Posts By Brad Moore


Advanced Color Grading to Create Mood & Drama with Unmesh Dinda

Master the art of color grading your photos with Unmesh Dinda! In this class you’ll learn practical steps you can apply to your photographs in a variety of ways and to achieve dramatic and moody results. You’ll learn how to color grade using gradient maps, curves, selective color adjustments, look up tables, and more. Unmesh even teaches you techniques for incorporating film-like grain, overlays, light flares, and spot light effects to take your creativity and color grading to new heights.



In Case You Missed It: Jaw-Dropping, Heart-Stopping, Eye-Popping Photoshop Effects

Join Unmesh Dinda and take your Photoshop skills to the next level! This class is jam-packed with tricks and techniques that will make your jaw drop. You’ll learn how to retouch any surface without damaging texture, how to selectively apply blur for dramatic effect, how to scale a photo without damaging the main subject, how to automate actions to work faster, how to gain unlimited filters through the Gradient Map, and so much more. Unmesh has a great knack for making complicated techniques simple and approachable, and he even provides files for you to download and practice with as you learn. By this end of the class these lessons will serve as a go-to reference to come back to anytime you need a refresher.

Roberto Valenzuela will be teaching at Photoshop World Las Vegas, taking place August 21-23, so register now to come see him in person!

Behind The Shot: A Look Into My Process

Today I wanted to share some of my favorite photos from international workshops, along with the stories and techniques behind them. I’m also including the EXIF data of each photo so you can see my settings. Enjoy!

Behind the Shot: Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam: Roberto Valenzuela

Female model, Yen, posing in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Photo by Roberto Valenzuela.
Camera: Canon EOS R | Lens: RF 28-70mm F2 L USM |
Focal Length: 50 mm | Exposure: 1/100; f/3.5; ISO 400 | Flash: 2 Profoto B10 flashes used

During the shoot with model Yen, it began to rain. We were stuck in a little neighborhood in the middle of Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam. While we waited for the rain to recede, I was inspired by the old world look of the neighborhood in front of me. To add to the nostalgia of the scene, I used a technique I created called “Flash Flare,” where a flash is inches from the lens pointed right at the lens to hit the sensor.

BTS Video by: Tyler Austin

Because I wanted to add to the old world feel of this place, I added a ½ CTO filter to the light to give it an “In Camera” vintage look. I posed the model as if she was taking a stroll around her neighborhood. Another flash was used to illuminate the model.  The officer on the motorcycle to the right, contributes beautifully to the cinematic old world feel of the scene.

Behind the Shot: Hanoi Vietnam

Camera: Canon EOS R | Lens: RF 24-105mm F4 L USM |
Focal Length: 24 mm | Exposure: 1/50; f/3.5; ISO 800 | Flash: 1 Profoto B10 flash used

This photograph was created with quite a bit of luck. The model Thuy was actually the MC for the Canon EOS R event in Vietnam. I asked her if I could take some quick photos of her in the old district. With her beautiful red dress, I thought it would go nicely with the old vintage feel of the old district in Hanoi.

Behind the scenes shot of the setting.

Once there, to my surprise, we ran into these two soldiers dressed in uniform on the street playing a game. I politely asked, with the help of my translator, if we could include them in the photograph. Not only did they say yes, but they were excited about it. To bring visual attention to our model Thuy, I used a Profoto B10 with a beauty dish to illuminate her.

Behind the Shot: Hong Kong

Camera: Canon EOS R | Lens: RF 28-70mm F2 L USM |
Focal Length: 28 mm | Exposure: 1/400; f/6.3; ISO 1600 | Flash: 1 Profoto B10 flash used

This photo was taken in a very odd place. As we explored our surroundings in Hong Kong, I noticed a tiny little island on the Google Maps app on my phone. This island is called Magazine Island. Even though it was a long shot, I asked our boat driver if it was possible for us to go to that island. She laughed, but she did it.

Once we got there, we hiked to the top to take advantage of the interesting rock formations. So I asked the model Fanny to lay on the floor and frame her face with her arms. We used a Profoto B10 very close to her face to create this flattering illumination on Fanny’s face.

