Posts By Brad Moore

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Greetings! My name is Chris Orwig , and I’m a photographer, interactive designer and educator. I whole heartedly agree with the acclaimed French photographer Marc Riboud who says, “Photography is about savoring life at 1/100th of a second.” And it is true, isn’t it? Photography enriches, enlivens and expands how we think, what we see and who we are. Photography helps us live more fully, more completely. Having a camera in hand does make a difference. Yet, throughout one’s photographic journey, there are seasons when our passion and vitality dwindles. That’s why we read blogs like this. We’re looking for a bit of straightforward information and inspiration that will further us along. In light of that, here’s a post devoted to providing you with some creative thoughts and anecdotes that will hopefully lead you to creating more compelling photographs – enjoy!

Burn out or Burn Bright
As a photography faculty at the Brooks Institute, I’ve worked with a wide range of students. Some have gone on to accomplish great things – even fame! Others have dried up, burned out and left the field all together. I’ve always been interested in this dichotomy, and it interests our students as well. They are always on the lookout for the secret that will help them excel. A few years back, one student was having his portfolio reviewed by the legendary Jay Maisel.

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The review was fine, yet after it was over the student pleaded with Jay, “Tell me, how can I take more interesting photos?” With missing a beat, Jay volleyed back, “Become a more interesting person.” Or said in another way, as Chris Rainier told me last week, “…at some point photography becomes autobiographical. In order to create better photos, sometimes we need to put down the photography books and magazines. Then we need to go out and to develop who we are.”

Who we are, shapes what we see.

Make the Ordinary Extraordinary
Regardless of who you are or what your do, it is easy for anyone to fall prey to “if only” thinking. If only I had that lens. If only I had that camera. If only I was given that assignment. If only I lived in that town. If only. Yet, to counter such stifling thoughts, many photographers I know use their imagination to redefine circumstances. And right now, I’m not talking about photographically finding beauty in unlikely circumstances. While that is critical, here I’m talking about defining who you are and what you do. Let me explain. (more…)

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Extreme Photography: First Frame

When high school guys have a little too much courage (or booze) in their system, they sometimes hit the road for a game of “chicken.” In the game (primarily designed to thin the herd of the stupid young males before they get to breed) two people drive right at each other in cars, until one blinks and swerves out of the way first.

This person is the loser of the game.

Get a little more age and enough alcohol involved — and a handgun — and you may end up with a game of Russian Roulette, which is an even faster ticket to a finalist slot in the Darwin Awards.

As a young sports photographer 20 some-odd years ago, our professional equivalent was a little game we liked to call “First Frame.” I was introduced to it by my friend Rich Riggins, who was a ridiculously good sports shooter at a very young age.

The rules were simple: Two competing photographers shooting the same game shot the first frame of a 36-exposure roll of Tri-X at each other, thus verifying that no rolls of film were switched later. The very next frame was your entry in the game. Whoever had the best action shot (moment, composition, focus, etc.) won.

Mind you, this was in the days of film and manual focus cameras. We didn’t have 11FPS auto-focus digital Uzis with 4000-shot clips. And yes, we walked to school, five miles, uphill both ways — in the snow. Barefoot.

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There may be a global pandemic, but my creative cup runneth over and thanks to a little ingenuity and technology I was able to create new work everyday. How? Well, take a look at the photo below.

This photo was shot on an old CRTV, which was hooked up to an Apple TV, which was AirPlaying a Zoom call via my iPad Pro.

Not only was this project been a fun, technical challenge, but it also allowed me to experiment further with today’s technology, and i’m honored to share my knowledge with you.

Now many of you might be thinking “What’s so special about photographing someone on an old CRTV?” Well, nothing! However, I took this idea and and ran with it, with a little help from my friends.

Without further adieu I present an unedited video of a fully remote photo shoot.

Think you need to be within 50 miles of each other? Not true! Kelby One instructor and good friend, Frank Doorhof and I did an identical shoot from over 6000 miles away! Here is Frank’s recap on his blog.

You can see more of Andrew’s work at AndrewFoordPhotography.com, and keep up with him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Godriguez pondering what he will shoot and also what to have for lunch

I’ve fallen, and I can’t get up!

I’m stuck…what the hell am I going to shoot?…I need some way to be inspired but I don’t know how. Do you ever ask yourself these questions? Do you find yourself needing ways to figure out what to shoot? Yep, I’ve been there before as well and I’m here to tell ya there are plenty of ways out there to jump start your inspiration and I’m here to share a few that have helped me find my mojo.

“connected” in the world of social media we sometimes feel a certain addiction and consumption as our devices take over our daily lives


If you’ve been around me long enough then you have most likely have heard me mention the photography scavenger hunt. What is the photography scavenger hunt you might ask? it is an online event that started by my friend Chrysta Rae way back in the infant days of Google+ (R.I.P.) and grew to become somewhat of an anomaly as far as internet photography communities go as it is entirely inclusive for all that participate and the people involved truly care about each other and their growth both personally and artistically.

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Photo by Robby Klein

Hi Everyone! My name is Joseph Ross and I’m a portrait photographer currently residing in Nashville, TN. Huge thank you to the blog for reaching out and giving me the opportunity to guest write. Admittedly I was a bit nervous at first, knowing that my post would follow the words and ideas of so many other awesome photographers but i’m so happy to be here nevertheless. Though my career is young, I hope that my words will encourage emerging photographers to consider the tools I feel best put me in the position I’m in today.


My journey as a photographer started three years ago when I was a senior in college, studying for a degree which would lead to a career that I realized I would never be passionate about. Long story short, I received my degrees, framed them, and gave them the respect they deserved because I was grateful to have received any sort of college education. I had to convince myself (and my parents) that though I worked hard for them, a lifetime of regret wouldn’t be worth it.

So, after graduation I packed up all of my things along with my “new to me” Canon 5D classic (manufactured in 2006), and moved to Nashville where I was convinced that I would become the next big thing…. man was I in over my head.

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