, play at the Cavern in Liverpool and such places. But the music they played would be cover versions of artists such as Elvis, Buddy Holly and Jerry Lee Lewis. In fact it was Paul McCartney who said they only started writing their own music so they could perform their own unique sounding gigs, and you see that’s the point here…they would copy other artists’ work until eventually their own style developed and became a sound instantly recognisable as them.

One of my favourite tracks of all time is “Every Breath You Take” by The Police with its famous guitar riff; you hear just a few seconds of it and instantly you know the track.

Now, American Rapper, Puff Daddy in one of his own tracks, used the same guitar riff in his song ‘I’ll Be Missing You’ released following the death of his friend and fellow rapper The Notorious B.I.G. So, same guitar riff, completely different song, and this goes on all the time and again is widely accepted. Now granted this may not be the very best example as this lead to a law suit due to no permission being granted to use the guitar riff, but you get my point right?!?

Moving away from the Music Industry but still on the subject of copying, let’s take a quick look at the Movie Industry and in particular, Movie Posters and art work.


Here’s an example where copying has been used to create a multitude of different movie posters. I was first aware of this pose with the Man and Woman leaning against each other, when the film Pretty Woman was released, but just take a look at all the similar examples here. Now I don’t know which one was used first, nor do I suggest the pose is copyrighted in any particular way, but here is a prime example of how something from one piece of work can be used in another to create something new.

To reinforce the point check out these many examples here where we see a similar concept of ‘Person Running’ being used.


Occasionally I run training days where I’ll teach attendees an area of Photography and Retouching. The interesting thing here is, let’s say each of the attendees has with them their own computer to work on and I give each of them the same RAW file to work with. I then start working through the retouching step by step for them to follow and from time to time I’ll stop what I’m doing and wander around the attendees to see how they are getting on. Now you know what…without fail, even though I’ve shown them the exact steps to do, every one of the attendees will produce something that looks a little different. And this isn’t because they’ve done something wrong, but because they may have altered some of the settings I suggested to suit their own taste…does that make sense?

“We want you to take from us. We want you, at first to steal from us, because you can’t steal. You will take what we give you and you will put it in your own voice and that’s how you will find your voice. And that’s how you begin. And then one day someone will steal from you.”– Francis Ford Coppola (Screenwriter, Film Director & Producer)

A great place for getting ideas and inspiration to ‘copy’ from is the Internet; I’m forever trawling around and coming across pictures that I like the look of and look to see how I can use an element of it such as the lighting style in my own work.

One such example is this picture that I saw by American Photographer, Joey Lawrence (Joey L) that he made for a National Geographic Channel program called ‘Killing Lincoln.’

Photo by Joey L

I was initially drawn to the pose, which for two people was certainly different with them being back to back in such a way, but also the lighting which I thought worked wonderfully. Straight away I thought the pose and lighting style would work great in a picture I was due to be taking of World Campion Kick Boxer Steven ‘Pocket Rocket’ Cook and his Coach, Michael Graham.

scook_bts scook

One of my all time favourite photographers is Annie Leibovitz. I just love everything about her pictures, in particular the portraits and group photographs of celebrities for publications such as Vanity Fair. The lighting is just so incredibly natural as are the poses and expressions she draws out of her subjects.

Scouring the internet one day I came across this picture of Actors, Sir Ian McEllen and Patrick Stewart photographed by Annie, and as is my usual practice I took a screen grab and stored it in my ‘Inspiration and Ideas’ folder on my computer.

Photo by Annie Leibovitz

This is something I do all the time and did from day 1, only then it meant tearing pages out of magazines and sticking them in a scrap book; now things are so much easier with screen grabs and taking pictures with your mobile phone.

It just so happened that a while later I was photographing a couple of guys from a group called The Bearded Villains; very stylish with flat caps, waist coats and fob watches, and the picture I’d saved earlier came to mind. Similar lighting, pose and the textured background would work a treat on these guys so that’s exactly what we did; again…taking something from one and using it in another to create something new and different.

beards_bts beards

So when I say copying I say that in the loosest term. We’re not talking plagiarism here trying to recreate an exact copy of another piece of work but instead being inspired; yes inspired is probably a better word for it.

“Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing.”– Salvadore Dali

Anyone who knows me knows that I’m an animal lover and that going on a safari is high on my bucket list. I’ll do it one day for sure, but in the mean time one on-going project I have running and am constantly adding to is my Animals Project.

This is a Photography and Retouching project where I go to places like Wildlife Parks and Zoos to photograph animals in captivity. I’m there for as little time as possible because I find them quite depressing, but what I then do with these photographs is use Photoshop to cut them out of their captive scene and place them into a new scene that I’ve created and has the look and feel of their natural habitat. For me, doing this feels like setting them free and was actually the first time I think I ever felt emotionally moved by photography.