Behind the Shot: Singapore

Camera: Canon EOS R | Lens: RF 28-70mm F2 L USM |
Focal Length: 28 mm | Exposure: 1/800; f/3.5; ISO 100 | Flash: 1 Profoto B10 flash used
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Speed Up Your Portrait Retouching Workflow Using The Perfectly Clear Plug-In with Kristina Sherk

Learn how to perform amazing portrait retouching with Perfectly Clear Complete with Kristina Sherk! Perfectly Clear Complete is a plug-in for Photoshop and Lightroom Classic that was developed from the ground up exclusively for retouching digital photographs. In this class you’ll get oriented to the interface and learn how to make the most of its face selection capabilities to apply intelligent edits to faces, eyes, teeth, and skin. Best of all you can leverage the built-in presets to create your own that you can batch apply right out of Lightroom ClassicClick here for a FREE TRIAL of Perfectly Clear and to get 20% off the purchase price.



In Case You Missed It… Master Post-Processing: 10 Mistakes Every New Photographer Makes and How to Fix Them

Become a more well rounded photographer! We all make mistakes, so be prepared by learning how to avoid them and how to fix them. Join Kristina Sherk, retoucher extraordinaire, as she teaches you how to deal with the 10 most common mistakes all photographers make. From correcting uneven exposures to dealing with the results of a mixed-lighting environment to correcting blur caused by camera shake, and more, Kristina discusses how to avoid problems in-camera and then shows you how to fix them in Photoshop. You’ll even learn how to be a power user of tools you probably already use. By the end of the class you’ll be ready to take your photography and Photoshop skills to the next level.

Canon Explorer of Light David Bergman
Canon Explorer of Light David Bergman

Remote Cameras for Concert Photography2

As someone who has photographed over 1,000 concerts and teaches a series of live concert photography workshops, I’m often asked, “How do you keep it fresh?”

Bon Jovi in concert at the Phillips Arena in Atlanta, GA on April 15, 2010.
Bon Jovi in concert at the Phillips Arena in Atlanta, GA on April 15, 2010.

I toured with Bon Jovi for nearly a decade and just started traveling with country superstar Luke Combs earlier this year. On tour, it’s easy to make the same pictures over and over, so I need to challenge myself to make unique images every night. Something I do to help keep things fresh is use remote cameras.

I spent many years covering sporting events around the world – first for the Miami Herald and then for Sports Illustrated – and we would often set up remotes. Making this extra effort gives me two huge advantages over everyone else.

First, I can make images from places where it’s not physically possible to go, like behind the backboard at a basketball game or in the net during a hockey match. Capturing the action from those angles is pretty awesome, and it’s now commonplace to see television shots from those exact locations.

Second, by using multiple remotes, I can make pictures from many different angles at once. When I covered the NFL Draft, I had remotes all around Radio City Music Hall so I could get multiple shots of the first draft pic meeting up with the commissioner.

Matt Stafford, the first pick of the 2009 NFL Draft, is photographed with commissioner Roger Goodell from four different angles at the exact same time using multiple remote cameras.
Matt Stafford, the first pick of the 2009 NFL Draft, is photographed with commissioner Roger Goodell from four different angles at the exact same time using multiple remote cameras.

Many years ago, I started using remote cameras at concerts. Since I work for the bands, I’m allowed to go on stage to shoot. But I’m very respectful with that access and I pick my moments to go up there. I get the shot and get out. By putting a remote camera on stage, I can make those unique images from the band’s point of view all night long.

My favorite spot is on the drum kit, since it’s usually centered behind the singer. No matter where I am in the venue, I can trigger that camera and make pictures when they turn around and you can see the crowd behind them.

David Bergman's remote Canon 1Dx Mark II camera mounted in Bon Jovi drummer Tico Torres' drum kit during a show in Columbus, OH on March 18, 2017.
David Bergman’s remote Canon 1Dx Mark II camera mounted in Bon Jovi drummer Tico Torres’ drum kit during a show in Columbus, OH on March 18, 2017.

I will sometimes put a secondary remote in the lighting trusses above the stage. I have to set it up early in the morning when our crew is loading in, and I won’t have access to it until after the show. Luckily the battery on the Canon 1Dx Mark II camera easily lasts all day so I don’t have to worry about it dying before the show starts.

Luke Combs and fans are photographed using an overhead remote mounted in the lighting truss during a show in Evansville, IN on February 16, 2019.
Luke Combs and fans are photographed using an overhead remote mounted in the lighting truss during a show in Evansville, IN on February 16, 2019.

To attach the overhead remote, I use a Manfrotto Super Clamp and Magic Arm to attach to our trusses (with a safety cable of course!). For Bon Jovi, I used another Magic Arm to attach the camera onto one of the drummer’s mic stands. Luke’s dummer doesn’t have stands as his mics are clipped directly onto his kit, so I use a Platypod Max floor plate and Syrp ball head to position the camera on the riser. I taped some non-slip rubber material to the bottom of the plate to absorb some of the vibration and keep it from sliding around.

