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  • Category Archives Guest Blogger

    Photo courtesy of RC Concepcion Don’t Get Social, Be Social A question that I frequently hear of photographers and creatives, which always makes my skin crawl, is, "What's your approach to social?" Of course, the person asking wants an answer related to how to gain followers or boost their engagement metrics to drive revenue. Those are the questions we've been trained to ask as artists scrambling to find a consumer for our wares. While having a sound social media strategy is only a good thing, my challenge to you as an artist is to do something much more rewarding: don't get social—be social. If you're looking to gain marketing insight from the rest of this post, read no farther, as that nugget won't follow. I'm going to talk more about that oh-so-rare interaction that won't help pay the mortgage, but is what I feed…

    Hi! My name is Regina Pagles and I am a portrait photographer residing in the rural community of Springdale, Utah (Pop. 450), just outside of Zion National Park. I have a small studio where I have been taking portraits of friends and family since I discovered studio lighting in 2010. I have combined the techniques learned from my biggest inspirations, Peter Hurley (expression), Sue Bryce (posing), Don Giannatti (lighting) and Scott Kelby (post processing) to develop and hone my own style. In the spirit of ‘paying it forward,’ I would like to share with you what I have learned and the techniques I use, in honor of those that have inspired me and who have offered their knowledge so graciously. I will take you through my post processing workflow, using a recent image of one of my favorite subjects, model Yolanda Damon Harris. Straight…

    NEW FRONTIERS All photographers have familiar subject matter. Maybe you are wedding photographer, a sports shooter or a headshot specialist. You cover similar events and subjects year after year. The natural progression is you start asking yourself, ‘is there a different way to photograph this familiar subject?’ Sometimes unique perspectives or new locations prompt spikes in creativity and original ideas. Sometimes new lighting or post processing creates fresh looks. And other times new gear comes along that lets you realize new possibilities. I’ve been photographing adventure sports for almost 30 years, and I have watched how trends, techniques and styles have all evolved over time. Just when you think you have seen it all, photographers figure out new techniques and perspectives and things become fresh again. Right now the adventure sports genre is experiencing the ‘drone revolution.’ Video and still photographers have a new…

    First off, I want to thank my friends Brad and Scott for inviting me back as guest blogger. I love these dudes – because they love photography and because they love helping photographers, around the planet, make better photographs. They are also really good people. This post is about Creative Visualization, which is the title of my latest book, Creative Visualization for Photographers. In this post I will share some highlights from the book. What is creative visualization? Basically, Creative Visualization is envisioning the end result – and doing this is often the key to making a good photograph. It’s kind of like going on a road trip: If you know where you are going, you’ll know how to get there, making the right travel decisions along the way. When it comes to making a photograph, if you envision the end result, you will…

    Hey Gang! Holy cow am I seriously writing as a guest blogger for Scott Kelby?! I am honestly a little freaked out right now. When I started working for Scott and Kelby Media Group almost 5 years ago, I never would have imagined I would be asked to speak to such an amazing group of readers. Some of the brightest and most talented photographers on the planet have graced these pages and I am truly honored to share my time with you. Some of you may know that I direct our on-location KelbyOne classes with our amazing line up of instructors. But I also teach classes on KelbyOne showing you how to edit video in Adobe Premiere Pro. As I sit here trying to figure what exactly a videographer can talk about with photographers, one big topic comes to mind; how can you, as…

    Firstly I want to thank Scott and Brad for allowing me a space here. I wondered what to write about, but I suppose, in the end, I thought it just made sense to tell the story of why I shoot and how I shoot. <<<< REWIND >>>> It’s a Monday in June 2009. My wife has just given birth to our first daughter. I get up at 5am. I get on the train at 5:20am. I sit on the train for two hours (same seat, every day. Same newspaper, every day, same people around me, every day). I get to my desk in central London at 8:30am. Tip, tap, tip, tap….. I tinker away at the computer keyboard writing code. I have lunch at 1pm, with the same people. Every day (cool people btw). At 5:30pm I leave my desk. At 6pm I get…

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