Don’t get me wrong, I’m not about to turn all heavy and deep on you but it just was. It was incredible to me how impactive it was to separate an animal from its environment and see how it changed the mood and overall feel.

Shortly after starting on this project I became aware of Photographer, Nick Brandt and his wildlife photographs from Africa. NEVER had photography stopped me in my tracks before such as his work; incredibly powerful, emotive, beautiful imagery.

Lioness with Cub Feeding, 2007
Photos by Nick Brandt

So could I ‘take’ something from Nick Brandt’s work that would add to and enhance my own?

Maybe it would be just to go with Black & White as opposed to colour?

Now, I’m no Nick Brandt, but by trying to copy the look of one of his pictures and see how it would turn out, helped me to produce my own piece because no matter how hard we try to copy, we never will! The result? … pieces of work that I’m actually really quite proud to have hanging on the office wall.

animals_1 animals_2

So copying IS a good thing. It gives you a starting point, a beginning that you can move on from and with time, after copying over and over again your own style will show itself.

“You can’t shortcut the shortcut because Copying IS the shortcut.” – Glyn Dewis

As an artist you’ll force yourself to overcome challenges, develop your skills and so develop your portfolio. As someone in business, by going through the process of planning and preparing your own work, it will help you to hone those skills when working with clients.

In the end my ultimate goal was to have a style and to be hired for the kind of work I wanted to do as opposed to take on whatever came my way. But, in the process of developing that style and those skills as I copied, if someone ever posted online ‘that looks like a Joel Grimes picture or an Annie Leibovitz picture’ do you think I was concerned? Heck no! That’s a compliment and shows you’re on your way to developing your own style.

Copy lighting styles, copy poses, copy book covers, movie posters; just get out there and copy, become inspired and watch your own unique and recognizable style and portfolio grow.

Photography is a whole lot of fun and for those of us who never excelled or were encouraged in art at school, now armed with a camera, some great software and lots of practice, the sky really is the limit.

“Don’t wait until you know who you are to get started.”Austin Kleon

So from this day on you have my blessing to get out there and become a Thief.

My upcoming book, to be published early 2017. Pre-order here!

You can see more of Glyn’s work at, check out his tutorials on YouTube and classes on KelbyOne, and follow him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


If this ever happens to you — you go to open a JPEG image in Photoshop, and you get a warning dialog box saying you have an ‘Invalid JPEG Marker’ and it won’t open the image, here’s what I do (I made a video with what to do step-by-step – it’s easy).

I’m in Iceland right now….
…and I’m sharing my behind-the-scenes crazy stuff over on Instagram, if you follow me over there.

Tomorrow: It’s Canon 5D Mark IV day on “The Grid”
The wonderful Larry Becker is sitting in for me tomorrow on “The Grid” doing the hosting duties with our guests, Canon Explorers of Light, Rick Sammon, and video guru, Bruce Dorn, who both got a chance to shoot projects with the just-announced 5D Mark IV, and they’ll be sharing their experiences and answering questions. That’s tomorrow at 4pm ET on “The Grid.”

“Gear Head LIVE” is back tomorrow…
That’s right — they’re back — Rudy Winston (Canon’s super genius tech guru, and hero to KelbyOne members around the world), will be here tomorrow with  Brent Ramsey (Canon’s video Tech Genius guy and the other part of the Gear Head Tag Team) answering KelbyOne members questions live, and the Webcast is hosted by the always-fun Larry Becker.

KelbyOne members can watch this free Webcast at

If you’re not a member, you can still watch by signing up for the 10-day free trial. Then you’re a member (well, for 10-days anyway).

OK, that’s it from here in Iceland
Don’t miss tomorrow’s Guest Blog, right here. Same bat time. Same bat channel.



NFL 2014 -- Buccaneers vs. Packers

Hi Gang: I get asked this question enough that I thought I’d do a quick blog post on it. Here goes:

Shooting Mode: Aperture Priority

F-stop: f/2.8
Note: I shoot wide open (using the lowest numbered f/stop) on whichever lens I’m using at the time, and I don’t change my f/stop the entire day.

Shutter Speed: 1/1000 of a second or faster
Note: For late afternoon or night games, I turn on Auto ISO and I set my MINIMUM shutter speed to 1/1000 of a second, so no matter what, I’ll also have at least 1/1000 of a second to freeze the action.

ISO: Bright Sunny Day Games: 100 ISO. Cloudy Days: 200 ISO. Night games: Auto ISO (see Shutter Speed above).

White Balance: Auto for day and night games, but I adjust it if it looks funky at night or if I’m shooting in a dome. A lot depends on the lighting in the stadium.