I fire my remotes using Pocket Wizard transceivers. I use the Pocket Wizard Plus IV on the bodies since it’s low profile, and I manually trigger it with a Pocket Wizard Plus III that hangs on the pass around my neck. Using the “long range” mode, I’ve triggered my cameras from the other end of a football stadium without any problems.

If I’m shooting on stage and want to trigger all cameras at the same time, I move the Wizard to the hot shoe on one of my handheld 1Dx2 bodies, and all the cameras will fire at the same time.

Luke Combs photographed from a remote camera on the drum kit during a show in Baton Rouge, LA on February 9, 2019.
Luke Combs photographed from a remote camera on the drum kit during a show in Baton Rouge, LA on February 9, 2019.

My remotes are all manual exposure because the spotlights often hit directly into the lens and that would throw off any automatic setting. With experience, I can usually guess the exposure and, shooting RAW, I have some latitude if I’m a bit under or over. I usually use autofocus since the subject moves around too much. Depending on how much I’m zoomed in, I’ll keep it on zone autofocus, which picks up my subject almost every time.

In general, shooting a concert with remotes is a numbers game. If I snap 1000 frames and get one or two awesome images, then I’m happy. Those are the only photos anyone will ever see.

By going above and beyond to make unique images, it’s more fun for me and keeps my clients (and the fans!) wanting more.

——

Canon Explorer of Light David Bergman is a New York based commercial photographer and photo educator who specializes in portraiture, music, and action. As the official tour photographer for Bon Jovi and Luke Combs, he has documented bands on stage and on the road in more than 30 countries, and shares his experience with photographers of all skill levels at his “Shoot From The Pit” live concert photography workshops. In addition to his other celebrity clients, Bergman has 13 Sports Illustrated covers to his credit and has photographed numerous Olympics, World Series’, Super Bowls, NBA, and NCAA Championships. His high-resolution GigaPan of President Obama’s first inaugural speech was viewed by over 30 million people, and he produced a 20,000 megapixel image at Yankee Stadium that was printed and displayed 130 feet wide. Bergman is an engaging and passionate public speaker and hosts the weekly web series, “Ask David Bergman” on the Adorama Instagram TV channel. He was a charter member of Apple’s prestigious Aperture Advisory Board, is on the design board for Think Tank Photo, and is an AdoramaPix Ambassador and Red River Pro. 

You can see more of David’s work at DavidBergman.net, and keep up with him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Client Proofing Like A Pro Using Lightroom Classic with Terry White

Learn the latest workflow for client proofing using either version of Lightroom! Join Terry White as he breaks down the process for selecting the best photos from a shoot, syncing them to the cloud, sharing them with your client, and viewing their interactions back in Lightroom. Through each step in the process Terry shares the ins and outs of what’s required and shows you the results that a client would see. Terry wraps up the class with an alternative workflow to include watermarks if that’s what your needs require. The collaborative proofing workflow in Lightroom is brand new and still evolving, so learn how to get started with it today!



In Case You Missed It: The Personal Side of Terry White

Come sit down with one of our favorite tech gurus and portrait photographers, Terry White! In this Personal Side Interview, Kalebra and Terry talk about the evolution of technology, where it’s been as well as where it’s going. You all know how much Terry loves his gadgets but did you know it dates back even to when he was a child? You’ll love hearing about his favorite toy he ever got for Christmas. Terry also chats about how technology has affected his career and offers encouraging advice for embracing tech in your own life.

Peter Hurley will be teaching at Photoshop World Las Vegas, taking place August 21-23, so register now to come see him in person!

Are You Ambifacial?

As humans, we all know that we are quite unique with each of us having traits like no other. As portrait photographers, it’s our duty to bring the best out of whomever steps foot in front of our lens.

Our brains should be assessing their features while actively directing them toward what we deem as the most photogenic angle of their face. Each and every one one of us has a sweet spot, and it’s your job to find it for your subject’s.

Although a rare few may be ambifacial, most are not, and being able to figure this out correctly is imperative to make the most out of any portrait session. Here are some of my favorite tips to help you implement that process not only in your own work, but to figure out your own best side as well.

You can see more of Peter’s work at PeterHurley.com, and keep up with him on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. You can also join the Headshot Crew and learn from him and his ever growing group of associates!

Peter will be teaching at Photoshop World Las Vegas, taking place August 21-23, so register now to see him in person!

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