Monthly Archives September 2020

I’m very excited to be the guest tomorrow on Terry White’s “Photography Master Class” live stream, and I’m doing a presentation called “Photo Recipes” where I share a final image, and then show how to make a similar shot, with behind-the-scenes photos and camera setting and such.

It’s free and open to everybody – we’re live from 10:55 AM to 11:55 AM ET, and you can watch it right here on the blog below (and if you miss the live stream, and can watch the archive here as well). :)

Hope you can make it (or rewatch it above if you missed the live stream).

We already have over 1,000 attendees for next week’s Landscape Photography Conference

It’s not too late to join us — it starts with a pre-conference session I’m teaching on “What makes a great landscape photo” and we also have a first-timer orientation class from Larry Becker to help you make the most of the virtual conference. Here’s the link to get your ticket — don’t miss out.

Have a great weekend everybody, and thanks to Terry for having me on his awesome show (which airs each week at this same time. Always great info).

Stay safe and sane, and we’ll catch you back here next week (well, at least that’s what I’m hoping). :)

-Scott

The Grid: Photography Website Critiques

Looking for ways to improve your photography website portfolio? Join Scott Kelby and Erik Kuna above on The Grid to see their critiques of photographers who asked for feedback on their sites!

New KelbyOne Class: The Complete Guide to Lightroom Classic & CC with Serge Ramelli

Get ready to master the entire Lightroom ecosystem! Join Serge Ramelli as he takes you through all of the features of Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic.

Serge begins the class with a look at the cloud based version of Lightroom, often referred to as Lightroom CC, and then transitions to a thorough exploration of Lightroom Classic. After getting oriented to the interface and tools, Serge dives deep with a series of start to finish projects using both versions of Lightroom.

Over the course of 80 individual lessons, Serge will teach you his entire workflow and explore all of the features you need to know to become a Lightroom master!

Newborn Baby Photography

I am so happy, thrilled actually, to be on the blog this week! Thank you for having me.

I am Tracy Sweeney, child/family photographer and owner of Elan Studio in Bristol, Rhode Island. I want to share with you my approach to newborn photography, specifically how I style newborns using various textures to craft natural, sweet, and emotional images. I will teach you how to create multiple images within the same set to maintain efficiency while crafting creative images guaranteed to impress your clients and fans.

I do this specifically through my ONE SET, MANY IMAGES approach. This begins with preparing one full set.


FULL BODY/FULL SET

Position baby comfortably in full set. Layer natural textures, soft fabrics to create interest and contrast. Wrap or swaddle baby to keep limbs close to body. Use extra swaddling blankets underneath layers to help position baby, lift head, support arms/legs etc. so that baby is comfortable and his/her body rests peacefully.


SLIGHT PROFILE

Using the same set/position, photograph baby from a side angle, focusing on a slight downward profile image. Keep eye closest to you in focus and shoot with a large aperture to soften features.


HANDS

Use a Macro lens to focus on baby’s bitty features.


LIPS/NOSE

Continue to focus on additional features within the pose. Consider alternative angles and closeups.

(more…)

I write this from the departure lounge of London Gatwick Airport – quite apt for #TravelTuesday with me, Dave Williams, on ScottKelby.com today and every Tuesday. I am a little apprehensive, though, because there’s a chance I may not be allowed entry to the country I’m flying to today. Keep an eye on my Instagram story or Facebook page to see where it is and whether I made it in!

(Clue: – the Aurora can shine bright!)

Today I want to talk to you all about luck. Luck is something a lot of us need during times like these. To keep our photography business or hobby going with strength during a global pandemic is just one of many problems we’re faced with right now. For me, it’s the cancellation after cancellation of trips, trade shows, and missions, causing a distinct lack of opportunity and content to shoot and write about. The thing is, it’s all too easy to take a back seat and go with the flow when we get beaten down as we’ve been. Perhaps models and clients are less available to you, or maybe locations to shoot are closed or limited. Whatever the problem is, it’s down to us to get lucky and find a solution.

The thing about luck is that it goes hand in hand with opportunity. When we’re presented an opportunity, we’re said to be lucky, and we should take it. So, is luck the opportunity? Do we wait to have an opportunity and, in turn, wait to be lucky?

No. The answer is no.

Luck can be described perfectly: Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. We are in control of our own luck. To a great extent, we control our destiny, our fate. If now is a time when you feel like you need a little luck, be prepared to take whatever opportunity you find or whatever opportunity you can create.

Two weeks ago, I lost the opportunity to go to Greece (and the money invested in that trip). Similarly, last week I lost the opportunity to go to Hungary. Iceland has also been lost, and Canada. For a travel photographer and writer, this is a huge blow, but it’s down to me and me alone to prepare, to create another opportunity, and to make myself lucky. It’s down to the luck that I created that I’m sitting and writing this post today from the wiped-clean, dishevelled, disgusting green seat of Gatwick airport’s departure lounge, waiting anxiously for my gate number to appear on the screen amongst only a handful of flights.

For me, I need to travel. It’s a necessity of the job that I d, although there are “workarounds” I can take to travel closer to home. More than that, it’s in my spirit. I am simply not me without travel. I need to be me, and this is how I need to do it. I’ve created my own luck exactly as I described – I prepared and made an opportunity. I’m being entirely complicit with all immigration requirements, hence the number of cancellations I’ve faced. But against the odds and in spite of the circumstances – I’m lucky.

Whatever it is you do, and whether it’s related to photography or just to your everyday life, remember that you are in control of your luck.

Put in the hard work, take some leaps of faith, be positive, and improve your odds. I promise, it will all work out in the end.

If you need help or advice from myself, any of the other KelbyOne instructors, or like-minded friends, there’s plenty of us out there willing to push you in the right direction. A great community accessible to all is the Friends Of The Grid Facebook Group, or the KelbyOne Member Community to start with.

Now go get lucky!

Much love

Dave

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