Focus Mode: AI Servo (Continuous Focus Mode on Canon bodies)

Auto Focus (AF) Area Selection Mode: AF point expansion (up, down, left, and right)

Focus Control: Back Button Focus

Shooting Mode: High-Speed Continuous (burst mode)

File Mode: JPEG high (here’s why)

Auto Focus Configuration Tool Preset: Case 4 (on Canon cameras), but sometimes I switch back to Case 1 if I feel like I’m having a bad focus day and I want to blame it on the equipment instead of the real problem.

Highlight Warning: On


Main camera: Day game: 200-400mm f/4
Main camera: Night game: 400mm f/2.8 (to keep ISO lower)
2nd Body: 70-200mm f/2.8 and/or 24-70mm f/2.8

IS (Image Stabilization): Off
Note: If you’re shooting at fast shutter speeds, this should be turned off.

Main body: Canon EOS 1Dx
2nd Body: Canon EOS 1Dx
Note: I don’t have the Canon 1Dx Mark II yet. Canon gave me a loaner for a weekend to review, but I haven’t bought one yet. I don’t have a 7D Mark II either – again, another weekend loaner.

Memory Cards: Lexar Professional 1066x Compact Flash Cards
I generally use a 64GB or 128GB, but both are overkill because I shoot in JPEG, so I only use about 12GB on my main camera, and 6 or 7GB on my 2nd body.


I hope you found that helpful. :)

If you’re into sports photography (or even just getting into it)…
…we have a bunch of full-length online classes at KelbyOne, but I’d maybe start with these:

  1. I teach a class on “Beginner Sports Photography” (link) Catch it if you’re brand new to sports.
  2. I co-host a class featuring sports photography legend, Peter Read Miller, called “What Makes a Great Sports Photo” (it’s a really eye-opening class – he’s amazing!). Heres the link.
  3. Another great class is from renowned sports photographer, Dave Black, and it’s on “Shooting High School Football.” Such a great class! (link)

OK, I’m off to Iceland today with my buddy Terry White – my first time ever and I’m really excited. :)

Have a great Monday, and we’ll see you back here tomorrow when I’ve got a cool tip for what to do when you have a damaged JPEG image.



P.S. A big thanks to everybody who came out to my seminar in Indianapolis last Thursday. Such a great group of photographers (and thanks for the awesome turnout). Next step: Minneapolis on September 21, 2016. Tickets here. 


NFL 2014 -- Buccaneers vs. Packers

The drought is over — Football is back, and tonight’s my first game of the season (well, it’s a pre-season game, but ya know — I definitely need a pre-season game to warm up and shake the dust off a long off-season).

I’m excited to once again be covering Tampa Bay Buccaneers home games for Zuma Sports, and that starts with tonight’s epic clash against the Cleveland Browns (stop snickering). I think it’s going to be a solid year for Tampa, so I’m psyched to see how the season plays out.

NFL loadout

Here’s the load out I’m using for tonight’s game (No, I don’t have any 1DX Mark IIs – I’m still using the old 1Dxs). Buried in there is a Rapid Strap camera strap. I can probably take the Hoodman Loupe out, since it’s a night game, right? ;-)

OK, gotta run. Hope you guys have a great weekend — I’m heading to Iceland on Monday, so could be a sketchy blogging schedule next week. We’ll see.  :)




Canon just announced perhaps one of the most anxiously awaited new cameras in years — the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV. I got a chance to do a shoot with it (see the video below), and I have to say, it’s not only probably the best camera Canon’s ever made, it’s arguably one of the best cameras ever made, period. I just fell in love with it!

First, check out the video where I go over all the main specs (and I share a few shots from my first shoot with it).

That video covered all the really big features, but…
there’s all sorts of other cool stuff in this camera, so head over to Canon’s site to read the press release about all the other stuff, like built-in light flicker correction and a new noise algorithm, and enhanced scene recognition and face detection capabilities, and all that type of stuff.

In the meantime, here’s some more picture of the body, which look astonishingly like the old 5D Mark III body!

Mark4 Backb

Above: The back view which look very familiar. 

mark 5 side 1b

Above: Side view with lens attached (seriously, where you would be without these helpful captions)?

Mark 5 topb

Above: What could this be? Wait! Wait! I know! Is it — the top of the camera? Yes, you are correct (said the council on the glaringingly obvious. So why did I make these captions at all? Because it looks better!). 

Canon also announced a couple of new lens (one that I am particularly interested in is the newly updated 16-35mm and they also announced a 24-105mm. Both expected in October I believe).

OK, that’s the big news today. I’m in Indianapolis with my seminar today. I expect to meet a bunch of very excited Canon shooters there today!